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organic_donna9

Best Place To Retire???? How about Asheville NC?

organic_donna
13 years ago

Help,

I'm retireing in 8 years and want to move out of Chicago. I'm a city gal through and through and now I feel it's getting too difficult to meet new friends. I live in a high rise and never see any of my neighbors.

I've been doing a lot of research on the internet for the best place to retire. These are my top requirements: Cool climate, water, i.e. lakes, rivers, close to a town with a lot of fun things to do, (I want an open minded town), animals allowed, and NO GOLF COURSE communities.

I just returned from Asheville N.C. I was looking at vacant land to build a house on in the mountains. I was very surprised at what I found when I visited the small town. It is very artsy! They are into yoga, organic foods, alternative lifesyles and they seem very open minded. I really liked the people.

I'm scared to death to make the move from a big city to a small town. Do any of you know much about Ashville? How about Santa Fe NM or Sedona AZ?

Where should I go? San Fransico is too expensive.

Donna

Here is a link that might be useful: Asheville NC

Comments (66)

  • stargazzer
    13 years ago

    I would love a small town. Sounds you have already seen things you like. I think you will be happy there unless you want more cultural things than it offers. I like the quiet, seeing familiar faces, walking or biking rather than drive the car every where. Knowing what I know, I would settle in the mid west because it is less expensive and would leave me more spending money for travel. I bought a new 2800 sq ft home for $165,000. I probably couldn't afford it's equal on either coast.

  • organic_donna
    Original Author
    13 years ago

    Thank you all for your replies.
    I was hopeing to find a Ashville resident. Thank you pink-overalls for the excellent information. I found a subdivision called Crest Mountain. It's very woodsy and mountainous. I also found the perfect lot to build a future home. I am going to make a decision on the lot in the next month or so. Am I crazy as I've only been there one time? It is not an easy trip coming from Chicago. Going back several times would not really help much. What I'm thinking is I would purchase the lot now and sell my condo in the next 4 years or so. Then I would move to Asheville and rent for a while. That way I would really know if I like it or not. If it's not for me, I sell the lot and move on somewhere else. I've done it before. I sold a house 6 months after moving because I didn't like the lifestyle.
    pink-overalls, I love what you said "There's probably more acupuncturists, hynotherapists, chiropractors, naturopaths, astrologers, and other alternative healers than you'll find in similar-sized cities". That's me to a tee. I love all the tatooed and pierced hippies. I am a very free spirited person. I also like the large gay population. Being a flight attendant all of my best friends are gay men. I love Asheville's "live and let live" attitude. I was surprised by that way of thinking for such a small town.
    Thank you all for your replies. Arizona is where my only family lives. It's way too hot for me there. Sedona sounds too hot and expensive and Santa Fe may be too Aztec for my taste. My dream town is San Fransico, but I'm not wealthy enough to afford it there. Seatle rains too much!
    Donna

    Here is a link that might be useful: Crest Mountain

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  • organic_donna
    Original Author
    13 years ago

    The paper mill is 17.6 miles away, is that too close?
    Donna

  • joyfulguy
    13 years ago

    Skunk stink doesn't travel as far as paper mills'.

    Friend's canine (female - rambunctious) mixed some with a skunk while visiting a few days ago ... but it was a minor touch ... and she was bearable.
    o j

  • joann23456
    13 years ago

    Organic_Donna, I hear you on the crunchy granola hippie thing. I haven't been to Asheville for 25 years (back when it was just a beautiful small town in the mountains), but one concern I've heard from hippie-type friends who think Asheville might be pretty close to utopia is that there's very little racial diversity. As one person put it, you don't see African American, Asian or Hispanic people. It's diverse, as long as you consider white hippies, white goths, and white artists to constitute a diverse community.

    I have no idea if this is true or if it matters to you, but it's something to consider.

