Arrowwood Viburnum Anyone?

wisconsitom(Zone 4/5)

So, I'm designing this smallish shrub grouping and would really like to use one or more arrowwood viburnum cultivars. Meanwhile, the imported pest-viburnum leaf beetle-is yet another foreign insect making its way across the country. There are reports from
Wisconsin, near Milwaukee. I live and work 100 miles north of that city. So I ask, would I be a big fool-or just a little idiot-to still be planting this shrub in this composition? I've read and re-read all the pertinent info. I know of at least one very major grower in this state that has moved away from offering this plant. What think ye all? Anybody else here from the Upper Midwest/Great Lakes states with an opinion one way or the other?

Thanks...................+oM

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WoodsTea 6a MO(6a)

Hmm, that's too bad about the beetle. I'd been looking at planting a couple of V. dentatum this fall. UW Extension seems to think it's a bad idea there in Wisconsin:

http://hort.uwex.edu/articles/viburnum-leaf-beetle

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wisconsitom(Zone 4/5)

Yeah, I was in communication with our University Extension Entomologist. The trend seems clear, the threat is real. This little task is within the stormwater mgt. vegetation portion of my job, and we nearly always select native plants for these projects, all the way up to and including selecting seed for meadow grasses and forbs from within a couple hundred miles. This location however, is in a straight-up residential neighborhood-nice houses were torn down to build this pond-and considerably more leeway applies in terms of plant palette. I don't mean by that that I ever feel limited by the natives-only aspect of this work, but that landscape nativars and even cultivars of non-natives may be used. In any case, it might be time to look at options.

+oM

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wisconsitom(Zone 4/5)

Woods, et al, the very person referenced above sent me an email this morning, more or less urging me not to back away from planting this fine shrub. His reasoning-something I'd already considered-is the ease of control of this insect when on just a few plants. So, even though I do virtually no actual landscape maintenance in my job these days, it would not be unreasonable that a brief inspection or two in fall, winter, or early spring, to look for the "egg caps" on the twig ends could easily be managed. Think I'm going to go with my initial impulse, in that this group of plants is really the right one to go with the other items I have selected for this job. Even just applying Tanglefoot to the lower stems would completely block reinfestation should it occur, the larvae not dropping to the ground to pupate as so many insects do, but rather, crawling down the trunk, so to speak, to get to ground. That really suggests a simple management regime. Yeah!


+oM

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Liz(Zone 7/NJ)

I am in central New Jersey, and the beetle has shown up in New York State, but I have gone ahead and planted Arrowwood. There are only two in my backyard, plus two viburnum nudum. So far so good, and I figure I can do control as you suggest in the wintertime if the beetles show up.

The variety deamii is very pretty, with larger glossy leaves.

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wisconsitom(Zone 4/5)

Thanks Liz. I like that one too (deamii) but am purposely limiting my choices to easily-sourced plants this go-round. I have other projects where I can satisfy my lust for the more unusual.

I've had a rather amazing range of responses to more or less this same query when talking directly to some of my state's leading experts, all the way from 'I would absolutely not " be planting AWVs to 'go ahead and plant them, VLB is easy to control'.........the latter from our state entomologist whom I referenced above. I'm not usually about setting us up for a later hardship, but this planting is small, discreet, and honestly, I think we've got at least a few years before that menace makes itself known here. And e ven then, I should be able to manage. In case you can't tell, I really like AWV!

+oM

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