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always1stepbehind

Cutting back on sugar. Low sugar yogurts....

I am trying to cut down on my sugar intake...I picked up a few low sugar greek yogurts and I just can't deal with the after-taste. NO thank you. I like the regular chobani cherry, fruit on the bottom, but I only eat the yogurt part, not the fruity part on the bottom. Maybe I'll stick with that since I dont eat the fruity part, where I have to assume a lot of the sugar is.

Comments (63)

  • Lindsey_CA
    last month

    For years I wouldn't eat yogurt because I don't like the "tanginess" of yogurt. Then, I would eat Yoplait yogurt because it's sweeter. But several years ago we cut out most dairy products. We get the French butter from Trader Joe's, and the only "milk" I drink is Califa Coconut Almond Milk Blend and So Delicious Coconut Milk. The yogurt I eat is Oui by Yoplait, Dairy Free Coconut Milk Yogurt.

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  • sephia_wa
    last month

    I googled "low sugar yogurt" and found this article.


    15 Best Low-Sugar Yogurt, Approved by Dieticians, March 4, 2021

  • Elmer J Fudd
    last month

    Plain yogurt shouldn't have anything in it other than milk and cultures. Plain, no sugar. With fruit added, just what's in the raw fruit.

  • Debby
    last month

    I hate Greek Yogurt and don't get the hype about it. If you want yogurt with less sugar, buy vanilla yogurt but look for the fuller fat type. I buy Iogo Yogurt, it's delicious. I can't eat plain yogurt of any brand, Yuck.

  • bpath
    last month

    DH likes the Siggi’s, and he always has plain yogurt. He’s getting quite funny about sugar without paying attention to where sugar lurks naturally. for example, he was complaining about the sugars in milk and pure juice, and was skeptical of me telling him it’s not ADDED sugar.

  • Elmer J Fudd
    last month
    last modified: last month

    "I hate Greek Yogurt and don't get the hype about it."

    I don't think there's any hype about it, to me it's a flavor and a consistency, a product of the cultures and processes used.

    You like wine? For reds, some people don't select different kinds depending on the food they're eating and just go with one varietal. Zinfandel, or pinot noir, or beaujolais? All have different flavors, from different grapes and different processes.

    Plain yogurt? There Bulgairan yogurt. Icelandic. Greek. Or, unspecified, to me which is like a wine bottle labled as "red wine". Enjoy what you prefer but understand what accounts for the differences.

  • raee_gw zone 5b-6a Ohio
    last month

    We also have a local dairy that makes wonderful plain yogurt. No added stabilizers and such. I never knew that yogurt could taste so good, having only had the major store brands before!

  • carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b
    last month
    last modified: last month

    I stick to plain full fat yoghurts. Even vanilla has a lot of sugar. It is possible to adjust your taste preferences if you don't give up. Sugary yoghurt doesn't even appeal to me now. I buy Aldi's plain whole milk organic plain yoghurt. It's not as tangy as other organic brands - very creamy.

    Another way to cut back might be to have plain yoghurt drizzled with just a spoonful of honey or maple syrup. Adding vanilla can intensify sweetness without adding sugar.

    Recently was reading that eating more fresh fruit, esp. apples, can really help curb sugar cravings. I prefer Pink Lady apples and eat at least one almost every day. A serving of whole milk plain Greek yoghurt + 2-3 servings fresh fruit makes a good breakfast.

    always1stepbehind thanked carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b
  • stacey_mb
    last month

    I used to eat 5% fat Greek yogurt which I love. I also follow Weight Watchers and now eat yogurt with 0% fat and sugar, since it's 0 points. So I've learned to be creative and enjoy it in several different ways. I make a vegetable dip by combining some yogurt, a sprinkle of Spicy Montreal Steak Spice, salt and a small dab of mustard. I thin it out with water if required.

  • Lars
    last month

    Vanilla yogurt is the worst. I bought some by mistake and could not eat it and threw it out. When I buy yogurt, I buy plain yogurt, but I do not generally buy the fat free version. When I worked in an office, I would have yogurt and granola for breakfast at my desk, but now I have Pure Protein shakes instead, as recommended by my dietician.

