Can wine be bottled in crown-cap beer bottles?

arley_gw

Greetings all:

I'm fairly experienced in home brewing but I've never made any wine. I'm thinking about trying my hand at it.

Real basic question: rather than investing in corking tools and wine bottles, can you simply use 22 oz beer bottles and use a crown cap closure, just as you would for beer making?

Restating that, what advantage, if any, does a wine cork have over a bottle cap?

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Suzi AKA DesertDance So CA Zone 9b(9b)

Well, they bottle wine in screw caps, so as long as you are sure there is no more yeast growing, and all is quiet, you could probably do it. Go over to winepress and ask this question. The experts are there.

Here is a link that might be useful: Referral Link for wine makers and growers

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rosesinny(7a)

Corks expand to fit the neck of the bottle, providing a tight seal. There were no comparable materials when that was discovered, so they've become the closure of choice. A good cork, in wine that is properly stored, can last many many years.

Crown caps are less secure. My guess, and it's only a guess, is that if as mentioned above, the wine is finished, you can probably use a crown cap for a short time.

I don't know the stats for air transpiration with screw caps either. How long can you store something sealed with crown caps?

Corks are not ideal closures IMO. Personally, I love the idea of screw tops because corks have plenty of problems. But they do have a track record, so assuming you have good corks, you've at least got history on your side.

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rosesinny(7a)

Look for Berger Gruner Veltliner. One liter bottle, crown cap.

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myk1(5 IL)

I've had sparkling cherry wine in 12oz beer bottles for many years. Sour cherries so it took about 5 years of aging before they were drinkable. It has held it's carbonation so I assume they are tight.

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laura_fl(8.5)

Similar question. Can you use the beer capper to put beer caps onto 750 ml wine bottles? My husband is making mead now and I was wondering if we wanted to put some of it into wine bottles if we could cap it like he does with regular beer bottles.

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spaceman13(6b)

I found a bottle of stout, and a bottle of red ale homebrew I made in my basement. They were 8 and 10 years old respectively

Both retained carbonation, which means they remained integrity
I chilled and drank both with no ill effects.

I also have used 12 oz Bud returnables and non-returnables for still Cyser and still hard cider (no carbonation) that I heat pasteurized.

It will not win you any style points, but should work just fine.

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sheryl_ontario(Muncho Lake, BC z2)

This is great! I think I might do this with some of my wine too!

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chas045(7b)

laura_fl, if I understand your question correctly, bottle caps won't seal because regular wine bottles have no rounded lip for the cap to grip around.

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apg4

Crown caps will do fine. I have made sparkling wine in the "methode champenoise" process in which the wine undergoes secondary fermentation in the bottle - champagne bottles. The bottles are "riddled": stored neck down and turned every so often to concentrate the lees at the neck. The final cork closure is put in later.

Bottles that can accommodate crown caps can usually handle a bit of pressure. But there is a mighty fine line between a sparkling wine and hand grenades.

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tonykimuk

I helped my father make wine during my entire youth. He had upwards of 1000 ginger ale bottles (still have over 500 with wine in them dating back to the 70's), and I helped him cap many of them using a simple hand press with beer caps that were lined with cork. I just opened a bottle of 93 vintage today, and it tastes beyond belief good. He never added sulfites to his wine, just pure grapes, fermented in a wood barrel for a year then bottled the next year. So, an occasional bottle would go bad, and it would land up in the vinegar barrel for some of the best vinegar to be had. So, old fashion cork beer bottle tops, if they can still be purchased, seems to be a good choice. Actually, the cork I took off this bottle was cork lined and said Lemon Lime Soda on its top. Who knows where he got these corks things from. Oh, he stored all the bottles in a cellar, just standing up. Of course, there was build up on the bottom of each bottle that was not drinkable. One just carefully poured from the storing bottle, into the serving bottle to not get any of the stuff which had built up over the years at the bottom of the bottle.

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