Cyp showing?

ArborBluffGirl(8)

I planted two Cypripedium acaule last year that I received in a trade and am wondering when new growth will start to show? I planted them near blueberries, bunchberry, hepatica and ferns. Anyone have any experience or suggestions for zone 6 central PA? Thanks Shari

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terrestrial_man(9)

Be patient for another month. If you know of any growing in nearby gardens you may want to check on those. I am
in zone 9 in central California and the one I had last
year sprouted up in late March.
Currently I have a C. kentuckiense that is poking its tip
through the surface of my potting mix. I know that the
C. reginae has a bud but it has not yet made its entry into
the world of light. I have my fingers crossed as its roots
were not all that developed.

Do you have a pH soil test kit? You should test your soil
near where you planted the cyps. They really need a very
acid soil (or as far as I am concerned a neutral soil to acidic soil but
with acidified watering: 2 ounces apple cider vinegar to
gallon of steam distilled water).

You should try an easier cyp to grow. I left some links to
internet sites to buy them from under Woodlands-transplanting lady slippers.

Cheers.

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macranthos(Z8B Portland OR)

Hi Shari,
Here in Z8, all my Cyps are up. They always start showing when the soil temp gets about 45-50F or so. I give the pots sun when the temps are permanently above freezing to get them up a little earlier :-)

Cyp acaule does need a pH around 3-5 to survive for long. Invest in a meter.

Best,
Ross

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kwoods(Cold z7 Long Is)

Zone 7 LI cyp report ;o) My acaule is just below the soil surface yet. Lots of parviflorum up, candidum first pip just yesterday, reginae not yet, kentuckiense not yet, some asians up too. All are in the ground (not pots). Don't give up for another couple weeks Shari.

Glad to see your post Ross.

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ArborBluffGirl(8)

Thanks for the responses. The ph of the soil is 4.5 and is fairly loamy. I will keep an eye out for growth.

One other question, my county in PA is experiencing a drought and while we've had a two good soakings, we are still behind waterwise, so I am wondering if I should water the orchids in particular since they are still reasonably new?

If I do water, should I use the orchid food that I use on my other orchids or perhaps use the vinegar, water combo that terrestrial man suggested?

Thanks ~ Shari

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ladyslppr(z6 PA)

I wouldn't worry about watering them, at least not yet. C. acaule is very drought tolerant, and the ground isn't very dry right now.

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terrestrial_man(9)

Hello Nankeen,
You have acaule in a pot?
What kind of mix do you use?

I have to make an acidic type mix and have had my ups and
downs (mostly downs!) doing so. Thought I stumbled upon it a couple of years ago and dug up some of the debris from years of monterey pine needles that built up in my backyard.
The plant did good but the mix broke down and the roots rotted away before I realized what happened. Now I am not being ginger anymore. This is not a china closet!!!
Nonetheless I feel like I am trying to bull myself into having to take a bizarre perspective on growing this orchid. Dammn the mix and use marbles instead! Its all in the water right????

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macranthos(Z8B Portland OR)

I've only tried acaule once, and failed miserably at it. That was a while ago and I know of several people who have them growing successfully. I agree competely with the mix being perfectly draining: Marbles would do it :-) I like pumice. I suppose that one could maintain a good pH using a neutral potting mix but highly acid (pH 3-4) water as long as you measured the mix's pH very often, though I haven't tried it... soon, I will have to I guess since I have them growing in flask...

Best,
Ross

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terrestrial_man(9)

FABULATASTIC ROSS!!!!

That is way cool! Hope you keep a photo journal on its
progress!

As far as acaule is concerned I think if the mix is free draining that watering every day with the acidified distilled would do the trick. Of course I am using a mixed
wood based media and I think that I may try and bag up some and get it wet so that it rots in the bag and see if that might work if it retains its free draining qualities or even if its pH works out to 4.5 or thereabouts. Of course there is always the possibility of growing it in a live sphagnum bog-it is just that I cannot fit my bog in a bucket into my refrigerator during winter!!!!!! Maybe I should invest in an ice machine!!!

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kwoods(Cold z7 Long Is)

Acaule is now up on Long Island Z7. Probably have blossoms first/second week of May?

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ArborBluffGirl(8)

There is a lone leaf coming up where I planted the acuale last year. It is about 2 inches or so long. I don't expect the plant to bloom this year so I will keep an eye out for it and keep my fingers crossed.

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kwoods(Cold z7 Long Is)

Should be two leaves which come up in a cone then separate.

Congrats!

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ArborBluffGirl(8)

I stand corrected. I have a chicken wire enclosure around each area where I planted a cyp. There are things growing just inside the wire which is what I thought might be a cyp. However, upon further inspection, there is a nub about half an inch tall just starting to break ground. Should I pull anything growing around the cyps or let them go?

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kwoods(Cold z7 Long Is)

I wouldn't disturb the roots. If you can gently pull stuff without disturbing the soil much I'd go for it, otherwise leave 'em or just cut the offenders off at soil level. My Platanthera blephariglottis increased a lot this year and I noticed some coming up in close proximity to another plant. Instead of uprooting the plant I sacrificed it by cutting it off at the crown.

The other thing I sometimes do is clear any moist, muddy or "bad" soil from the base of the pips once they've broken the soil surface. I've had emerging cyps rot from moist soil being on the green part of the emerging cone. Probably best to just leave 'em alone and enjoy! Sounds like you did good.

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