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jane__ny

Tips and tricks getting through a hurricane!

jane__ny
2 months ago

Live in Florida and looks like we are getting hit with a hurricane in the next few days. Lived through Irma 6 yrs ago and it was a nightmare. Took 10 days to get power back, we finally checked into a hotel nearby to have AC, lights and at least a microwave and small refrigerator. Hoping this one won't be as bad.


I'm thinking about our cell phone and how to charge them without power? Was wondering if there are small solar battery chargers? Also, solar chargers to plug a lamp in.


I'm dreading this. Tomorrow will be running to the supermarket to stock up on water, etc. but how to cook? I don't have a gas grill and thinking of getting a small one so we could cook.


Anyway, I'm just tired of having to deal with this again.


Jane

Comments (113)

  • lily316
    2 months ago

    Stay safe Floridians. It sounds very scary. Also, a PA person and will gladly take snow storms over hurricanes any day of the week.

  • woodnymph2_gw
    2 months ago

    I am in Charleston, SC and Ian is headed our way Friday morning. I've lived through NW PA ice storms and major hurricane hits in coastal VA. I am still dealing with PTSD after surviving a major hit in VA some years ago. At that time, we lost power for over 2 weeks and with all the downed trees, our neighborhood looked like a war zone. The worst ones are when the wind switches directions in mid storm so you can get socked on both sides. Everyone I talk to who lived in downtown Charleston has stories about Hugo, in 1989.

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  • arcy_gw
    2 months ago

    And now the clean up begins. I think most people who know anything will choose a blizzard over a hurricane--so not the same thing!! Tornado would be closer. No power, flooded, life washed away....I just pray everyone did as asked and left. Just like in a blizzard it's those that do not listen to authorities and evacuate pay the biggest price.

  • vgkg Z-7 Va
    2 months ago

    Good Luck Woodnymph, I know it's low country down your way so hope a weakened Ian doesn't send a major Tidal surge into Charleston. The inland rain will be brutle enough down there.

  • Elmer J Fudd
    2 months ago

    "I think most people who know anything will choose a blizzard over a hurricane"


    This sounds like you're complimenting yourself for your own choice. I can do that too. Peanut gallery people understand I'm saying this for the message, not for the veracity.


    Smart people don't want to risk their lives, property, or be threatened with serious inconvenience from violent weather events and so choose to live where there are neither blizzards nor hurricanes.

  • lisaam
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    The entire US population cannot simply choose places without hurricanes and blizzards, whether smart or smart alecky. Those other locations are likely to come with fires and tornadoes and earth quakes and droughts. Plus it would be very crowded.

  • morz8 - Washington Coast
    2 months ago

    Has anyone heard how Jane is doing?

  • lisaam
    2 months ago

    My mother-in-law who also lives in Sarasota has been without electricity for a bit more than 24 hours and says it looks like the end of the world (my translation lots of downed trees on the golf course) but is otherwise well. Hope that Jane is also.

  • Elmer J Fudd
    2 months ago

    These storms are indeed frightening. The devastation caused by the forces of wind and water are beyond belief. It will take time for normalcy to be restored.

  • jane__ny
    Original Author
    2 months ago

    I’m fine! Exhausted, but happy it’s over. Have a lot of tree damage, fence blew out, orchids blown all over, but house did fine. No internet , cable, phones out.
    My son found a bar open with internet so I’m sitting with a glass of Pinot answering all my texts and emails from family and friends.
    Wishing everyone who had to endure this storm, good wishes.

    Life is good!

    Jane

  • olychick
    2 months ago

    I know everyone has their sources for news - I don't have tv so try to rely on Hulu and youtube and twitter, but it's hard to time things so I see a whole program unless I remember to record something. But I saw this and it was so dramatic about what actually happened during the storm surge in Ft Myers Beach, I thought others might appreciate seeing it. I had no idea what this was like. Storm surge

  • summersrhythm_z6a
    2 months ago

    Jane, don't drink too much and stay too late. Watch out for alligators in flooded streets.

  • bpath
    2 months ago

    Alligators in the streets??? Hadn’t thought of THAT!

  • nickel_kg
    2 months ago

    Olychick, that storm surge video was terrifying!

    Jane and others, I'm glad the worst is over for you. Fingers crossed for those in the rest of Ian's path.

    On Tuesday we were on the highway (in Virginia) and saw several huge generators labelled "FEMA" heading south. We used to live closer to 95 (the major north/south route) and would see convoys of utility trucks heading toward whatever storm was going on. Made me so grateful that there are skilled people working to restore our systems despite having to travel hundreds of miles, work tirelessly, etc.

