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mtnrdredux

Disposable decor? Yay or nay?

MtnRdRedux
5 years ago

5 years ago I bought a rug as a quasi placeholder in our entry hall. It was about 1500 at ABC Carpet and it was very casual. It reminds me of a burlap teepee with sort of random embroidery on it. Odd, yes. We have a country home this time so I really didn't want formal unless it was clearly vintage. I like the over dyed look but so many looked junky.

I kept my eye out but the only things I really liked a lot were antique Persians that were 20k and up. I have two rugs I've spent that much on...one got coffee spilled on it and the other just does not go anywhere in our current home. Both are rolled up.

I tried to find something on our travels in India, but I felt rushed and they were both mistakes, albeit pretty cheap mistakes.

I'm just awful at rug selection. and in the back of my mind too is that you never know if/when you might decide to move and it can be so hard to repurpose things.

Today I happened to be at HomeGoods. I came across an 8x10 for ... $116. Wool. From India ironically. I just laid it out and I really like it! For about the cost of valet parking my car at ABC carpet, lol.

This got me thinking about the Goodwill thread on the conversation side… And the problem that cheap clothing has created, whereby we all buy a lot more of it and then it needs to be disposed of. It occurred to me when I got home that I just did the same thing with a rug...

here it is in my entry hall

Comments (71)

  • Laurie Gordon
    5 years ago

    I like it. Even if you keep it for a short time, you've enjoyed the look and not spent a fortune.

  • winker58
    5 years ago

    I have purchased both inexpensive and less expensive what I would call more disposable furniture (I say disposable because it was not made so well and would not last) and at times have wished I would have gone with all disposable type furniture because when you you have children and they have friends over things do get damaged no matter what and it is disheartening to take time to decide on items and put forth the money and then do have items ruined. I should have bought all disposable stuff and not been so uptight about it and then I would have saved myself a lot of grief. Not that my kids weren't respectful of our home or anything. Things just happen. It seems like a lot of people buy inexpensive furniture items sight unseen now as well. I have read so many reviews on various sites that complain about scratches and broken parts that I have shied away from it myself. I'm still looking for an online site that is reliable. I think too with all of the catalogues that come out with furniture, decor, bedding and paint colors that change with the season, a lot of people feel more inclined to change often. I love to look at them, but cannot change out my decorating from warm colors to cool colors depending on seasons.

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  • roarah
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Price is irrelevant, for something is only disposable when you actually dispose of it. I got rid of my mitchelland Gold sofas far sooner than I will my much less expensive new living room furniture. If you like it, use it and it lasts no matter the cost it is valuable to you at that time.

    lovely space!

  • Bumblebeez SC Zone 7
    5 years ago

    One of my dogs, who passed away in May 2014, made all my rugs in those last years, disposable.

  • nosoccermom
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Haven't read the whole thread, but the very notion of "dated" (meaning that it needs to be replaced) already points us towards disposable decor, regardless of price point.

    Some people can't afford spending 5K to replace a dated but fine kitchen while others don't bat an eye to rip out and replace a 100K kitchen. So, you may hesitate at disposing of something that cost, say 5K, while others won't toss a perfectly rug that cost 116.00 (Witness the recent thread on putting a clock table that was 540.00 to the curb.)

  • Annette Holbrook(z7a)
    5 years ago

    It's only disposable if you get rid of it. I have a few mass marketed things in my house that I bought as place fillers. Some were just that and others ended up getting the job so to speak. Now that my kids are growing up and moving out some of those things are moving on with them and are just what they need.

    Having said that, I'm not a fan of that rug. I love your house, it is very warm and welcoming to me and that rug is just too glaring in that space. Especially in view of the beautiful rug in the neighboring space.

  • Allison0704
    5 years ago

    I'm voting to return it, as it doesn't do anything for me or the room. I'd go vintage, or at least vintage looking.

  • graywings123
    5 years ago

    I've seen those low cost wool rugs at Home Goods and wondered how they would wear. Let us know.

  • tinam61
    5 years ago

    I have to agree - I don't think the rug does your room justice. You can do better.

  • mitchdesj
    5 years ago

    I have to agree about finding a more interesting rug anchor that entrance.

