Heart-Leaf Milkweed (Asclepias cordifolia) seed

mary_littlerockar(8a-7b mid Arkansas)

Based on photos of this milkweed, posted to another thread by Mark (wildflowerman_2000), I purchased seed and would like to try growing this lovely milkweed.

I would love to hear from anyone having experience with Heart-Leaf Milkweed (Asclepias cordifolia) milkweed.

Should the seed be cold stratified and if so, for how long? I've kept the seed in the fridge but don't know how long to hold them before attempting to germinate. Since their native range is west coast and rather dry, I'm curious about the method of germination.

Mary

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butterflymomok(7a NE OK)

Check out Butterfly Encounters for information on how to grow this milkweed. I know he has it for sale. I've tried a couple of times with no success.

Good Luck!

Sandy

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mary_littlerockar(8a-7b mid Arkansas)

Thanks, Sandy. If you didn't have any luck, then it's probably a losing cause. This milkweed has such a lovely bloom, I just had to give it a try. I've lived in California and know how different the humidity can be in our neck of the woods, comparatively speaking. And if these plants naturally grow at higher altitudes, then the daytime temps would be what we'd consider lovely spring or fall days, temp wise. So maybe we're fighting both high temps and humidity here.

I received an email from Joyful Butterflies, the on-line vendor where I purchased my seed (BTW, beautiful big healthy looking seed) and she wrote to say her on-line growing suggestions were to be discarded. She now believes the seed needs more cold stratification than she originally thought. I'm going to hold the seed in the fridge for two months and then try germinating half my count. Will keep back half in case this try is unsuccessful.

Mary

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glenn_risley

Sandy and Mary,

I was successful germinating Asclepias cordifolia last fall, 2014. I cold moist stratified them in moist paper towels in a plastic sandwich bag in the refrigerator for 4 to 5 months. I changed the paper towels and the plastic bag every month. I then put 3 to 4 seeds in each pot in a 25 pot Jiffy Pot planter. I then put them in a greenhouse with 16 hours of light and heat. I had over 85% germination in 2 weeks.

Glenn

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mary_littlerockar(8a-7b mid Arkansas)

Oh, such great news and helpful instructions. Thank you so much for taking the time to share your experience and fantastic results. I think there will be many gardeners who will appreciate this post.

Mary

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