things from your past that would baffle young people today?

sal 60 Hanzlik

dial phones

black and white tv with no remote and only 3 channels

I could go on but want to leave room for you. lol

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HU-178658043

Winding a wrist watch.

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gadgets

No computers/internet

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hallngarden

Phone with operator, number please

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jkayd_il5

A take home report card with deportment given a grade.

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chisue

A hat, little white gloves, a girdle, a garter belt, stockings -- all of which I wore for endless ours on an airplane to Paris on our honeymoon. (Along with all the other ladies.)

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Lars

A report card with grades for penmanship

Anything with cursive handwriting

Women's stockings with seams (I barely remember those myself.)

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Lucille

Spending the day playing with no one checking on you

Outhouses

Delivery by the milkman

Almost never delivery of fast food

Kerosene and wood stoves

Going to places that required you to wear a dress

Good Humor ice cream trucks

Doctors coming to your house

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jim_1 (Zone 9A)

Almost anything that I take for granted.

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Olychick

phone booth

camera film

tape recorded music

manual shift cars

wing windows on cars

no seatbelts or carseats

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Elmer J Fudd

I don't know about being baffled but the only thing on Lucille's list that I experienced personally as a kid was an ice cream truck.

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chloebud

Typewriter

Thomas Guide

This topic made me think of something I saw on Ellen DeGeneres' show awhile back.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=updE5LVe6tg&list=LLi7jVt3WucDTBN5rX8IwjnQ&index=203

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dees_1

Assessing adults as Miss/Mrs./Mr. [Last Name].

Listening/obeying teachers and or any adult (also known as respecting elders).

Getting a (fitting) punishment when you did something wrong.....today, that's known as child abuse.

Taking care of the things you owned.

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Richard (Vero Beach, Florida)

Flipping a bucket to draw water to fill the wringer washer. (and anything else we needed water for)

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fnmroberts

No electricity or running water.


One room school with grades K-8 together with a single teacher.

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Annegriet

A telephone with a long cord attached to it. To get privacy we used to stretch the cord from the kitchen to the coat closet.

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nickel_kg

Slide ruler (to be honest I don't know how to use one myself, but at least I know what it is!)

Ice pick (those things look too dangerous to have been so common!)

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Fun2BHere

A world without video screens.

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Judy Good

A party line on the phone, sharing a bedroom, babysitting siblings, Turntable for music or recording on the radio with tape player.


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caflowerluver

Having to go to the library to look things up and research a school report.

Typing 2 copies of a typed paper or using carbon paper in between sheets of paper to make a copy. No copy machines.

Having to do math by hand with pencil and paper or in your head because calculators were just being available and were super expensive.

Forced to wear a dress to school every day and having to kneel to make sure the hem touched the ground and wasn't too short.

Using a paper map when traveling and being able to fold it back up correctly.

Only 4 stations; CBS, ABC, NBC & PBS on TV and watching summer reruns to catch the shows you missed. Nothing on after midnight except playing the National Anthem before they went to static.

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functionthenlook

Road side picnic tables.

Car chains

Wind up alarm clocks

Pay toilets

In my city, street cars. They are long gone.



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smiling

crank handles to crank down the car windows, no electric windows

all stores closed on Sundays

debutante balls

4-digit phone numbers, no area codes

mail without ZIP codes

no disposable diapers, only re-usable cloth with diaper pins

double-feature at the movies, after the Newsreel and the Cartoon

door-to-door salesmen peddling vacuums, encyclopedias, knives, cookware sets

a radio in a car was an expensive upgrade, especially to get FM as well as AM

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Ladydi Zone 7A NW BC Canada

We use to also get awards at the end of the school year for perfect attendance. I didn't miss a day of school until grade 8

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orchidrain_still

Cut-out paper dolls along with their clothes.

"Credit" given by neighborhood stores by handwriting your item/price on a receipt book.

Air raid sirens tested every Saturday

Being sent to the (live) chicken market to have them pick one for you.