  • 1929Spanish-GW
    5 years ago

    I have never bought a placeholder anything. It's a waste of money and time. Many pieces of my furniture are funky antiques I've had for many years. We have two dressers from ikea in the master bedroom. We've had them for more than five years. They were cheap and fit the space (literally because the room is small). I like the look, and since they are in a private space we just needed something functional.

    That being said pricing is relative to one's financial situation. What is a value to one may not be to someone else.

    Style and quality are also relative to the environment they are in. This is where I think that rug fails. It's bright with a specific pattern and stands out in the room, but the style is not appropriate for the surrounding space.

  • IdaClaire
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Nope - that rug just doesn't do your gorgeous space justice. Not at all. I think the brightness of it is jarring and would love to see even a coffee-stained Persian there instead. This one looks like a placeholder - like something put down just to check for size, but not something that's going to be staying for any length of time. Bring out one of the rolled rugs and let us see! ;-)

  • sas95
    5 years ago

    I used to buy placeholder items, but don't anymore. I really try to buy only things I like, though I have tossed or donated enough stuff due to buying mistakes on my part.

    I do not like that rug for your space. It looks out of place.

  • RoseAbbey
    5 years ago

    Definitely not even as a place holder. Looks like the two rugs showing go into two absolutely different homes.

    On a side note, do I see a hint of orange red in your other rug? I thought you hated red!

  • dedtired
    5 years ago

    I wasn't going to comment on the rug but since others have already said it, I agree that the rug does not work. It is too bright and jarring for the space. Something more muted would work better. It does not have a quality look for that beautiful space.


    My problem with disposable furniture is that it is often bought with the idea that it will be used until you find the "right thing". But then you stop looking and the compromise furniture stays. Ask me how I know!

  • malabacat
    5 years ago

    We've also tried to stop buying placeholder items. That said, I don't think you need a rug in that room at all. You already have a beautiful space, gorgeous wood floors and a lovely table.

  • MtnRdRedux
    Original Author
    5 years ago

    LOL, Rose, I do. I hate red, and orange too. Much happier with ivory and taupe and white non-colors. The other rug you see is a runner I bought in New Orleans for the Maine house and decided not to use there. When i bought it was on top of a pile of other rugs and it was not until it arrived home I saw how out of square it was. A $1200 mistake that also has to go. I know vintage can be out of square but this is not vintage I think it is just poorly made, alas.


    IDA, The rolled up rugs are far too big for this space. One is a Basarabian floral and the other is a silk. The two 8x10ss I got in India (specifically for the entry hall)) are similarly geometric. One looks a lot like the Home Goods one except it is sort of olive and brown. The other is so awful, at least for my space. What can I say I picked it out in this ill-lit hole in the wall in the middle of a bustling market. It is ... wait for it ... kind of Southwestern looking and I would say almost peachy and plum. Yup, that is what I said. You can see, I am rug challenged.

  • RoseAbbey
    5 years ago

    I think all hand knotted rugs are out of square, at least all of mine are! That runner is beautiful though, looks great in your hallway.

  • joaniepoanie
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    "Cycle of cheap, disposable decor".......I'm already there.

    Several years ago we redid our main floor which hadn't been touched for a long time while putting three kids through college. It was shabby looking and when DS got engaged, knowing we'd have a lot of out of town company for the wedding, I got going.

    I did not want to spend a lot since we plan to relocate in the next few years and don't plan to take much with us....too expensive to move household goods, especially when they may not work/fit at the new place.

    The kitchen remodel was already under way so when that was done, we had the rest painted. I only kept my DR furniture and one sofa, still in ok shape, for the FR, which is DH's tv room/office. To that we added pieces from Ikea....a secretary, tv console, and a chest of drawers to hold the printer and charging station. Also a very inexpensive coffee table bought online.

    We needed all new furniture for the LR...my tv room (DH and I rarely like the same types of shows). I bought a decent sofa and chair....Smith Brothers on sale. The tv console, coffee table and end table all purchased off the internet. The tv console was around $600 and the other tables around $300. I have to say I was surprised at the quality for such inexpensive pieces. No problems with scratches, falling apart. Same with the IKEA stuff. I purchased inexpensive artwork and accessories as well.