  • Olychick
    2 months ago

    Holy cow, sharks AND alligators? Unfortunately, I suppose neither will drown. That's just too much in addition to all the tragedy and destruction.

  • Rose Pekelnicky
    2 months ago

    Jane, I'm glad to see you are safe

  • Elmer J Fudd
    2 months ago

    Alligators are a normal thing in Florida, not just after storms. For a few years in my career I had to spend a week or two each year at a conference facility that was somewhere between Tampa and Orlando. I forget the name of it. The physical layout was a scattering of small condo buildings on a site with a golf course that had many water hazards. On arrival, guests were warned that there were a fair number of alligators who inhabited the water traps (some of the bodies of water were large) and that care should be taken when jogging the paths or walking between one's condo room and the central facilities where the meeting rooms were. A safe interval was recommended, I think it was 10 yards.

    On each trip morning and evening, I saw at least one. No thanks.

  • lat62
    2 months ago

    I want Florida to be fixed up and back to normal ASAP! Just like NOLA, lower manhattan, and anywhere that needs to be rebuilt with imaginative engineering to take us to the future. Take care, be safe!

  • bpath
    2 months ago



  • Kathsgrdn
    2 months ago

    Yes, Great Lakes, somewhat better than Florida, however, it's also the land of ice cold lakes that never turn up their dead. (Shiver) Like Tahoe and Pyramid back home in NV. Too deep and cold with who-knows-what lurking in their depths. lol

  • lily316
    2 months ago

    That storm surge video was scary to watch. I am so surprised at the resiliency of palm trees. They bend in way over 100 mph winds but rarely break. The poor people whose house that was.

  • Annie Deighnaugh
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    The storm surge video was stunning...and so clear when the storm had gone by and you see the winds reverse as the palms blow in the other direction. And the oddity of the house being gone and yet the stairs remain.

    It's going to be a long time to rebuild...and Ian is still causing trouble now for the Carolinas. The amount of power in a hurricane is absolutely stunning when you consider how heavy water is to lift and carry, how much water they move over how many thousands of miles and then all the energy in the winds too. Truly awesome storms.

    I live in New England and have been through hurricanes and blizzards and tornadoes...every kind of weather you can have. We've even had earthquakes. And my take is none of it is fun, all of it is dangerous and it doesn't matter what kind of bad weather it is if it puts your life and your property at risk. I don't know of anywhere anyone can live that doesn't face risks.

  • chisue
    2 months ago

    From what I've seen on TV and reading the newspaper, Ian's hit on Florida wasn't quite as awful as I'd feared. But now...the Carolinas? Again?


    DH and I have spent our 80+ years hugging the south western shore of Lake Michigan. Weather events are extremely rare north of the bottom tip of the lake. (Worst storms sometimes whip along south of that.) We did experience hurricane watches sometimes on Maui, but the only water damage to our condo there came from the upstairs neighbor's ice maker.

  • morz8 - Washington Coast
    2 months ago

    Damage to some of those Florida communities looked pretty awful to me. I turned away from the news last night.

    My niece is in Raleigh-Durham. Schools are closed in her district today in preparation for potential flooding. She is a sheriff, her husband a paramedic on disability - meaning they have access to earliest information and I don't worry about her personal safety from weather events. Many events there have been cancelled but Duke still is planning on their homecoming and football game tomorrow.

  • Elmer J Fudd
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    “. I don't know of anywhere anyone can live that doesn't face risks.”

    Nowhere is free of having risks from natural phenomena but the frequency of what can happen varies greatly from place to place. Some regions are much more prone to frequent problems than others, where and what are pretty well known.

  • Sherry
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    Elmer, get off this post. You have NO input and do not know what you are talking about. You are just being a TROLL.

    ETA: If you have something to say on a post about wildfires or earthquakes, OK.

  • petalique
    2 months ago

    Sherry, please stop being so rude. You behaved similarly on another thread. Cut it out. And stop name calling.

  • petalique
    2 months ago

    JaneNY, thanks for checking in. Has anyone heard from carolb?


    I agree, that storm video and many others are stunning.


    I have always been interested in weather and always pay attention to it.


    Sure, these are likely risks (weather, culture, viscious critters, natural phenomenon) just about everywhere. Some places are definitely plagued by more and in some locations you can get ALL. Sometimes we have some dregree of choice in where we live; sometimes not. Sometimes we can pick our presumed risks.