  • organic_donna
    Original Author
    13 years ago

    joann,
    It's weird that you said that about Ashville not being diverse. I was on the phone with my friend who is African American and she asked me, "how many black people did you see? How about "Hispanic or Asians". I do think that the lack of ethnic diversity would bother me.
    I met with my financial advisor today and he pretty much talked me out of buying the lot. He said by financing the land it would put a huge strain on my already tight monthly budget. He said if this was my lifelong dream to go for it. Since I've only been to Ashville one time and stayed a day and a half I could conclude that it's not my dream. He said a lot can change in 6 years and I should wait until I'm closer to the time to retire.
    It sounds like good advice.
    Donna

  • pink_overalls
    13 years ago

    Organic Donna, I'm supporting your financial advisor. When I looked at the website for Crest Mountain, it didn't seem like the kind of community for a granola gal. Gated community with covenants? Come on, where's that ole free spirit? What you want to do is rent an old house downtown where you can bike around to the local galleries, pubs and parks. You're wasting your hard earned money buying land and building new when you can get a previously owned house for much less with plenty of character and all the kinks worked out. New is over-rated.

    I didn't mention the gay population because, you know, it can be a touchy subject, and people have strong opinions. Same with religion. Although Asheville's known for it's supposed open-mindedness, there is a very strong conservative, Bible-belt element, too. Blacks may be a minority there, but not THAT small a minority. There is a growing labor force of South Americans. It ain't Brooklyn, but it ain't Iowa, either. You want all-white, go to Seattle.

    I think anyone would be free-spirited to a fault to retire to a place she'd been to only once briefly. The aroma of the paper mills can be nonexistent one day, unpleasant the next. There's lots of research you can do online about climate, demographics, cost of living, health care quality, cultural attractions, housing, retail scene, job opportunities, etc.

    To the folks complaining about humidity -- have you heard about air conditioning? It changes everything. Summer heat isn't a problem is the NC mountains. Where I am now (retired and staying put) on the NC coast, it's hot and humid for 3 months of the year. You do your gardening in the morning, that's all. We don't need winter coats and snow shovels, so its worth it.

    Good luck Organic Donna, in your search. Keep up the research and I bet you'll settle in Asheville. -- from pink overalls, a granola cruncher herself

  • organic_donna
    Original Author
    13 years ago

    pink-overalls,
    You have helped me so much with this dilema. I emailed the developer and he still wants me to keep an open mind about the land purchase.
    I just returned for the Museum of Science and Industry, where the "Green House", by Michelle Kaufman was set up. She also designed a ranch style house called the Sunset Breezehouse. I was going to do a similiar design and have it built in Asheville. It fits perfectly on the lot in Crest Mountain.
    The developer wants me to spend more time in Asheville. It's not an easy trip due to work and having two cats that I won't leave alone for more than 3 days. I really feel like I need to put Asheville away for the time being. I have 8 years until I retire and a lot can change in that time. Asheville seems like a very small town compared to downtown Chicago. I'm tired of thinking about retirement. I need to try and enjoy the present.
    Thanks again for all of your input,
    Donna

    Here is a link that might be useful: Sunset Breezehouse

  • sjerin
    13 years ago

    But Donna, how could you POSSIBLY leave that beautiful blue kitchen???

  • organic_donna
    Original Author
    13 years ago

    sjern,
    Thank you for the compliment, yes I have thought about that very same thing. I just finished the bathroom remodel last year. I would really miss my Blue Bahia countertops.
    As they say, nothing lasts forever.
    Donna
    P.S. Did you click on the Sunset Breezehouse. I think I could make that house into a really special place.

  • mariend
    13 years ago

    Tonight, April 22 on HGTV on house hunters they are featuring the city you are inquiring about--Ashville NC. Featuring "green houses" You probably can review it on the Computer if you miss it.