    When we move, the kids will will get first dibs on anything we're not taking. The rest will be donated to a local charity which furnishes homes and apartments for people getting back on their feet. While I'm not thrilled that the case goods are probably from China (gosh, what isn't these days?) we saved $ in the short term and all these items will get a second home somewhere when we relocate.....win/win.

    Mtn.......I like the rug but I think what's throwing me off is the stark contrast in style and color between it and your other entry rug/runner. Such a pretty space!

  • blfenton
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Some questions for you regarding your front entrance - What do you want it to say or portray about your home, your family and the way you live.

    Who uses it - just guests, does your family use it on a regular basis or never except as a thorough fare to upstairs/downstairs.

    I don't need/want answers, just something for you to ponder.

    I still like the rug - If you are having guests I could see a big colourful bouquet of flowers on the table and really having it work with the rug and table. The only time I can see it perhaps not working is during Christmas season but that's an easy fix - use another rug. Maybe one of the rugs from India would work for that time of the year.

  • IdaClaire
    5 years ago

    How's the rug selection on your local CL? (Or has that been covered above and I missed it?)

  • MtnRdRedux
    Original Author
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    On CL and or ebay, local or not, I see a lot of very ordinary looking rugs with red in them. I like faded Oushaks, the ones that always say "call for price".

  • MtnRdRedux
    Original Author
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    BLFenton,

    The large urn in the center gets decorated seasonally and or for parties. It still has green pears in it now but soon will have pine cones and gourds, etc. I do not do a red and green Christmas. I do pink and olive. The large white urn is filled with vintage mercury balls in shades of pink, silver and gold, and beribboned. For parties in the spring I fill it with blue hydrangea plants.

    The entry hall is used as an entry by guests; we go into doors nearer one of the garages (the house sprawls horizontally and we have two driveway entrances and two garages). But the entry also separates the rest of the house from our "wing", which has our MBR, our bathrooms, office and the pool. So I personally walk through it a lot.

    I'd like it to say "interesting, casual, vintage-y".

    I keep looking at the rug this morning and I am afraid to admit I like it. I like the way the table looks against it, and that it is the same color as the walls. Since the old one is ripped, this is def not going back. I did see a local vendor who will brings rugs to our house to try, maybe I will do that.

    Urn decor, three ways (and a shot where you can see the rug that tore down the middle that I had to get rid of).

  • dedtired
    5 years ago

    I love the runner! The wonky shape adds to the charm. The urn decor is lovely. Do you change it up each season or reuse what you have?

  • ingrid_vc so. CA zone 9
    5 years ago

    The longer I live the more I dislike the casual attitude in this country of discarding anything and everything that is out of date or not quite perfect. Literally millions of people would kill to have even one of the worst "before" kitchens that are shown here before the $100,000 remodel. I've gotten a lot more humble about what I need or should have. My tastes don't change when I move to a different locale because it's "me" no matter where I am, other than some concessions to the local climate. Some of the rugs are fraying at the binding around the edges but they'll stay until they're past the point where I can stand it. One of my coffee tables was used by my parents for 30 years, ditto the vintage claw-footed oak dining table. Both pieces fit our needs perfectly. I was tired of the Oriental rug in the dining room and now it looks wonderful in the entry room. The rug in the entry room now looks wonderful in the kitchen, and the kitchen rug, a tribal Gabbeh reproduction gives color to the conversation area in the living room. The house looks refreshed without spending a penny. The money I could have spent by throwing out and buying something new is donated to favorite animal and environmental charities, which desperately need every penny they can get. I don't mean for this to sound preachy, because what works for me for many reasons may not work for someone else. The idea of buying a "filler piece" is a new concept for me. I'll do without until I find the right piece, and nowadays there are so many places to look that it shouldn't be that difficult to find something suitable. The "perfect" piece may not even exist, but what does perfect mean anyway? If it makes me happy it's perfect enough for me.