    I have a pile of things I don’t like about where I’m living and wish I could change, but in some ways, it’s not all that bad.


    On my personal list, I wanted to avoid as much as possible:


    Earthquakes, tornadoes, big hurricanes, big fires, big droughts, alligators, toxic snakes, high crime, hot muggy weather, tigers, lions, wars, famine, sand storms, congestion, crowds, 3 hour traffic lines, pestilance and disease, nasty insects, worm loads (like filaria).




  • petalique
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    This meteorology student, Evan Fisher, has created some incredible maps projecting what predicted flood waters and storm surges would look like in vulnerable areas.

    Some of the Fort Myers area I spotted on other forums or Twitter. Some news coverage picked up on them. And, mors8, he has one for Charleston, NC.

    https://www.trendsmap.com/topic/%40efisherwx

    @EFISHERWX



  • Sherry
    2 months ago

    petalique, NO. I am not rude. The troll is rude. He does not have anything to do with a hurricane, EVER!

  • jrb451
    2 months ago

    Several years ago we stayed in the cottage circled in red at the Waterside Inn on Sanibel Island.

    That same cottage today after Ian.


  • chisue
    2 months ago

    TV coverage today shows MUCH more damage than I'd seen yesterday, along with footage of rescue workers going door to door at Fort Myers Beach. Is that an island??? Won't many of these properties be IN the ocean soon anyway, due to climate change? Isn't Miami Beach already pumping like mad to stay dry?


    Our climate change near Chicago has been warmer winters -- and, I'm sure, less welcome things.


  • aok27502
    2 months ago

    @morz8 - Washington Coast - we are in the general RDU area. So far today it's been raining, sometimes hard. The trees are blowing pretty good at times. But the local news site isn't reporting any flooding, outages, lines down. So far just a gusty rain event. And tomorrow is supposed to be partly cloudy and in the 70s. The day after a hurricane is always beautiful.

  • petalique
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    Chisue, I know! It is amazing, astonishing and it makes me sad and mad.

    We should not build homes on barrier islands. Definitely not sustainable (as many places are not.

    I am a news, info, and weather junky (who needs a housekeeper ASAP).. I am rivetted (spell for me!) by this. I have a million questions. The damage is so widespread. The death toll will be great. The pain and hurt immeasurable.

    Naive me, having only visited a few areas of Florida, but a lover of sailing, I supposed that people who lived in these up close coastal areas of Florida or the Gulf coast were always people of means. Not True. Many working class folks. Their home might have been ALL they have or had. Part of me would JUMP at the ”chance” to live so close to the ocean. Until I sobered up.

    I am a news/info junky, so have seen so much of the destruction, the displaced people, the ”helpers” (”Look for the helpers.”) and so many remarkable people and situations.

    Hey, chisue, I feel with you. We can donate, we can vote and try to effect wise policy.

    Meanwhile, you keep on trucking and keep up the tradition — color that river GREEN next St. Pat’s Day. {{{{Chicago}}}}

  • petalique
    2 months ago

    Jrb, thanks for sharing. It has to break your heart and I’m sure you feel for those folks. It is such a monumental loss that this hurricane ha created.

  • carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    I'm here - we're safe and sound, back at home after mandatory evacuation. Our area dodged the bullet, but there's still lots of downed limbs and debris from the winds. Many people lost power, but our street did not, nether did my cousin's, who lives in a non-evac area.

    We are very, very fortunate.

    This image of Ft Myers from NPR.org really got to me:



    Hubby's late mom used to live in Ft. Myers - had 2 houses - one was an historic wood frame called Briar Patch.

    FWIW, I have seen commentary about how our state & local lawmakers need to be held to account for facilitating so much continued development in such vulnerable areas. Also the hollowing out of the home insurance market here has been in the news for some time now. Many people lost their home insurance over the past year or so. These things do not occur for no reason.

    That's all I'll say about that.

  • petalique
    last month
    last modified: last month

    carolb, thanks for reporting in and i’m so glad to hear that you are safe.

    That NPR photo and oters make me want to cry and scream. People should not be encouraged, robbed and left with nothing. A promoter of the insurance industry was on a TV news program last night, claiming that there were ample and flush funds to address losses and that the ins industry was (something akin to) the lifeblood of our blah blah blah. The interviewer/host, Ashleigh Banfield, countered that many reports argue otherwise. She asked if the cost would not be spread and absorbed by other policy holder across the entire US. Of course. What a racket.

    There are so many images an stories of people (elderly, infirm) stuck and trapped in this horrible situation. The devastation is monumental.