  • western_pa_luann
    13 years ago

    from city-data.com

    Races in Asheville:

    * White Non-Hispanic (76.0%)
    * Black (17.6%)
    * Hispanic (3.8%)
    * Two or more races (1.6%)
    * Other race (1.5%)
    * American Indian (0.8%)

  • jennmonkey
    13 years ago

    Seattle is hardly all-white. Asheville has 76% white population, and Seattle has 68%.

    I understand your concern about the rain, but I just looked it up and Seattle has an average of 37.1 inches of rain per year and Asheville has an average of 38 inches of rain per year.

    You should take a look at Olympia, WA....it's a beautiful town that sounds very similar to Asheville IMO. It's got a very hippy college there (Evergreen State College), and it has an interesting mix of folks....since it's also the state capitol. I love Olympia and hope to move back down there someday to get out of the bustle of Seattle.

  • organic_donna
    Original Author
    13 years ago

    Wow,
    Thanks so much for taking the time to give me so much information. I do love the mountains in NC and the cool climate. I also like the Seattle area very much. I think it's too soon to make a informed decision. The problem is I can't visit many places because I won't leave my cats alone for more than a few days. At least I was able to go and see Asheville.
    I will read over all of your posts again, you gave me so much good information to dissect.
    Donna

  • organic_donna
    Original Author
    13 years ago

    I just wanted to add a few words,
    I look at life as being divided into 3 parts, retirement being the last 1/3 of my life. I didn't do a very good job on the first 2/3's of my life. I wasn't very mature and made a lot of not so great choices. I have one last chance to "get it right" this time around. I want to take all the lessons I've learned and make good and positive choices in the last 1/3 of my life.
    The place I choose to retire will be a VERY important decision in my life. The friends I make and people I meet will influence my happiness a great deal. I'll be moving all by myself which is a little more scary than moving with a spouse. I hope this time around I've learned enough to find a place that will enrich my life. Thank you for all the helpful advice.
    Donna

  • jemdandy
    13 years ago

    I have a cousin who lives near Portland, OR (Beaverton) - he loves it; Been there most of his life. Hunts and fish 2/3 of the year.

    I have a niece and her husband who moved to Seattle, WA and was there only one year. It was cold and rainy the entire winter, their new car began to corrode, living costs were too high for their budget, and she could not find a decent job. They have two young children, the youngest just staring school. They were unhappy.

    They moved to Austin, TX, and are hotter but happier and richer. Both have found good paying jobs and living costs are within their budget.

    I've vacationed 3 times in Oregon and once in Washinton state. My pick: Oregon west of the Cascade mountains. Eastern Oregon is a high, dry semi-desert with a winter. Seattle is an earthquake zone. The part of Oregon that borders Nevada is, well, like nothern Nevada.

    The Willamette valley can get quite hot in summer, hitting the 90's F during afternoons in July.

    Eugene and Corvallis are worth a look. If you prefer the ocean, there are many places along the Pacific coast. It is frequented by the cold Japanese current. Next to the shore, a cold fog can roll in at any time, but sunny days are glorious. My advice: Do not settle too close to shore. Winter storms on the ocean can be feroucious. Rocks dashed against the headland have been known to bounce as high as 60 ft high (as recorded by a broken window in a lighthouse).

    On the average, I liked the people whom I met in Oregon. They have their own laid-back style of viewing life.

  • liz
    13 years ago

    Donna...the gals I fly with are all around my age and we all talk about retiring and where we wanna live and such I love the idea moving to a small town and buying a huge old house and making it a home for wayward old skyhags...if it ever happens...we'll look you up! Check out this town...it's become my dream town...The best to you in your search and I hope to be putting down my skyshoes in about 12 years!