Expanding screens to put in your open windows.

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eld6161

Going to the library and using the card catalogue to search for your book!

Honestly, I don’t think I ever got the hang of it.

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Olychick

"crank handles to crank down the car windows, no electric windows"

I have a 2000 Ford truck with crank windows...my grandson is appalled by how hard it makes his life when we take it places and he has to roll down his window, lol. It's also a manual shift, the only one in his life that I know of.

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maire_cate

The Fuller Brush Man

Insurance agents making monthly visits to the home to collect premiums.

Home delivery of milk and eggs - and milk boxes on the back porch.

Colorforms, baby dolls - before fashion dolls came on the scene

Baseball cards

Weaving folded newspapers to make 'sit upons.'

Metal looms and loops to weave potholders that were too small to be practical

Erector sets

Checking TV tubes at the local Woolworth store

Spoolies

Bookbags, pencil boxes, inkwells

Bissell sweepers - no electricity, just a roller brush

Davey Crockett and coonskin hats

Lining up in the school gym for the polio vaccine in sugar cubes

Cone bras

Bomb drills, sitting under our school desks during the Cuban Missile Crises

Sock hops, poodle skirts, saddle shoes,

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eld6161

Color form!

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OutsidePlaying

Stick shift and ‘3-on-the-tree’

4-digit phone numbers

party lines

walking to and from school

parking brakes you had to pull up from the floor with a handle

slide rule (yes, I know how to use one...found my old one recently)

bomb shelters

portable transistor radios


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grapefruit1_ar

A tape recorder.

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kathyg_in_mi

Roller skates with keys.

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Jasdip

Shorthand!

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bragu_DSM 5

8 track tapes

the first tape recorders with a wire as a recording device 1940s

reel to reel tape

trs 80 computers

subscribing to a magazine so you could program TANK in basic

bomb shelters

64k memories in computers


ETA

learning how to bank coal in the furnace for overnight

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Elmer J Fudd

Slide rules, yikes!. I used one for college chemistry and physics. I remember "lubricating" the slide before exams by pulling it out and running the two edges along a bar of Ivory soap, to make sure it would slide smoothly and not catch when used. I did the same thing on the outside of the device so that the clear plastic thing with the line through it would also move smoothly.


Did you do that, Outside Playing?

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wildchild2x2

Children sent to the corner store to buy cigarettes for their parents.

Kids running in and out of neighborhood homes and being fed by whoever's mom was making lunch.

Leaving things out in plain sight without fear of theft.

PE shower checks.

Pocket knives in schools. Considered tools not weapons.

Rifle club in high schools.

Toy guns that looked real yet somehow none were mistaken for the real thing by anyone.

School clothes, play clothes and party clothes.

Fun houses with giant wooden discs everyone sat on that spun faster and faster before tossing everyone off. We all walked around with floor burns from those and the wooden roller rink floors.

Speaking of roller rinks working that rosin powder into the unfinished maple wood after it was sprinkled from the powder can (an old coffee or paint can). If you wore black clothes they were white when you left. No masks for the powder inhalation, no helmets or protective gear for speed club.

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sephia_wa

A black & white TV with rabbit ears and a limited number of channels. I remember my dad would put tin foil on the rabbit ears trying to get better reception.

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Annie Deighnaugh

I remember all of them on Lucille's list....only I've still never had any meals delivered.

Floor starter button on a car, setting the spark, choke and/or throttle.

Telephone prefixes like BUtterfield... mine was AMherst.

Person-to-person call.

Clutch pedal.

Carburetor. Distributor cap. Bumper jack.

Movie projector. Slide carousel.

Film for a camera.





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Rose Pekelnicky

I have a landline and a wall phone in my kitchen. One day my son's family was visiting, we were eating in the kitchen and my phone rang. I answered it and was speaking to the caller when my 4 yr old grandson looked at his dad and said "What is that?". He is only familiar with cell phones.