  • always1stepbehind
    Original Author
    last month

    I'm not about vanilla yogurt either...but NOOSA vanilla bean. OOOOH MMMM GGGGEEEE!!

  • maifleur03
    last month

    I stick to the high fat yogurts with real sweetening along with trying to avoid those with things like gelatin or seaweed although I know those are there to stabilize what would be a runny yogurt. After I had my first DEXA my doctor at that time told me to always have something fatty when I took my calcium or the body will not utilize the calcium to the maximum extent. Must have worked because my bones have become stronger although my right hip still shows osteopenia while my left is in the middle of the readings.

  • carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b
    last month
    last modified: last month

    FWIW, more and more research has been revealing that full fat dairy is actually better for us, and actually can help with weight control.

  • Zalco/bring back Sophie!
    last month

    I am on team Full Fat as well- more satisfying taste and feel equals eating less. Plus no nonsense with fillers and sugars trying to make up for the lack of fat in the food.

  • Annie Deighnaugh
    last month

    I hate Greek Yogurt and don't get the hype about it.

    The hype about it relates to it's lower carbs, higher protein content then something like a traditional dannon yogurt. Chiobani 6g carbs, 14g protein; Dannon 13g carbs, 7g protein.



    Chiobani



    Dannon



  • SeattleMCM
    last month
    last modified: last month

    most packaged foods contain waaaaaay more added sugar than necessary, including things that don't even taste very sweet (like marinara sauce). plus many "low sugar" yogurts add fake sweeteners. if you want to cut sugar, you need to become a good label reader and start making more things from scratch.

    as for yogurt, buy it plain and add what you want. in our case, it's fruit, walnuts, and (real) maple syrup. also, look for a higher fat content, it will taste way better with less sugar. (personally I think fat is fine in moderation.)

    Try other brands too. I used to think Chobani was the best, but now it kind of tastes like garbage once I switched to Zoi.

  • Elmer J Fudd
    last month
    last modified: last month

    "I hate Greek Yogurt and don't get the hype about it.

    The hype about it relates to it's lower carbs, higher protein content then something like a traditional dannon yogurt."

    I think you're mistaken. I believe the nutritional profiles of plain yogurt depends much more on what kind of milk is used - non fat, low fat, or whole milk - than on which cultures are used to produce the particular style. The cultures add no nutrients on their own, as I understand it.

    Plain yogurt needs to stand on its own two feet. Yogurt for flavored types, no matter if high or low calories, high or low fat content, etc., are more generic - like "red wine".

  • Alisande
    last month

    Whole milk yogurt is absolutely delicious, I agree. But for people (like me) who can't handle saturated fat, it's not good at all.

  • Annie Deighnaugh
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Elmer, please look at the data I posted above. There is a significant difference in the carb/protein balance in nonfat greek yogurt vs. nonfat dannon-type yogurt and that is part of the "hype" around it as there has been a shift away from high to low carb diets. As you will see, both of those yogurt nutrition panels posted are nonfat.

  • amylou321
    last month



    Bought this today. I have not tried it yet, so no review on the taste. I must admit, I did not check the label before I bought it. I was in a hurry. 200 calories! Wow. Also, this is black cherry yogurt, yet no black cherries in the ingredients. I may not even eat it. But it is low carb and low sugar.

  • Elmer J Fudd
    last month

    "Elmer, please look at the data I posted above. There is a significant difference in the carb/protein balance in nonfat greek yogurt vs. nonfat dannon-type yogurt"


    I did. You missed when I said that the nutrition content comes from the milk and not the cultures. From one company to another, you can expect different milk sources and also different measurement calibration are involved. And, likely, different manufacturing processes.


    I looked at the two different non-fat yogurts produced by my regional favorite (one Greek style and one not) and both are identical for the major nutrient supplied, calcium. Which again, comes from the milk. As one would expect because although they're two DIFFERENT products styles (one Greek style, one not) they're made with the same milk, Same nutrient content. No surprise.

  • Annie Deighnaugh
    last month

    Elmer, the discussion is about macronutrients, protein vs carb content in various yogurts, not a single micronutrient like calcium. Regardless, the labels I posted show a different % of calcium as well.