    Here is a link that might be useful: Madison, Georgia

  • kitstar
    13 years ago

    Well I don't know if you want another opinion or not but here's mine. :-) There are a TON of deals on forclosed homes right now. We're working with a realtor now in FL because we want to buy a place to retire to in a few years but we want to get the jump on buying one now while the market is down. If you go to hotpads dot com and type in the area you're looking in and all of your housing specs something will come up. We have access to private listings right now because of our realtor but after awhile they all go on the open market eventually. Prices are outrageously low for some really gorgeous homes. Check out the hotpads site and then get in touch with a realtor.
    Good luck with whatever you decide to do. You're making a wise decision to get out of chicago though. Il is a tough state to retire in.

    Here is a link that might be useful: boomfox

  • organic_donna
    Original Author
    13 years ago

    Thank you for the great recommendations, I'll definately check the places out. I still have 8 years to go so it's too soon to purchase a house, that's why I was looking at vacant land.
    What started this whole journey was a excellent book I read, "How To Retire Happy, Wild, and Free by Ernie Zelinski. It was a very positive, wonderful book and I highly suggest reading it.
    Donna

  • Sally Brownlee
    13 years ago

    Of all the states I have visited, I think NC is one of the best to retire. (looking stictly on the East coast)
    Some of them are:

    Boone - nice college town in the mountains - very liberal
    Asheville - I think this is a neat place to visit, but too
    big of a city for me.
    Southern Pines (love this little place!)
    Pinehurst - this and SP really run together, but TONS of
    golf!

    I really love a few in SC too,

    Aiken - Magnificent homes and history( Nuclear facility
    nearby)
    Beaufort - lovely old homes and trees. on the water, near
    Parris Island - (US Marine training)
    Greenville - more city-like and culturally growing

  • Rudebekia
    13 years ago

    This thread has me thinking: has anyone here done what organic donna is plannning to do? Move somewhere completely different for retirement and do so alone? I'm not sure I'd be brave enough to do so... I'd love to hear some experiences.

  • organic_donna
    Original Author
    13 years ago

    salgal,
    You made me laugh when you said Asheville is too big a city. That's what scares me the most. It's a tiny city compared to where I live.
    marita,
    I'm scared to death to move away from Chicago. I don't have any family here anymore and just a few friends. My sister moved to a over 55 community a few years ago. She has made so many friends and she's always doing something fun. That gives me hope. I would move close to her but I hate Arizona's heat.
    I've been forced to learn to be alone in the last several years. Friends and family moved away. At first it was really difficult. It took me some time to adjust. Now I am much stronger emotionally and I like my own company.
    My cats are great company too. I would love to one day add a dog.

    I've learned to always be grateful for what I have not what I don't have. If I start to feel sad I remind myself how lucky I am just to be healthy. I go down the list of all the things I have to be grateful for and I always feel much better. The one thing I miss is coming home and telling someone that I am home and safe. You know, when you call home and say "I'll be home in a little while". I don't have anyone to say that to.
    Donna



  • minnie_tx
    13 years ago

    I wouldn't be afraid of the heat in Arizona you'll spend most of your time indoors anyway or by a pool

    if your sister is having such a great time why not give it a try at least there ould be mutual people to enjoy or talk about etc.

  • kitstar
    13 years ago

    Donna, I live in AZ and yes it is really hot in the summertime but if you have a pool and good a/c you hardly notice after a while. :-) You could still move to AZ without living in the valley though. There are still cheaper places here in the Northern country. Flagstaff is the biggest Northern town but pricey, it's a college town. Prescott is a good place in between Flagstaff and Phoenix and prices have come down. There are small lakes and rivers near Prescott and it gets four seasons just like Flag. It's not as pretty as Flag but it has some really pretty sides to it. Stay away from Prescott valley if you do start to look there, nothing wrong with it it's just on the newer side and not as pretty as the older side. One of the coolest, prettiest places is the Show Low area, the white mtns are GORGEOUS with beautiful, COLD, clear lakes and streams and beautiful GREEN meadows. You definitely get four seasons there but the only thing is Show Low isn't all that big..I can't remember exactly how big it is but another great site to check data on cities is called citi-data dot com. Just type in any city or state and it will give you all the data you need about anything. i.e. crime, job markets, average ages of people that live in a certain area etc, it will also tell you the ratio of ethnic to whites etc. Very handy to look at when considering a move.

