Orchids of North America

uroboros5(Z5 Quebec)

A family friend loves to take photos of native North American Orchids. I helped him post the photos on the web. They are fantastic. They can be viewed here:

Orchids of North America

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macranthos(Z8B Portland OR)

Give him my complements. They are excellent photos!

Best,
Ross

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plantfreak(z9aKyushuJapan)

That's a special treat! Thank you.

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bigred(z8 Ark.)

Took my breath away. Wonderful job!

PP

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mooonie(z4-Lino Lakes)

I want Lady Slippers in my garden. I have an acre of land, many different kinds of gardens and it's really been a dream to have native orchids.
I have propagated from seed many different kinds of native( to Minnesota ) perennials.
Would you kindly point me to any area where I might start.
I know that proper soil conditions are very important..what else?
They take my breath away with their beauty but if they wouldn't thrive, I would just look at pictures of them.
I'm afraid of what I don't know will kill them once purchased.
Thank you

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kwoods(Cold z7 Long Is)

The site is beautiful.

Two good recent books

Growing Hardy Orchids

Gardener's Guide to Growing Perennial Orchids

Both these books are very good/informative. Fall is the best time to plant so you have a whole year to research and prepare and decide if you want to do it.

Late Aug to mid Sept is a good time to order plants from one of the many reliable, lab propagated only, online sources. Good luck!

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mooonie(z4-Lino Lakes)

Thanks for the information. The Showy Lady Slipper is our state flower. I was a young teenager when we moved from California to here. The first time I saw one was at the U of MN and I was entranced immediately.

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bbehan(z5IN)

There are a few good sources for native orchids, one is Vermont Ladyslipper Co (www.vtladyslipper.com). It is virtually impossible for the average gardener to grow these plants from seeds, since there must be a certain fungus in the soil that helps them geminate and grow. Your best chances are with a company like this one that RESPONSIBLY propagates and grows native orchids. Please beware that some plants offered for sale have been dug from the wild, a practice that is often illegal, jeopadizes their long-term survival in the wild, and provides you with plants that will most likely die in your garden, since they cannot adjust to being uprooted and transplanted. Good luck! Bruce

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orchids99(z6PA)

Hi All
If you are interested there is a Native Orchid Conference this summer in Oregano. It is held at different locations each year. This is the link I got from the Orchid Mall website.
Jim

5th Annual Native Orchid Conference
June 9-12, 2006, Ashland, OR

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ahughes798(z5 IL)

Bruce, I too have read many, many times that native orchids need certain fungi to germinate and grow. However, from looking at the websites of businesses that grow orchids..I know that they germinate and grow their seedlings in flasks, in a sterile agar solution. So, I think it can be done both ways. With difficulty. April

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kwoods(Cold z7 Long Is)

April, you are exactly right. Asymbiotic germination vs. symbiotic germination.

Orchid seeds consist of embryo and a thin seed coat, they lack an endosperm or food source. They need to get their nutrients somewhere else thus a relationship w/ a specialized mycorrhizae found in the soil (symbiotic germination). Or, in the case of asymbiotic germination, that mycorrhizae is replaced by specific nutrients in agar.

Once they can produce enough of their own food they don't NEED the additional food source anymore but some say it helps for optimal long term health.

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ahughes798(z5 IL)

Thanks, Kwoods. I have always wondered about this seeming contradiction. April

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