  • IdaClaire
    5 years ago

    We wouldn't actually "discard" things like this though, would we? Once replaced, nothing newish and useable is going to end up at the curb waiting for the trash truck to haul it to the landfill, right? I've replaced a number of things since we moved, but have sold them - giving someone else something still nice at a good price and benefiting me by having a little cash to offset the cost of my new item - or given things away to others who wanted something different for their own home. I donated quite a bit of my cottage décor to last year's "garage sale" at our church, raising proceeds for missions. Win-win!

    To me, "disposal" décor is sort of a misnomer. Whether sold or given away (to family, friend, or charity), the item still has a life. It hasn't really been disposed of.

  • 1929Spanish-GW
    5 years ago

    My point about "disposable" isn't as much as where it goes, but the attitude that something is better than nothing plus the need for immediate gratification. These two things cost time (wasted because you have to look twice) and money buying two things instead of the one thing you really want (the impact depends on one's financial situation).

    Case in point. I bought a dining room table on CL that I thought would serve my increased seating needs when I got married. I liked the table a lot, but it ended up looking awful with my chairs. It was a bad purchase. I sold it for the same price, but the cost of transporting it came out of my pocket.


  • Gooster
    5 years ago

    Accessories aside (do people actually use decor for one season and donate it? I don't have the time to do such a thing nor am I that fickle), is there a problem replacing items like furnishings? As long as one recycles/donates/sells stuff, I have no problem with it. No one is taking their dining table's hand in marriage. (Though I have had the toughest time parting with my table)

    Anyway, back on topic, I've found some of the lowest priced purchases give me the greatest pleasure. I've made terrible mistakes with higher priced ones. And vice, versa, of course.

    I'm no expert, but it seems that wool rugs, at the upper reaches, are more about provenance and originality than nuances of quality construction (not to say they are poorly made, but the pricing does not reflect construction, rather other more artistic criteria. yes there is knot count, etc, but my point is that pricing appears to be based on other criteria, like exclusivity and age).

  • IdaClaire
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    My point about "disposable" isn't as much as where it goes, but the attitude that something is better than nothing plus the need for immediate gratification. These two things cost time (wasted because you have to look twice) and money buying two things instead of the one thing you really want (the impact depends on one's financial situation).

    Yes, I definitely see that point. I've fallen victim to the immediate gratification pull too many times myself, as when I bought décor at Home Goods to fill the space on top of my kitchen cabinets, and then turned around and sold several pieces of it less than a year later when I determined I didn't want all of that stuff up there. I did, however, enjoy the pieces during the time that I had them. It pleased me to look up and see the items there. To that end, they served a purpose and while I probably should've just waited until I figured out what I really wanted, I look at it now as one of those "oh well" things in my decorating life. I probably wouldn't be so cavalier if they weren't inexpensive items though!

  • Kitch4me
    5 years ago

    I like the rug, but I'm a fan of white!

    I think mixing styles gives a fresh look, I'm trying to do that in my LR to make it look a little less traditional.



  • beckysharp Reinstate SW Unconditionally
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    is there a problem replacing items like furnishings?

    Not really -- there are a whole host of businesses and industries, from manufacturers and retailers to interior decorators/designers, to HGTV and the late great shelter magazines, that have depended on this desire for their livelihoods : )

    Anyway, back on topic, I've found some of the lowest priced purchases give me the greatest pleasure. I've made terrible mistakes with higher priced ones. And vice, versa, of course.

    Gooster, for me these are some of the truest words in this thread!

  • voila
    5 years ago

    Sorry, mtn, didn't mean to sound so blunt. I think it may be hurricane crankiness. :) Love the quirky runner ! The new purchase seems too cliché and trendy. You have such good taste, and it seems your home calls for some old family history on the floor. Darn folks never left you fabulous Persians? I have the same problem. I agree with the $20,000 rugs not matching the next home décor. That's my dining room rug. But it is too fine to replace with another rug that will also be ill fitting down the road. My latest solution to this problem, for the living room, was buying an Oushak on eBay from a New York dealer with free shipping. It is difficult to see colors, but this dealer showed the reverse side which gives you a truer view of colors. Since the rug was neutral taupe, gray colored I took the leap. Here is the catch, it is tufted instead of 6 million knots per inch hand knotted lots-of-money. And it will be my place holder for quite a while, but no heirloom. Good luck with your beautiful entry and enjoy your purchase.