    In any case:

    the nutrition content comes from the milk and not the cultures.


    Well, duh, considering that other than milk, the contents are bacteria which typically don't add much in the way of calories.


    Then you gloss over the essential point: "likely, different manufacturing processes"


    Greek yogurt is a different product from regular yogurt and it has to do with the way it is strained which takes out more of the whey yielding a higher protein content, and a thicker texture and a sharper taste.


    It would be like comparing skim milk to whole milk, saying they both come from cow's milk, provide the same calcium, but then ignore the fact that one has a completely different fat and calorie content due to different manufacturing processes which yield a different product.

  • Elmer J Fudd
    last month
    last modified: last month

    The item supplying the highest percentage of the daily recommended intake in your labels above is calcium. It's many multiples of anything else disclosed. That to you is a a "micronutrient"?

    Carbohydrates in yogurt are provided by lactose, aka sugar. You can skew your descriptions to suit how you want to look at it, it doesn't change what's there.

    "Greek yogurt is a different product from regular yogurt and it has to do with the way it is strained which takes out more of the whey yielding a higher protein content, and a thicker texture and a sharper taste."

    As I said before, for the nonfat versions of Greek versus not Greek products of my favorite producer, the nutrient numbers for the two are not materially different. You're comparing different brands and apparently imagining a story to to try to explain why they're not the same. I think the reasons are other than what you think.

    It's fine, we can all choose what we like.

  • Annie Deighnaugh
    last month
    last modified: last month

    The item supplying the highest percentage of the daily recommended intake in your labels above is calcium. It's many multiples of anything else disclosed. That to you is a a [sic] "micronutrient"?



    Souce: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/micronutrient

  • Annie Deighnaugh
    last month

    I can't comment on whatever brand you are looking at as obviously I don't have that data. If you would care to post the actual nutrition labels, then we can take a look.


    But it is not "brand" that is the significant factor when looking at regular vs. greek yogurt as they are different products. For example, Dannon's nonfat greek yogurt has more than twice the protein of their regular nonfat yogurt.


    From Dannon:

    Light + Fit Original Nonfat Yogurt has 70 calories, 0g fat, 13g carbohydrates, 8-9g sugar, 5g protein and 15%DV calcium per 5.3oz. serving. Light + Fit Greek Nonfat Yogurt has 80 calories, 0g fat, 8-9g carbohydrates, 6-7g sugar, 12g protein and 15%DV calcium per 5.3oz.


    Now other brands may use different processes and get their protein content even higher and carb content even lower, but it is the nature of the product itself, just as with skim vs whole milk, that is the primary difference.


    "Greek yogurt is more strained than regular yogurt, making it thicker and creamier," says dietitian Rachel Fine, MS, RD, CSSD, CDN, and owner of To The Pointe Nutrition. Because manufacturers remove more of the whey, which is the liquid component of milk, you're left with a product that is denser in texture.

    This makes Greek yogurt different from traditional yogurt in some notable ways.

    • Greek yogurt has more protein. "Because of it's denser concentration, Greek yogurt generally has up to double the amount of protein when compared to regular yogurt. This makes it a bit more 'nutritionally-dense' per ounce serving, which means it will help to keep you fuller, longer," says Fine.
    • It's lower in sugar. "Additionally, straining off the whey means there will be fewer carbs (and thus, sugar) in Greek yogurt," says Fine.
    • It's also lower in lactose. Lactose is a type of sugar, so because Greek yogurt has less sugar, it also has less lactose than traditional yogurt. "Lactose-sensitive individuals may tolerate it even better than traditional yogurt," says dietitian Jenna Appel, MS, RD, LDN, CPT, and Owner of Appel Nutrition. Although, if you're lactose intolerant, you may want to opt for a lactose-free yogurt.

    Source: https://www.eatthis.com/greek-yogurt/

  • Elmer J Fudd
    last month

    Passages like these found through internet searches are anecdotal and not personal insights. Anything can be found. You've decided how you think it is (as has been done before) and that's fine. Have a good day.

