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bill_minn_3b

Fern ID and is it a perennial?

I found this small fern in my yard. Is it worth raising it up in a pot then planting in the yard? Will it come back next season once established? It's putting out new shoots since a few days ago when I dug it out.




Comments (28)

  • peren.all Zone 5a Ontario Canada
    4 months ago

    Well worth potting up and putting in your yard. I have these and others but I have a difficult time ID-ing many of them. It should certainly return for you.


    Bill_minn_3b {West Central MN} thanked peren.all Zone 5a Ontario Canada
  • Bill_minn_3b {West Central MN}
    Original Author
    4 months ago
    last modified: 4 months ago

    Okay great!

    Main thing is the perennial part. I wanted something that would show up and get larger every season and possibly spread.

    Name isn't as important, at least now I can be sure it's a 'Fern' anyways. :-)

    It's my understanding these will enjoy shade?

    Ferns grew wild at my old place, in almost wet areas and iirc: were understory plants.

  • peren.all Zone 5a Ontario Canada
    4 months ago
    last modified: 4 months ago

    Yes Bill perfectly suited to moist soil and yes even wet depending on the fern. They grow in my forest at the edges and have gotten rather exuberant in my garden beds. I adore all ferns. My favorite is Adiantum pedatum - Northern maidenhair fern. It is native for both of us. I would be between Minneapolis and St. Cloud due east.

    p.s. Just get it planted before fall or heel in the pot for winter.

    Bill_minn_3b {West Central MN} thanked peren.all Zone 5a Ontario Canada
  • Bill_minn_3b {West Central MN}
    Original Author
    4 months ago

    Okay thanks!

    I'm NW of St. Cloud about 1-1/2 hours.


    Most likely Cystopteris fragilis


    From all the Ferns native to Minnesota, this one matches more criteria than the rest and is one of the most common ferns in this part of the State.


    It can stay in the pot until I get the planting site ready. :)


  • bengz6westmd
    4 months ago

    Could be Cinnamon fern (Osmundastrum cinnamomeum). Range:



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  • Jay 6a Chicago
    4 months ago

    When trying to ID fern species, it is often necessary to observe the undersides of the fronds.

    Bill_minn_3b {West Central MN} thanked Jay 6a Chicago
  • ken_adrian Adrian MI cold Z5
    4 months ago

    if its a rogue seedling ... might it not be best to put it out where it might seed more ... or spore.. or whatever its called .. lol ...


    ken

  • Bill_minn_3b {West Central MN}
    Original Author
    4 months ago
    last modified: 4 months ago

    Osmundastrum cinnamomeum = nope.

    Fuzzy hairs on the Fiddle heads and stems are absent.


    Jay.

    What should I be seeing? Keep in mind this is a juvenile plant.


  • Jay 6a Chicago
    4 months ago

    Why is that Ken? Ferns are motile and thus are all rogues .

    Bill_minn_3b {West Central MN} thanked Jay 6a Chicago
  • Bill_minn_3b {West Central MN}
    Original Author
    10 days ago

    The plant ended up in the shade of some lilacs and fence (left of the Taxus canadensis on the right), where it gets about 2 hours or so of direct sun daily and dappled light for a few hours. It's a smaller specimen but so far it seems to enjoy it there, so does the Taxus.



    I plan on getting a much larger fern species (unknown species) that I noticed growing out on my land in the country. I'll put that in the bare spot in front of the Taxus.

    Anyone know if it's better to dig ferns in the Fall or should I wait until spring?

  • peren.all Zone 5a Ontario Canada
    9 days ago

    You can do either but spring is ideal once the new growth begins (fiddleheads emerge).

    If quite large it could be Matteuccia struthiopteris -Ostrich fern.

    Bill_minn_3b {West Central MN} thanked peren.all Zone 5a Ontario Canada
  • Bill_minn_3b {West Central MN}
    Original Author
    9 days ago

    Thanks!

    Looking at some resources here (https://www.minnesotawildflowers.info/page/ferns-and-fern-allies), It could very well be 'Ostrich'. There may be 'Lady Fern' present here too (Athyrium filix-femina).

    I've noticed several different species of Fern at my old place. Some quite large. The fiddleheads will tell a lot. I'll try to post some pictures of the ones I bring home next spring. :-)


  • mxk3 z5b_MI
    9 days ago

    I suggest moving ferns in the fall. It's really easy to damage the fiddleheads in the spring, and if they're fully emerged, they often end up quite tattered-looking during the season after transplanting.

    Bill_minn_3b {West Central MN} thanked mxk3 z5b_MI
  • Bill_minn_3b {West Central MN}
    Original Author
    9 days ago

    When you move ferns in the Fall, do you have to wait until the fronds are completely dead?

    The reason I ask is, if I wait for woody plants to go dormant, then it's too late in the season and too close to freeze up to move them.

  • mxk3 z5b_MI
    9 days ago

    "When you move ferns in the Fall, do you have to wait until the fronds are completely dead?"