  • Bonnie
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    I have not read all the replies, but my first thought was "no, that is not adding anything to the beautiful space". To my eyes it is not right and there are better options out there, more along the lines of the beautiful adjacent runner. Sorry, I know this is not what you want to hear!

  • ingrid_vc so. CA zone 9
    5 years ago

    I came upon this company which sells beautiful, very well-made rugs which you can return without shipping cost if you don't like it. It's name is Catalina Rugs. Unless you can afford rugs from Doris Leslie Blau, this company is very friendly and yet has a high-quality product which impressed me.

  • miniscule
    5 years ago

    Your entry hall is lovely. I think the new rug is fine per se, but I prefer the colours and style of the runner. Or perhaps it is that with that runner, which seems to so nicely complement the hall style and your beautiful wood floor, I would prefer to see a table rug with related style and rich deep colours. Do you really need a carpet right away under your table? Maybe wait until you find something you are more sure that you want to keep?

  • chispa
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    You really are rug challenged! < giving you a virtual hug >

    Which is very strange since you are really good at picking out all the other decor items we've seen you choose over the years. The old ripped rug looks like a drop cloth and kind of sad in the space, but I see a theme with the very light color, which isn't what I think would look best in the entry space. It needs something richer to hold its own against the furnishings.

    We need a GW/Houzz intervention! Who is close by and can go rug shopping with Mtn, ... Annie maybe? ;-)

    If you are ever in San Francisco I have a recommendation for an amazing rug dealer. They do have priceless antiques, but also more "reasonable" vintage ones. There must to be good rug dealers in the tri-state area?

    Edit: Oh, and to answer the question, no I don't buy placeholders and take my time to find something that I really love.

  • MtnRdRedux
    Original Author
    5 years ago

    Lol, Chispa you are sweet

  • inthetrees
    5 years ago

    I like it. It looks fresh and clean and soft. It makes me think "winter white." Your floors are beautiful and remain the star of the room, and are even enhanced by the rug.

    My only issue with it would be if it is tufted and sheds. In that case it might be messy and not as easy to clean as knotted wool, and therefore more "disposable." But in that location, shedding may not be an issue and I think you could find another home for it if/when you want a change.

  • patty_cakes42
    5 years ago

    "Yes but do you think, like cheap fashion, it may start a cycle of cheap, disposable decor?"

    Mtn, don't you think we're curretly *living* it and either go with it, or remain 'true to ourselves'? With the ever changing of colors thru accessories in dcorating trends, many homeowners/nesters/dwellers feel the need to 'stay current' even though they may like what they have already. It's the young millennials who buy into what is trending, as they are usually not 'into' antiques or anything they may have had in their home while growing up. Many decorating 'gurus'~aka decorating forum members~want more of an eclectic home, therefore following current trends is not as attractive. *We* seem to have a craving for things with history/family memories/familarity, so may find it more difficult to veer off the path and into the abyss of 'cheap and disposable'. I speak for myself. ;)


  • patty_cakes42
    5 years ago

    Mtn, you're not gonna like the word, but I find the rug too *cheap* looking for your space and detracts, rather than adds anything...sorry for my honesty/bluntness. An ad from Anthropologie came into my email today, and when I saw this I immediately thought of you, especially knowing you prefer a lack of color.

    http://www.anthropologie.com/anthro/product/shopsale-rugs/36383636.jsp#/

  • Sueb20
    5 years ago

    It has occurred to me that Mtn didn't really ask us if we liked the rug.

    I tend to only buy placeholder/temporary decor items if they're trendy or really inexpensive. For example, I wouldn't consider a $1200 rug temporary. But I looked high and low for a small chair for a corner of my living room, and finally found a "good enough until the right one comes along" chair at Target online. I didn't have high expectations for the chair, but when it arrived it was perfect! And people comment on it all the time ("I love that chair!" not "What is that cheap thing doing in your living room?"). I think I paid $60 for it, and maybe 3 years later, it's still here. I've bought stuff like animal-print pillows or cutesy dish towels knowing I'll be tired of them before too long...but they almost always get a second chance, either via goodwill or a friend or the basement (so many of our rejected living room furniture and accessories make their way to our basement family room).

