Need Help Identify Plant

mafghine(8)

I just moved into a place (1 acre) full of flowers and planrs from the previous owner.

Im trying to identify the plants.Any help is grateful.

I found this one growing very strongly in the ditch. Any ideas?

SaveComment4Like
Comments (4)
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Chemocurl zn5b/6a Indiana(zone 5/6)

Hi mafghine,

I suggest you try asking at the link below.

Be sure to mention your state, since you don't have it listed along with your zone.

Here is a link that might be useful: Name that Plant Forum.

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
agardenstateof_mind(USDA Zone 7 (Coastal NJ))

Can't be certain, but that really looks like a type of ginger, which may be winter hardy in your region. Check (gently) just below the soil surface for some rhizomes (possibly similar to what you see sold in the grocery store). Ginger likes a warm, moist environment ... so the ditch would be perfect.

This would not be our native "wild ginger" which is asarum, but more likely zingiber.

This post was edited by agardenstateof_mind on Wed, Nov 13, 13 at 0:34

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
dbarron(z7_Arkansas)

Hedychium coronarium...but certainly not a native :)

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
mafghine(8)

ty all

Save    
Browse Gardening and Landscaping Stories on Houzz See all Stories
Gardening for Birds Backyard Birds: How to Identify Two Common Woodpeckers
Downy and hairy woodpeckers have similar coloration and behavior. But there are two big differences that separate them
Full Story
Flowers and Plants Help Monarchs and Other Butterflies by Planting Common Milkweed
Summer-blooming Asclepias syriaca is an important larval host plant for the monarch butterfly and attracts a number of pollinating insects
Full Story
Gardening Guides Great Design Plant: Common Boneset Helps Good Bugs Thrive
Support bees, moths and butterflies with the nectar of this low-maintenance, versatile and tactile prairie-style plant
Full Story