  • nicole___
    last month

    Elmer....I personally would LOVE to try the yogurt you have access to locally. I'll make an effort next time I'm in your neighborhood to find it. ☺ When I visit Australia, I love the honey yogurt with the kangaroo on the container.....only available locally. ♥ Great Value, Walmart sells it.....is my current go-to plain Greek yogurt. note: I can no longer find Sigi's plain yogurt locally.


    A lot of diets are now eliminating milk products as a way to lose weight. As a runner....we still eat sugar.

  • Elmer J Fudd
    last month

    I think you'd like it, nicole. Straus has quite a following. I'd call them a boutique producer, a family run business. Their products are most easily found in their immediate region (Marin and Sonoma Counties) and selectively elsewhere. At Whole Foods including in SoCal but sometimes at other stores too.

  • Annie Deighnaugh
    last month

    You've decided how you think it is ...


    To quote Henry Kissinger, "It has the added advantage of being true."

  • maifleur03
    last month

    Breaking it to you gently but a quick search showed that all the Sprouts in this area along with Whole Foods carry it. I thought I had seen it at Sprouts the last time you mentioned that it was sold locally but hesitated mentioning. Others may find it in their area if they type in their zip code using "Find our products" in the upper right of this page.


    Link: Organic Dairy Products | Straus Family Creamery

  • nicole___
    last month

    maifleur.....Thanks! Five stores near me carry it....just not the ones I usually shop.....so I hadn't seen it. ♥ I'll mosey on over, in my grocery travels next week.

  • maifleur03
    last month

    Nicole do not be surprised if it does not meet with the expectations that Elmer gives it. One of the things about the dairy industry is that it is cheaper to hire a local processor using local products for many things with just a label slapped on than to send the product via truck, train, or plane as processed foodstuffs. Probably several on here had the experience of one of their favorite foods just did not taste the same when traveling in another location.

  • Annie Deighnaugh
    last month

    Straus European style nonfat yogurt, from their website:




    Straus Greek style nonfat yogurt, same source:



  • Elmer J Fudd
    last month
    last modified: last month

    I said this earlier, one of the comments you may have chosen to ignore. I said essentially the same nutrients in the two styles. Slightly more fat, calories and cholesterol in the Greek version, same carbs. Miniscule differences, call them the same. Note that the serving size is larger than the others you cut and pasted.

  • Zalco/bring back Sophie!
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Nicole, Straus's yougut is in fact TDF, but just in case you are up for something a little naughtier, their ice cream is amazing too. Raspberry is my favorite, and I make my own raspberry ice cream, this is almost as good, which is to say heavenly.

  • Annie Deighnaugh
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Note that in the two posted, there is no difference in fat but nearly double the protein in the greek style.

  • nicole___
    last month

    It sounds delicious....we each eat one yogurt a day. I'll report back.....☺ The Choc-chip cookie dough ice cream in my freezer should be gone by next week. Raspberry....yum!

  • Elmer J Fudd
    last month
    last modified: last month

    About the same protein as two eggs, cereal or other food with a cup of milk, a smaller portion of cottage cheese, or a continental breakfast that includes cheese and cold cuts. If you come up short of 1/3 of the RDA, you still have the rest of the day to catch up, also tomorrow. Enjoy your breakfast.


    I'm glad I was able to shine a light on Straus and its great products. The website says it was the first creamery in the US to be certified as Organic, not a small accomplishment. The rest of the conversation hasn't been as useful.

  • Elmer J Fudd
    last month
    last modified: last month

    "Nicole do not be surprised if it does not meet with the expectations that Elmer gives it. One of the things about the dairy industry is that it is cheaper to hire a local processor using local products for many things with just a label slapped on than to send the product via truck, train, or plane as processed foodstuffs. Probably several on here had the experience of one of their favorite foods just did not taste the same when traveling in another location."

    I'm not sure why the negativism. Thanks to zalco for adding her affirmation of what I said about the Straus products we get locally. The question about wider distribution wasn't addressed on the website. So I asked them directly. I got a rapid email response that said in part::

    "there are a few retailers that service the Rocky Mountain region who pick up our product in California and truck it to a warehouse in Colorado. Additionally, Sprouts Farmers Market is a national grocery chain and all stores carry most of the same product. They carry our products with longer shelf life (yogurt with 60 days, and ice cream with 6 months) and have deliveries that are spread out. There is a demand for organic products nationwide."

