Should I plant Amorpha fruticosa (indigo bush)? xpost

canishel(z7 TN)

I received two seedlings of indigo bush. The plan was to plant them in a sunny/part sunny clearing in the woods. The soil is clay, but I amend plantings with compost and soil conditioner.

Indigo bush is apparently tolerant of drought, which is important for me because I won't be able to water it frequently. The objective is to provide habitat and foodstuffs for wildlife. So far in that area I've planted yaupon holly, Arizona cypress, common milkweed, and butterfly milkweed, none of which have died yet.

Indigo bush is considered a noxious weed in two states. I am in East Tennessee.

Does anyone have any experience with invasiveness of indigo bush?

Thanks for any advice.

SaveComment6Like
Comments (6)
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
WoodsTea 6a MO(6a)

The problem in WA at least is that it's considered non-native there, which isn't the case in TN.

The only thing I can say about it from experience is that these things get pretty big in the right conditions. There is some near the creek that our part of the city drains into that's 10+ feet tall. It's really something -- I wish I could plant some in my yard, but the lower ground where it would be moist enough has more than enough shrubs already.


Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
canishel(z7 TN)

Thanks.

I don't care how big it gets; there's enough clearing to handle it. If it dies from drought, at least I've learned something. My concern is will it take over the other plants.

I cross-posted in Tennessee gardening, so we'll see if anyone responds.

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
WoodsTea 6a MO(6a)

I guess my point is that it's only considered noxious/invasive in two states where it's not native, so I wouldn't make any conclusion about its aggressiveness in TN based just on that. It competes well along streams, but it's not like a bush honeysuckle type plant that will spread everywhere, and if your site is reasonably dry you shouldn't have to worry about it taking over. The yaupon holly should easily hold its own against it.

As a tall shrub it could certainly shade out something like the milkweeds, but then they can spread easily via seed -- especially the common milkweed -- if there's enough sun in the areas around them.


Save     Thanked by canishel
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

There's some of it on the roadside here. One patch is up on a mound between the road and a field in sort of hedge, the other is at the edge of a ditch. They are bunched in groups so it looks like it does like to spread, and doesn't look too sensitive to moisture.

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
canishel(z7 TN)

Thanks for all the info.

They now have a home. We'll see how they do.

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
barbarag_happy(8A)

Very drought tolerant but was way too happy for me here in SE Virginia. It suckers like mad. Pretty in bloom tho!

Save     Thanked by canishel
Browse Gardening and Landscaping Stories on Houzz See all Stories
Product Picks Guest Picks: 20 Gorgeous Perennials to Plant Now
Take advantage of warm spring weather to create a colorful garden with blooming plants, succulents and ornamental grasses
Full Story
California Native Plants 9 Flowers That Draw Butterflies
Charm winged beauties and human visitors alike with these enticing, fragrant and colorful blooms for the garden
Full Story
Landscape Design 4 Tips for Creating a Small Garden That Welcomes Wildlife
Win over birds, bees, butterflies and neighbors with these design strategies
Full Story
Inspiration for some backyard chats
Inspiration for a warm welcome
Inspiration for dinner time under the stars
Inspiration for a little quality time
Inspiration for making that best pizza ever
Step into a Ferguson Showroom and you'll be surrounded by the latest styles in kitchen, bath and lighting design... Read More