  • woodnymph2_gw
    last month

    Still here in downtown Charleston. Ian hit us about 2 p.m. but the strong winds and heavy rains lasted most of yesterday and today. Now we have flooded streets, some structural damage, huge old trees down and many without power. I feel lucky as I did not lose power. Now Ian has moved up in the direction of Wilmington NC and will hit parts of coastal VA,also, but much weakened. It is so frightening to see the photos of Florida damage. The strange thing this time was instead of hot and humid weather, it turned cooler than normal this far South as the hurricane progressed. Some winds here were clocked at 92 mph.

  • petalique
    last month

    Glad to hear you’re safe woodnymph.


    Good that it is cool. Those without electricity will not be sweltering.Such a beautiful area and sad for those mature trees.

  • carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b
    last month

    Oh wow - we are a fortunate bunch, aren't we?

    It got a lot cooler here as well. I do seem to recall reading some NWS forecast discussion about a mass of drier air expected post Ian...?

  • vgkg Z-7 Va
    last month

    Whew! So glad to hear that both of you came out in rather pretty good shape and with power - A Huge Plus! Ian has a 1-2 punch, he sliced thru Fla like it was a sandwich and then regained enough strength to Smack SC as a Cat 1. A horrendous disaster to endure for too many. Up here in Va we feel lucky to just get some much needed rain. As Ian hits the Blue Ridge the models show it backing up there's no telling how much rain we'll get before he departs out sea by Monday? I ain't much of a religious guy but 3 words that easily come from my mouth right now are God Help Florida.

  • Cherryfizz
    last month

    So much damage. I was talking to my cousin tonight. He lost his condo in Fort Myers and his home in Bonita Springs was damaged by the storm surge. He and his wife live in another state but they spend much of their time at their Florida home. They were scheduled to be there 2 days after the hurricane hit but now he is driving down to look at the damage to his home. Glad to hear our Florida Kters are safe.

  • summersrhythm_z6a
    last month

    For the working class folks who can’t go back to work due to property damages, and don’t have the opportunities of WFH , their income just went with Ian. What should they do? They’d have to look for new jobs in other areas, start over again. It looks like a long journey to recovery for many companies in the path of Ian. I am wondering how many people would stay jobless waiting for their companies to reopen the doors. Hope for a speedy recovery.

  • Olychick
    last month

    Yes, just think of all the retail and service workers, restaurant workers, home health aides, housecleaners, gardeners, etc. who barely make a living wage when they work full time, or two or three jobs. There is not going to be work for them, or affordable housing and likely they have little or no savings or insurance. It's really heartbreaking.

  • carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b
    last month

    And of course, most low wage workers are renters, not homeowners...

  • sushipup2
    last month

    A neighbor's sister and BIL, 67 and 79, moved to Ft Myers about 4 years ago, from New Jersey. They evacuated, and then went back to check. Their home is intact but John had a heart attack and went to the ICU in a hospital with only generator power. Last I heard yesterday is that they are trying to get him evacuated, possibly to a hospital in Orlando.

    They have no family in FL. His daughter is in Texas and trying to get there to help.

    Why do people of a certain age move away from their families and other support systems? I know it seemed like a good idea at the time.

  • Elmer J Fudd
    last month

    "Why do people of a certain age move away from their families and other support systems?"


    At the risk of stating the obvious and with no intent to offend, the answer for most is - to escape cold or rainy winters. I think it's fair to say that the predominant path runs north to south. I think you've previously mentioned your retirement move from Central California to the Mid-Atlantic region because your son and his family are there. I believe moves in that direction are less common than the mostly southerly travel of stereotypical "snowbirds" who make permanent moves.

    I share your view to an extent. Many people's kids don't always return "home" if they go away for college and can wind up spending their adult years elsewhere. This is true for us with respect to all of our kids but the other component of a "support system" for many is proximity to friends. The paths snowbirds take often leads them to where they no one at all, neither family nor friends. THAT to me makes no sense at all.

    I'm not sure what forum participant Jim has for family but he's mentioned recently having moved back to Illinois, reversing a retirement move to Florida he made some years ago. I think he said a big reason was that they found they didn't like the weather in Florida.

  • Kathsgrdn
    last month

    I feel bad for all those people who didn't have the means to leave before the hurricane.


  • carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Agreed Kath, and you've reminded me that there are always going to be some people who are just not aware of what's going on. Just today I saw that someone on our local nextdoor had posted on Wednesday about being surprised that their Orlando hotel had closed their pool due to the hurricane.

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