    Good luck and if I can think of any other helpful sites I'll post them here. :-)

    Here is a link that might be useful: boomfox

  • msmagoo
    13 years ago

    DH is set to retire in 4 years, we live in VA, but hate the cold weather and winters here. It is just now getting warmer. We've been looking at places around Charleston, North Charleston, Summerville, Mount Pleasant, we are going to visit and look around in the fall. We live in a small town now and would like a larger area with more stuff to do. I'd love to hear if anyone knows about these areas. I checked out the link for Madison GA, but it seems to small. One thing I think you will find about small towns, is their response to "outsiders", it is like that where we live, kinda cliqueish(sp).

  • organic_donna
    Original Author
    13 years ago

    minnie you said, "I wouldn't be afraid of the heat in Arizona you'll spend most of your time indoors anyway or by a pool"
    That is so not me. I don't want to spend time indoors and I hate air conditioning. I don't like being by the pool either. Hot weather makes me physically ill. I was in AZ one summer and it was 110. I couldn't take the heat. It was 80 in Chicago last week and it was too hot for me. I don't like it any warmer that 60.
    I'm sorry if I sound harsh but I know my body and I don't tolerate heat at all.
    I'll look at Flagstaff though, I just want to be where there are 4 seasons and on the colder side.
    Donna

  • minnie_tx
    13 years ago

    I think it might be a good idea to make a list of just what you want to do during the daytime and evenings. Do you want to be in a club atmosphere where activities are planned for you as part of a group? or do you want the easy access to museums, zoos musical events such as concerts and broadway type shows. Do you want an active church life? will you feel "stuck" when there is only one of each type of store? Do you enjoy going to art shows and street markets? would you be willing to drive 20-30 miles to another town to enjoy some things they might offer? these kind of questions.
    These are things a lot of us have to face Forgot to mention what about transportation? do you have your own wheels? or would you depend on public service

  • organic_donna
    Original Author
    13 years ago

    minnie,
    Yes, thank you, I did make a list.
    Donna

  • trinitytx
    13 years ago

    I also second the Oregon/Washington states for a looksee.
    Portland, a place I spent 21 years in is exactly what you describe. Another possiblity would be Ellensburg Washington, a really great niche in a valley of mountains.
    Both remind me of the good ol hippie days, and no one seems to judge your lifestyle. Live and let live. Sweet and simple.

    You do have some time to travel and look, please give both of these a try. You will not be sorry.

    Trin

  • sjerin
    13 years ago

    I second trinitytx's recommendation!

  • organic_donna
    Original Author
    13 years ago

    I really appreciate all of your recommendations. I will be giving all the locations another look. There are so many good books on this subject.
    I've decided that when I'm ready to retire I will put my condo on the market first and then go rent a place before I make a commitment to buy. That way if it's not for me I can easily undo the decision. It's kind of scary to think of moving to a different city. I do have some time to research more.
    Donna

  • hannaht
    12 years ago

    Organic_Donna, I hear you on the crunchy granola hippie thing. I haven't been to Asheville for 25 years (back when it was just a beautiful small town in the mountains), but one concern I've heard from hippie-type friends who think Asheville might be pretty close to utopia is that there's very little racial diversity. As one person put it, you don't see African American, Asian or Hispanic people. It's diverse, as long as you consider white hippies, white goths, and white artists to constitute a diverse community.

    I have no idea if this is true or if it matters to you, but it's something to consider.

    Here is a link that might be useful: How To Retire At 40

  • Sharon
    6 years ago

    Seeing this late in discussions. Weighing in very late here. Thought about Asheville, but decided on Prescott AZ. Much different than Phoenix area, 4 mild seasons, next to the Prescott National forest, one of 4 Benificial dog parks in the nation recipient of a $500,00 doggie park make over (yes that was 1/2 million dollars) has history (first territorial capital of AZ) and recently celebrated it's 150th anniversary,and to boot has a small time feel. World oldest rodeo here too. Building our forever home here.

