Unusual produce....

ldstarr

DH and I have subscribed to a service that ships Organic, non-GMO produce to us bi-weekly. So far, we really like it. It has caused us to try things we either wouldn't find locally or wouldn't purchase. For instance, last week's box had a jicama in it. I found out I love it when I eat it like a carrot stick! We've also received black radishes. They are delicious roasted and not at all radishy. Of course, other items received are more main stream, but it helps us vary our produce.

SaveComment12Like1
Comments (12)
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
blfenton

What a cool idea. Glad you're enjoying the experience.

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
DawnInCal

I love jicama, but always forget about it when out shopping. Thanks for the reminder; I think I'll pick some up when I go shopping today. It's a nice crunchy addition to salads. Another that I enjoy is daikon radish. It also has a nice crunch, but not a strong radish flavor.

I make an Asian influenced salad that I first had at an airport in Japan. Carrots, seeded cucumber and daikon are cut into long thin strips and seasoned with a dressing of rice vinegar, sesame oil, salt, a tiny bit of sugar, red pepper flakes and toasted sesame seeds. Now I've reminded myself that it's been a while since I've made this refreshing summer treat!

Another favorite from Asia is dragon fruit. They are bright pink on the outside with white flesh and small black seeds. To me they have the taste and texture of a combination of watermelon and pear.



In the past couple of years, I've started seeing them in grocery stores here. They are expensive, but I buy one now and then because I enjoy them so.

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Jasdip

We've bought jicama in the past and really enjoyed it. A nice mellow flavour. I've made it in a salad julienned, with carrot and fresh pineapple.

Dawn, thanks for the explanation of dragon fruit. I've always wondered what it tasted like.

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
glenda_al

Was in a family owned Chinese restaurant, recently, and they were eating the dragon fruit. Wondered what it was.

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Ava

Love Dragon fruit which tastes similar to kiwi to me.

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
marilyn_c

I have grown a lot of epiphyllums, and I bought this Dragon Fruit named Connie Mayer in late summer and 9 months later it bloomed and looked like this.

It was growing a foot a week. Unfortunately, a windstorm blew it off my porch and the feral hogs ate it.

I bought a dragon fruit at the supermarket and collected the seeds. They were fun and interesting to grow, but they washed away in the flood. Once I move, I intend to do a do-over and grow another Connie Mayer and more from seeds. I am less interested in them as a food source, but more interested in growing them just for the sake of doing it.

3 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
anniesjacuzzi

Marilyn.... that is stunning....although I love dragon fruit to eat...you’ve given me another reason to love it! Can you give me any hints how to grow it from the seeds? Robin

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
marilyn_c

It has been quite awhile ago, but I cut it open and either picked out the seeds, or picked out the surrounding pulp. I believe I started them in Miracle Grow potting mix. They germinated quickly, I do remember that, and they looked very unlike what you might think. Just two tiny leaves and a stem. The more typical looking plant part...like a little stem, for want of a better word, then grew out of the center.

I just sort of pressed them into the planting medium and watered them. They look like a typical epiphyllum, orchid cactus, but instead of having flat segments, they are more angular.

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Lars

I grow dragon fruit, and for me, they bloom late September and ripen in October. Here is one cut open

The flowers


have to be hand-pollinated between 9 and 10 PM, when they first open, and so I have to watch for the buds when they appear.
We got a lot of pitaya juice in Brazil, and I loved it, but I don't get enough fruit to make juice and just eat them when they ripen.

I also grow cherimoya, and it also has to be hand pollinated, but I get more fruit from it. Right now I have white sapote fruit ripening, for the first time from a tree that I've had for eight years! Fortunately, I do not have to do any pollinating for this, but the fruit is good for only a couple of days. I might freeze some of them, as I expect to get quite a few this year.

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
DawnInCal

Wow, Marilyn and Lars - your results from planting and growing the dragon fruit seeds are really impressive. I'm not much of a gardener (have a black thumb no matter how hard I try), but I might have to give this a go!


Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
anniesjacuzzi

Marilyn..thank you. I have had luck with growing orchid cactus ... just not from seed. I can’t wait to try this. I have a night blooming cereus that my grandmother never got to bloom...I took it and reported it and it bloomed beautifully.. although that might have been the negative energy at my grandmother’s house! I’m out to buy a dragon fruit today!

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
maifleur01

Be aware that what is sold as dragon fruit can be from several different plants from the same family which explains why you see several different sizes. The plants of big one that is sold in stores can become really big. Using the seeds should give you a plant that will have the similar size fruit. You can also find plants on line or at nurseries but do some search on how to tell the segments apart as there are lots of plants that look similar but are not in the same family.

Save    
Browse Gardening and Landscaping Stories on Houzz See all Stories
Decorating Guides 10 Unusual Interior Materials for High-End, Custom Appeal
Express your personality more easily than ever with laminates, wovens and even bone all around the home
Full Story
Houzz Tours Houzz Tour: 12 Years of Tinkering Produce an Amazingly Artful Loft
Major DIY efforts turn 3 units in a former Portland factory into a single home brimming with personality
Full Story
Homes Around the World Houzz Tour: Traditional Chicory Kiln Becomes a Retreat for Two
A couple converts the Philip Island, Australia, structure into a vacation home with an unusual open-plan design
Full Story