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bpath

Air raid drills. They’d be baffled that anyone thought hiding under our desks would prot3ct us from a nuclear bomb.

Knowing the milkman, mailman, and paperboy (on a bike) by name and by face, because they actually came up to the house. Well, the paperboy (Jordy, from 3 blocks over) came only once a month, to collect. DH also had an egg man. He kept delivering a dozen eggs every other day until DMIL finally told him they were down to a household of 3 instead of 11. And had been for 5 years. I don’t know what she did with all the eggs, probably gave them to her neighbors.

Do you think in 5 years there won’t be snow days anymore? Because we know how to “pivot” to school online? My grandchildren might find snow days quaint, just as my kids found it quaint that DH and I had to get up early to listen to the radio to see if our schools were closed so we could go back to bed!

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blfenton

Punch cards for writing computer programs on. You did not want to drop your punch cards, ever.

We still have ice cream trucks in our neighbourhood or at least last summer we did.

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seniorgal

Crystal radio set. Butchering your own meat. Hectograph, penny pencils, pencil tablets, no Kleenex-hankies only. plastic slide rule we used in war time Radio engineering course I attended. We had classes 8 hours a day, six days a week. Only half of us were able to complete that course. No potato chips, only 3 kinds of dry cereal- -puffed wheat, puffed rice, cornflakes. Dancing in a beautiful ballroom, orchestra in suits and ties, girl singers in lovely gowns, romantic dance music.

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Elizabeth

Playing jacks.

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skibby (zone 4 Vermont)

Real popcorn.

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adellabedella_usa

Lol! I had to call dh one day so my kids would believe the story of driving a 5 speed stick shift.


Party lines

Computers you had to program yourself to get it to do one thing and no internet.

Pop bottles and the machines you pulled them from.

Mailing a letter


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lily316

Cap guns playing cops and robbers. Three-digit phone numbers with operators. Party lines. 21 cent movies for under 12. No pants for girls in high school or college. Going steady and wearing class rings on a chain around your neck. 5 and 10 cent stores.

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amylou321

I have a crank style window in my car. I dont have power locks either. It's a 2004. When my oldest niece was 15,she discovered them and thought it was the neatest thing ever. I managed to convince her that I had to pay extra to get them. 😁

A lot of this stuff mentioned here i grew up with........I am young dang it!!!!

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arkansas girl

They say kids don't know what a typewriter is. I have a truck with crank windows and manual locks too! Seems like most anything I can think of has already been mentioned.

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Lars

Ice cream trucks never left us. Neither did crank style windows or manual shift transmission with a clutch pedal - and I have these in my current car from the previous decade.

I also remember air raid drills, and they scared me no end and caused nightmares (I think) during my early childhood. As a child, I never expected human civilization to survive into the 21th Century.

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Annie Deighnaugh

Putting pennies in you penny loafers.

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Elizabeth

Popcorn socks that you twisted to the side to make a spiral design. Knee socks.

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HamiltonGardener

Navigating to and through unfamiliar places without GPS on their phones. That includes reading a map...without the phone verbally telling them to turn right in 200 meters.


And really, they are baffled about how to keep themselves occupied without the internet/phones/video games.



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bpath

My local grocery store will load your groceries into your car for you. I always have to tell the "newbies" that I don't have power sliding doors or rear hatch. A teen asked me if they were broken. No, says I, it just didn't have them. Kid asks "wow, how old IS this car?" (Answer: younger than you, kid)

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bpath

Elizabeth, popcorn socks??

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HU-753479426

We still have ice cream trucks on Cape Cod in the summer - they go to all of the beaches. Wish we had taco trucks when I was a kid!

seagrass

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Raye Smith

Pneumatic tubes in department store that processed metal charge cards. Shoppers Charge and Master Charge cards with an imprinter.

Being in an elementary class of >30 children and none were obese.

The two tallest, strongest boy being chosen as "crossing guards", they used a metal 12ft pole with a flag on the end to stop traffic, even in storms.