  • jemdandy
    6 years ago

    As more retirees move to Arizona, potable water gets more scarce. Be sure there is a secure and plentiful water source at your choice of location. Sedona is a very nice location, but through the years, it has become 'artsy' and and may be outside the budget. Phoenix is just plain too hot and too much population to be supportable by available resources. Forget about languishing in the pool in Phoenix. Your skin will burn to a crisp and age fast unless the pool is shaded. Phoenix does have the amenities of other large cities.

    Sedona has hummingbirds.

    Arizona appeals to outdoor types such as hikers, photographers, and rock-hounds. If you will miss green deciduous forests, grassy fields, and shady bubbling brooks, Arizona is not for you. It has desert plants, sand and dust, cactus thorns in the soil, and where there is a bit of water, there may be scrub oaks.

    Flagstaff is at higher altitude (up on the rim). It is cooler than the low altitude parts, but it has winter and snow.

  • angelaid_gw
    6 years ago

    So, where are you going to end up?

  • Elaine D
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    organic_donna Did you ever find that happy retirement place? If so, where is it? I want to know about Asheville and other places myself. I live in Phoenix area and it's too hot for too long. Winter is lovely, but the summer is brutal. Not how I want to spend my retirement years. I have been looking everywhere from Prescott, (too much like AZ where I live of course), Flagstaff, (too much winter, too expensive, (ShowLow, too remote, not enough to do like Asheville), Portland, Eugene OR, Not Seattle or Washington due to expense, Utah, SLC area, inversion in winter is terrible, Sun is intense at higher elevations there. I looked into TN, but seems to depressed and the places I do like have high crime. Sedona AZ is too expensive and not cool enough for me. Please tell me where you ended up as I am curious to know if it worked for you. jemdandy, I looked at Flagstaff, despite the crazy winters. It's way over the top expensive for a low pension retiree such as myself. I do miss the Northeast trees as well. I have a concern about water supplies too. I looked at Sedona, but I think it would also be too expensive.

  • Lewis Slagle
    5 years ago

    Asheville is pretty darn cool

    I have loved it my whole life.

  • lucky0003
    5 years ago

    I'm glad I don't have to decide where to go for retirement, althoug living in a new place would be exciting. So far my kids and new grandson live close by so I can't leave our horrible Midwest weather!

    Do most people move to a new place for retirement because their kids moved away? Just curious!

  • jemdandy
    5 years ago

    I thought this post was familiar. It was started back in 2009. I.m wondering what was the reason to dig this one up again instead of starting a new post. Something interesting in it I suppose?

  • kittymoonbeam
    5 years ago

    I stayed a summer in the mountains of NC. I would live there. People were nice there. Every place has its good and bad. Flagstaff is pretty too but I didn't stay awhile there. You are right. San Francisco is a fun city but expensive. Everyone should visit at least once. Don't spend all your time in the tourist areas. That's not the best part and make sure to see Muir Woods. I'm near Disneyland and I try and go to SF at least once a year. Come and see Yosemite Valley on the same trip. Everyone needs to see Yosemite and the Grand canyon. You will never forget it I promise.

    Everyone says how great our weather is but I would like to be in some trees and have some rivers and some rain. I suppose I would like it more if electric cars replace gas ones to stop the pollution. There is a sign at the Grand Canyon blaming reduced visability on CA smog and I wish we could stop it. No one wants to give up their cars and ride a train or a bus. I wouldn't like to nearer LA, I wouldn't feel safe. Safety is a big factor for single ladies.

    There are so many great places to live in the US. Find someone to watch your kitties and go find one you love.

