are these natives or escaped old domestic plants?

jacqueline9CA

I took these 2 pics along a road near our cabin in No Cal, about 3500 ft up, near a large creek. This area was way more heavily populated in the mid & late 19th century (gold rush) than it is now.

The first one looks like fox gloves to me, but I would like to know if it is a garden escapee or a native.

I will post a pic of the second one next.

Thanks for your help!

Jackie

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jacqueline9CA

Here is the second one - looks like some kind of dianthus to me, but again I would like to know if it is a native or an escapee. Smells faintly of carnations.

Jackie

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Spicebush

Yes the first one is foxglove and the second one is Sweet William. It is in the dianthus family. both are biennial and keep going by self-sowing. Pretty pics!

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lycopus(z5 NY)

Both are garden escapes

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jacqueline9CA

Thank you both for the IDs and the answer to my question.

It amazes me how old garden plants from the gold rush times have survived in this area - I have found several others, way far away from any current homes. Just a reminder that if you plant plants which like the conditions, they do not need any plant food, spraying, mulching (since the forest mulches itself), pruning or other fussing to thrive. Also, this area only gets rain or snow perhaps 3-4 months of the year - the other months are 100% dry, so no irrigating required either!

Of course there are natives which thrive here also - I have found some pretty wild lilies and roses. But it is the escaped garden plants that fascinate me, being sort of leftover ghosts from when this area was a thriving, busy, well populated place in the mid and late 19th century.

Jackie

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wisconsitom(Zone 4/5)

Nice post Jackie, and a nice reminder that every non-native plant is not somehow a problem. At least, I don't think so!

+oM

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