Square dancing in gym class. Wearing regulation bloomers in girls only gym class.

All drum brakes that were very difficult to stop after they got wet. That crunching sound they made when stopping wet.

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Annie Deighnaugh

carbon paper and mimeograph paper and machines ... and the fragrance!

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Annie Deighnaugh

S&H green stamps

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arcy_gw

Getting permission from my parents first, to wear pants to school--then later jeans.

Getting parents the phone number of where you were going.

Dinner time meant the entire family sat at a table, together eating.

Sunday morning passing families coming and going to Church.

Being home before the street lights came on.

Never referring to or using adults' first name.

HOURS re-typing a term paper on a PICA manual all due to one typo.

Waiting months too see vacation pictures--first using up the roll then the processing.

Hard candy stuck to the inside of your socks, candy with sock fuzz on it at Christmas.

Lining up down the hall through the gym to get vaccines.

4" thick map books to find your way in Mpls.

Waiting for the MLS to come out--weekly? with new homes on the market.

Men is dapper uniforms filling the car with gas, washing the windows as we sat and giggled as they made faces at us.

Being told a girl had never applied to be a pizza cook before me.

Making $.50 as hour for babysitting.

Working for less than$3.00 an hour, 40 hrs. a week all summer paid for an entire year of college.

Four years of college, two years of grad school and no loans!

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Elizabeth

Popcorn socks in the 1950's were white cotton knitted ankle socks with a good deal of stretch. They had a raised circular design that resembled popcorn. The design went up and down in rows but you could grab the top, twist it sideways and had a diagonal pattern. What else would you wear with your saddle shoes or penny loafers?

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Ont_Gal

Ashtrays

go-go boots

buying cigarettes in a regular store for Grand Dad for 50cents!

Home phone numbers starting with letters-1960's Scarborough- Ampherst 1-4221

Little ice cream cups with a little wooden spoon inside the lid

Dollar bills or pennies

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Jasdip

The first 4 years of school was in a one-room school. Grades 1-8, in the country. The older kids could help the younger ones if the teacher was busy with the other grades.

I remember the snowbanks being so high that the plow had 2 blades on to cut the bank back on the top. This created a shelf so as a kid, of course we walked on top of that.

Our teacher would cancel classes in the afternoon and we'd go outside and rake leaves, make piles and play in them; make snowforts and have snowball fights etc.

When we went to the new school in town it wasn't the same of course. Strict rules, so many kids, it was an adjustment.

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OutsidePlaying

Elmer, yes! I had forgotten about the ivory soap trick we used until you reminded me.

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nickel_kg

Raye_Smith, my 5th grade teacher loved square dancing and all things "Little House on the Prairie". Actually I did enjoy learning the steps and hand holds and the calls, and moving in time with seven other kids to form the square. I'm not creative enough to dance free-form, but tell me to do-si-do, okay I knew what that meant: Clomp, clomp, clomp!

Grease pencils - red or black wax core, covered with a spiral of thick paper so you "sharpened" them by peeling off another layer of paper. Mom used them to label boxes and things, we simply played with them.

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adellabedella_usa

We still had two grades to a classroom when I started school.


Our neighborhood still has an ice cream truck come through during the summer and warm winter days.

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JoanMN

Boy, talk about a walk down memory lane!

We lived on a farm, I still have never seen an ice cream truck except on tv.

I remember Mom cutting a switch. I hardly ever had it used on me, I had enough sense to keep a low profile and not mouth off. Glass baby bottles when I had my babies. Couldn't afford formula and breast-feeding didn't work for me, so my babies had raw cow's milk that I scalded and put some Karo syrup in (to prevent constipation, I guess). I was the oldest of 6, so helped watched the younger kids a lot.

Thankfully, only six kids, my mom came from a family of 18 kids. They really had a tough childhood, as far as money went. Lard sandwiches! Yuck.

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eld6161

Annie, I put dimes in my penny loafers in case I needed to make a phone call!