  • Lucille
    last month

    I looked and there is a Sprout within reasonable distance. Next time my son visits I'm going to ask him to take me and hopefully they will have Strauss yogurt. While it is true that it has some carbs/sugar, a serving has little enough that it fits in my daily plan.

    Although I do think that a Strauss bowl of yogurt in lovely SunnyCalifornia with beautiful shorelines, mild temperatures, and gorgeous scenery is probably a little tastier because of the ambiance than Texas currently, battered by high heat, ERCOT warning blackouts, and more than it should have stupid government.

  • Elmer J Fudd
    last month
    last modified: last month

    A quick savory meal accompaniment using delicious plain whole milk Greek yogurt is to use it to make an approximation of Indian raita. For me, the essential ingredient for raita is chopped or grated cucumber but I think traditional recipes also add some spices. You can find many online, mix and match the ones you find to develop the flavor combos you like best.

    No more calories than the yogurt itself and lots of cooling flavor. You can even use it as a dip if that's something you like. But dip veggies, not crackers, to save calories.

  • nicole___
    last month

    @Lucille......We do shop @ Sprouts, but they're not ALL listed as stocking Straus. I honestly haven't seen it @ the one I frequent.....but I can shop down the street @ one of them that is listed.

  • maifleur03
    last month

    Reason for the negativity is that when I traveled I saw and tasted many different products that if I looked closely on the container were the words "licensed by". The company that filled the container was only using the same recipe. In the case of yogurt and other dairy products among other things the basic milk is used but the flavor of the milk will depend on what the cows eat and even if it is from the morning or evening milking. The same thing happens seasonally. A jersey cow has much richer tasting milk than a Holstein so there is also that difference.

  • Elmer J Fudd
    last month
    last modified: last month

    I thought I explained the situation with specificity. I'm not sure why you jumped to false and contradictory conclusions and continue to speculate. I gave an accurate though brief description about products and a company I'm quite familiar with that you seem to know nothing about.

  • nicole___
    last month

    I made a trip to Sprouts, the one closest to my house. They DO have Wallaby(The Australian yogurt I like) AND Straus.....they're in BIG containers ONLY. That means I have to find little containers to put it in for my husband to take in his lunch, then wash them. I'm waaaaaaaaaaaaay too lazy for that! It is better tho. They have European or Greek Strauss. 6.4oz = 120 calories for the Euro & 6.4oz = 190 Greek. The Greek I usually buy is 5.3oz = 90 calories. ♥ I really DO like Strauss! It's akin to eating cheesecake instead of cottage cheese.

  • Elmer J Fudd
    last month
    last modified: last month

    I'm glad you found it and like it. Yes, it only comes in the 32 oz tubs and it's at least a few bucks (or more) higher priced than others. But it's certified organic and MUCH richer and for me, off the scale more delicious. When we eat it at breakfast I suspect our portion is more like half a cup. When you add fruit, there's plenty to eat and enjoy.

    Maybe the picture Lucille described of the mild California climate applies equally to the happiness of dairy cows, It must motivate them to give it their all, lest they be shipped off to other parts of the state that are colder in winter AND hotter in summer than the idyllic area where they are.

    Get some small reusable containers for your husband if he likes it. He's a good guy, he's worth the little bit of effort.

  • nicole___
    last month
    last modified: last month

    I do have some little containers I put the Strauss in for my husband. I also purchased a few mangos and shredded coconut to put on it. And.....some dark chocolate covered walnuts. . ♥


    Cows giving it their all......ha ha....naw..... yogurt has a recipe .....that I'll believe.

  • Elmer J Fudd
    last month

    Mango and coconut sound like delicious things to add, either separately or even together. What time is breakfast tomorrow? I'll be there.

  • Elmer J Fudd
    last month
    last modified: last month

    You can be sure that the risk of being shipped elsewhere gives them moo-tivation to do their best. To do otherwise would be udderly ridiculous. That's no BS.

    Sorry, I may have been outside too long. We're having a few days of super hot weather but thankfully it's dry as per usual. I'll stay inside, no more silliness today.