  • PRO
    MDLN
    5 years ago

    I really like your clock!

    The rug, not so much.

  • Nothing Left to Say
    5 years ago

    I guess I think of all decor as somewhat disposable. We have lived in 10 apartments/houses in our twenty years of marriage. Stuff doesn't always work in the new place. Plus I have kids and while I expect them to behave decently, they do make mistakes and stuff gets spilled or something gets drawn on. I don't want anything too precious.


    That said, I try to opt for things that will last some years and donate things that we are done with.

  • User
    5 years ago

    I do think we live in a disposable world. When my parents were married, you bought really good stuff and you intended to keep it "forever"! And as you got a bigger house, you got more furniture. Now, with so many outlets selling so much "cheap" (inexpensive) merchandise, it is not a "forever" purchase but rather for the season or until one tires of it. I remember toasters and coffeepots were a "one time" purchase. Now they are disposable -- if yours stops working, you just pitch and buy a new one. Decor is like that too -- especially holiday decor (any holiday, Fourth of July, Halloween, Thanksgiving and of course, Christmas). It's what is trendy that year. I know one lady who buys all new Christmas decorations each year -- she has a theme (usually by color) and instead of packing it all away, she puts it in a garage sale in the spring. She wants it gone so she can come up with something different next year.


    I also have a friend who buys new living room furniture every three or four years. It's not worn, it's not broken. She's just tired of it and wants something different.


    And some of that disposable has something to do with trends in the marketplace. And that's what they want you to do -- change your decor to the "latest" and "greatest"!


    If you don't think "life" is disposable, just drive past a garage sale -- and see the stuff they offer for sale. Even thirty years ago, that wouldn't happen.


    Martha

  • Arapaho-Rd
    5 years ago

    I like it and I may be in the minority, but hear is why I do. It doesn't compete with anything and for that reason the floor, furniture, etc. stands out and takes center stage. You could add any color to the entry with that rug and it would work. It gives the entry a serene feeling as you enter the home. In terms of disposable or not, if it gives the look and feel you want and is satisfactory in quality, then why not? I grow tired of things anyway, so to spend more would make me feel like I'd have to live with it longer or find another home for it in the house.

  • Nothing Left to Say
    5 years ago

    As far as things being different thirty years ago, well a lot of stuff is different. I think we have become increasingly mobile. Two houses in a lifetime. Ha. Like I said we are on ten in twenty years. Very little works in every house. And we have gone from small to pretty big to small to. . . And from 1926 to 2016 and everything in between with a variety of architecture. Really, very little works in every house.

  • MtnRdRedux
    Original Author
    5 years ago

    SueB,

    LOL, you are right and the only one who noticed that my question was actually about disposable decor, not about my rug. But I figured since almost no one read it that way, I must have written it wrong, and I would just go with it.

    It has been in situ a couple of days, and when I walk by it, I find myself thinking "I don't know ...I like it."

    Is the rug special and wonderful? No. I firmly believe that the ideal rug would be a vintage Oushak, or a good fake vintage Oushak. The former is 20k+ and the latter is maybe 7k ish, at least 5k. I'm not willing to do that, probably because in the back of my mind I expect we might move back into the city in 5yrs or so when the youngest goes to college, and if we do I will have so much excess stuff. I have had my eye for 5 years and not found any bargains that would give me that vintage look.

    In any event, thanks everyone for your comments and no worries for those of you who worried you were "blunt". : )

  • Bonnie
    5 years ago

    I think you had us at the "yay or nay?", and while you weren't specifically asking about the rug, in a sense you were asking about disposable and inferring that your choice of rug would fall into that category. Enjoy the rug!

  • LisaD82
    5 years ago

    You like it! That's all that matters.

    We experience such guilt on this forum when we like something that's trendy or perhaps not "true" to the home or its surroundings.

    In this thread, you've received every reason *not* to keep it. If, after reading all of this, you still walk by it and think "I like it," then keep it. Done.

  • LisaD82
    5 years ago

    P.S. I like burlap! I'm sorry but I do!

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