  • Rosefolly
    4 years ago

    Funny, Asheville is on our short list, too. Given that we would be coming from Bay Area California the prices seem very reasonable to us. I do realize that it is a matter of perspective. I grew up in western Pennsylvania where housing is much cheaper than in Asheville.

    Anyway, I'm actually looking forward to having four seasons, so as long as winter is not too long or too severe, which seems to be the case there. Time will tell. And we have not yet made that decision.


    I wonder what Organic Donna ended up deciding to do. It must be around her retirement time now, since this thread is several years old. But it doesn't look as though she is actively posting anymore. I do hope she found her happy place!


    Rosefolly

  • Alisande
    4 years ago

    I was happy to see Organic Donna back at the KT again--until I realized this thread is eight years old! Does anyone know if Donna posts under another name here at Houzz?

  • gardengal48 (PNW Z8/9)
    4 years ago

    I know this comment is very much after the fact but I would just like to offer Seattle and the greater Puget Sound area as a wonderful place to retire. I have lived here my entire life and while I have traveled extensively across the country, there is nowhere else I would consider living.

    First, the area is extremely scenic.......make that drop-dead gorgeous!! Anywhere you might choose to settle will provide views to mountains and natural areas and you are never more than a few miles away from water.........lots of water!! The Sound, many lakes and rivers and streams. Because of the geography (nothing here is really flat), view properties are plentiful. Any outdoor activity you are interested in - skiing and other winter sports, hiking, camping, hunting, boating, etc. - can be easily addressed without any extensive car travel. Second is the weather. Most who have never lived here have huge misconceptions about the weather. IMO, it is excellent. Never too hot, never too cold and contrary to common opinion, it does NOT rain here constantly!! In fact, total average annual rainfall in Seattle is much lower than many other places in the US. Summers are sunny and very dry........winters damp and cool and snow infrequent. Seldom a need for any A/C and no summer humidity. There are 4 distinct seasons and each offers its own attractions. And no strange weather issues that generate ferocious storms.......no hurricanes, no tornadoes and while we do exist on a major fault line, earthquakes are extremely rare.

    Seattle is a vibrant, active and very cosmopolitan city. Lots of cultural activities, a major sports center and a foodie paradise. Yes, it is expense to live in town but there are scores of smaller communities within easy access of the city that are far less expensive. I live across the Sound, just a quick ferry ride away from downtown Seattle but a world away in terms of a rural feel and reduced cost of living. Puget Sounders for the most part are extremely well educated, entrepreneurial, friendly, and polite and many have a very artistic bent with many smaller communities known for their support of the arts.

    In short, living in the Puget Sound/greater Seattle area will provide all the advantages of a big city (colleges, employment, superb medical care, museums, theatres, restaurants and shopping) combined with a very strong community feel of the smaller, more rural and very scenically located surrounding towns. What's not to like ??

  • imstillchloecat
    4 years ago

    What an amazing re-generation of an old thread! I've visited Asheville but I could never live there. It's way too Bohemian and small-town-clique-ish.

  • Kathsgrdn
    4 years ago

    Now I want to live in Seattle. lol

  • Olychick
    4 years ago

    gardengal....shhhhhhhh! There are too many people here already!

  • gardengal48 (PNW Z8/9)
    4 years ago

    LOL!! very true :-)) In fact most of my recent client base has been new-to-the-area residents. And most of them of retirement age.........I think many have already figured out this is a wonderful place to spend one's golden years!!

  • nicole___
    4 years ago

    Why are you posting to a 2009 thread?

  • gardengal48 (PNW Z8/9)
    4 years ago

    Why not?? Is the subject not as interesting or meaningful for somebody today as it was 6-7 year ago?? People still retire and look for a nice place to live out their golden years.......just because the OP may not still be around or actively looking for a place to retire does not mean the topic is any less appropriate or not worthy of additional comment. Others apparently think so............

    What's it to you anyway? There is no time limit to these threads :-))