storing wild ginger rhizomes

Leah45(6a)

Hi all. I'm new to this forum. I've been steadily replacing my grass with native plants, and had planned to put wild ginger (asarum canadense) and virginia bluebells into my shady east-facing front yard. Little did I know that a massive sewage reconstruction process was going to happen there! The rhizomes I ordered arrived, and my tiny front yard keeps getting mauled by refuse, construction vehicles, and boots digging into the wet clay. Needless to say, I can't put the fifty rhizomes I ordered into the ground, and the rest of my property is in full sun. How long can I store them, and how should I go about it? At the moment they are sitting in a plastic colander in the fridge with a dry dish towel over the top, but I'm betting there is a better way. Any help?

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agkistrodon(6/7)

Leah,

I don't know about ginger but I would put the bluebells in the ground in shade/moist area (if you have a little out of the way of the construction area place) and dig them up when you are ready. I bought bluebell rootstock last Spring but a foot of snow arrived ahead of the rootstock. I dug through the snow put the rootstock in and then lost track of it. It came up on a barely covered rock this Spring and I quickly moved it. Not only had it multiplied on the barely covered rock but it flowered after being relocated this spring! Your rootstock is most likely dormant now as bluebells are very early risers in Spring so you really can't hurt them. Good luck!

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wisconsitom(Zone 4/5)

Maybe pot them up and place in shaded spot. I know you said you don't have any additional shade, but could there not be enough room somewhere for these to be kept potted until the construction is over?

+oM

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Leah45(6a)

Thanks, both of you. I have a very small space behind my azaleas that at least meets the light requirements. How closely could I consider planting the rhizomes together and have them come out unscathed? Would it make sense to plant them fairly tightly now, with the intention of transplanting them in the fall? Unfortunately the end of construction is slated for September, and these things always seem to exceed their projected deadlines.

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agkistrodon(6/7)

I would plant them separately but they can be close together....mine were as close together as I could get them as the ground was frozen and I was barely able to make a hole in it. In addition it doesn't actually need to be shaded at all..... come to think of it I buried mine in full sun! They probably prefer dappled shade in the long run but when they're dormant I guess it doesn't matter as much! Moving them any time in fall/winter is probably fine!

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Leah45(6a)

Thanks adidas! For some reason your response didn't show up in my email. I followed your advice, and planted them pretty closely together in the shadiest spot I had. I'll put pictures up if or when I see any signs of life.

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