    No. I would probably get a move on it now, looking at your zone. Here in zone 5, the rule of thumb is end of October cut off for transplanting to allow enough time (~6+ weeks) before the onset of frozen ground for growth of roots to help anchor the plant and ensure winter survival. Frost isn't a problem, but frozen ground is. I've planted/tranplanted into November successfully when I was about 25-ish miles east = one zone higher, but not at this place. Anyway, I don't know what your conditions are like up in MN and when the ground freezes, but I imagine its earlier than here.

    Bill_minn_3b {West Central MN} thanked mxk3 z5b_MI
  • Bill_minn_3b {West Central MN}
    Original Author
    9 days ago

    Ok thanks.

    I'll get back to you.

  • Bill_minn_3b {West Central MN}
    Original Author
    9 days ago

    We've been getting our first killing frost middle of Oct. these last few years, instead of mid september like it used to be. Ground freeze comes sometime in November.

    This is about as late as I dare plant to be safe.

    Here's what i got.

    Should I mulch the rhizome for winter (cover it completely)?

  • Bill_minn_3b {West Central MN}
    Original Author
    8 days ago

    Sorry I can't post more, my pc died.

    Lost everything..

    I'll get that fixed and return with more info.

  • Bill_minn_3b {West Central MN}
    Original Author
    6 days ago
    last modified: 6 days ago

    PC is in the shop but I'll try to do this using my phone.

    I believe my transplant is an ostridge fern (Matteuccia struthiopteris).

    The large, multi-frond plants marked earlier in the season for transplanting, were so dead and brown by the time I got there, I wasn't sure if they would grow again (we've had severe drought all summer).

    So I went to another area where smaller plants (3-4 fronds) were growing and dug one of those.

    Not sure if the latter are the same plants as my original picks.

    The one l planted has the grooved 'celery' stalks and single veins on the leaf underside. Here's a leaf growing next to where I dug.


    I also dug one of the larger, dead brown specimens just to see if it revives next season.


    My goal was to acquire a larger fern that grows with the 'vase' form. So no matter what kind it is, I'll be fine with it. :-)

  • Bill_minn_3b {West Central MN}
    Original Author
    5 days ago
    last modified: 5 days ago

    Interesting side note.

    When you look under 'bracken fern' Pteridium aquilinum it shows a large area of minnesota marked in red, as extinct, including my county.

    As far as I can tell, I have bracken ferns on my land.

    https://www.minnesotawildflowers.info/page/ferns-and-fern-allies

  • shaxhome (Frog Rock, Australia 9b)
    4 days ago

    Bracken is a common weed throughout Oz, invading native plant areas, gardens, riparian zones, practically everywhere. From my reading, it grows in the USA from southern Alaska to northern Mexico, so I doubt that it's in any danger of extinction soon!

    Bill_minn_3b {West Central MN} thanked shaxhome (Frog Rock, Australia 9b)
  • Bill_minn_3b {West Central MN}
    Original Author
    4 days ago

    I was surprised to see that red area on the map, made me think there must've been a mistake.

    I tried to contact them but their email link was inoperatve.

    If they are extinct, that will make the ones on my land worth more. ;-)

  • shaxhome (Frog Rock, Australia 9b)
    4 days ago

    Here ya go, Bill. Help yourself to some of ours!



    Bill_minn_3b {West Central MN} thanked shaxhome (Frog Rock, Australia 9b)
  • Bill_minn_3b {West Central MN}
    Original Author
    4 days ago

    Thanks!

    I was going to ask what kind of Ferns you have there.

    The ostridge fern is about as big as they get in these parts, maybe 4-5 ft. long fronds with 10 to 12 fronds per plant.

    I'll bet you have some really large specimens down there?

  • shaxhome (Frog Rock, Australia 9b)
    4 days ago
    last modified: 4 days ago

    Well, my favourites are the glorious tree ferns, but there are many others...

    Australian Ferns





    Bill_minn_3b {West Central MN} thanked shaxhome (Frog Rock, Australia 9b)
  • Bill_minn_3b {West Central MN}
    Original Author
    4 days ago

    Tree ferns? That would be something to see. Nothing like that around here. The Dinosaurs must've loved them.

    Thanks for sharing those.

  • thefof Zone 8/9 UK
    4 days ago

    Tree Ferns are gorgeous.

    Here in the UK you can buy, at most garden centres, Dicksonia antarctica, the soft tree fern or man fern.

    I am sorry to say this, but I get VERY p****ed off, and angry. These are, I admit, collected under licences issued by, usually, the Victoria Forestry, and also, I believe, Tasmania Forestry.

    They are, to all intents and purposes, the by-product of clear felling, often of old growth forests.

    It is the only species that can be propagated from stem sections.

    Large specimens (5m-15m) can be several hundred years old, with growth rates of up to 5cm/yr.

    Here in Cornwall there are quite a few old specimens, many of which arrived here in the 1800s as ballast in ships returning from Australia.

    Cyathea australis (Rough Tree Fern) Bunya Mountains, Qld


    Dicksonia antarctica, Trelissick Gardens, Cornwall



    Fof


    Bill_minn_3b {West Central MN} thanked thefof Zone 8/9 UK