How about the rubber band to hold your stack of books together?

Making a homemade book cover out of a brown paper bag.

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nicole___

Ivory soap that floated. ☺ Invented by accident...

Palmolive commercials with Madge. Toilet paper commercials with Mr. Whipple.

Cigarette commercials on TV with cowboys/Marlboro man.

Space food sticks, so you too can eat like an astronaut. Tang.

Clackers, toy.


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jupidupi

We called mimeograph copies "dittos" and they were frequently slightly damp. The teacher handed them out and everyone immediately smelled theirs. Maybe we were trying to get high? Do school kids still have those paint sets with the primary colors plus black, where yellow ran out way before the other colors? Iodine pills that tasted like malted milk, given out in grade school. Sneaking contraband oleomargarine across the state line into Wisconsin. Reading the back of the cereal box where contests always said, "Void in Wisconsin."

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HamiltonGardener

Nickel,

Unfortunately, Little House on the Prairie is no longer considered acceptable for children due to its culturally insensitive content. They even stripped her name off of the Laura Ingalls Wilder prize.

It’s one of those times I despair of the cancel culture.


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honibaker

Milk chutes...our 1955 house had one which was used for milk delivery for years. Once mom didn't check it on time and the milk froze and shattered the glass bottles.

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chisue

Phone booths. Collect calls. Long distance operator saying, "Please try your call later. All circuits are busy." Telegrams. Flimsy, light blue airmail stationery. One-cent stamps and penny post cards. Planning what to say in advance of an expensive long-distance call. Fountain pens and jars of ink; no ball-points. Only your teacher had a *color* pencil (red). A pencil sharpener in every classroom. (Can you smell the wood shavings right now?)

Pulling down the indow shades while the (weird) kid from 'Audio' rolled in a projector and set up an Educational Film -- narrated by the One Announcer on Earth, hired for his monotone.

Magnifiers on tiny TV screens. Knobs to adjust the 'roll' and later, color. The enormous size and weight of tube TVs. Waiting for radio and TV tubes to 'warm up'.

Twenty-five cartoons at the movies on Saturday morinings, and kids dropped off to wait in line without adult supervision.

Water bags hanging on cars preparing to cross the desert. Bug screens mounted on car hoods. A very limited choice of paint color for cars. New metal license plates to install every year; no 'stickers'.

Your own doctor attended you in hospital -- not a hosptial staffer, a 'hospitalist'. You'd expect to be in the hospital at least overnight for many procedures that are now 'out-patient'. Facing surgery meant facing the nausea brought on by ether, and pain was inadequately treated.




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Ded tired

Jackets and snow pants made entirely of wool that would eventually get wet and freeze.


Chapped legs

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Elmer J Fudd

"Unfortunately, Little House on the Prairie is no longer considered acceptable for children due to its culturally insensitive content. They even stripped her name off of the Laura Ingalls Wilder prize.

It’s one of those times I despair of the cancel culture."

I'm not familiar with the term "cancel culture" but I think I see it from the context of use.

Try this: If you were African American, and saw the movement going on to remove Confederate flags from state symbols, to remove statues of Confederate officers from public places, to rename streets and places (and military bases) named for traitorous Confederate leaders, would you similarly "despair of the cancel culture"? I don't think so.

My point is - you need to see things from the side of the minorities for whom many symbols and practices from bygone days do not resonate well and never did. In the past, their voices weren't loud enough or didn't matter to people in power to have the any effect. They do now, to right wrongs that never should have happened in the first place.

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blfenton

Someone mentioned pennies being put into loafers.

Pennies

In 2012 Canada stopped producing pennies. so a lot of kids won't understand the saying "A penny for your thoughts" and won't understand why something that costs 1.99 is actually going to cost you 2.00

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blfenton

@arcy - you and I had the same upbringing and same experiences. I was nodding at all your memories. And yes retyping term papers. I remember getting an electric typewriter, the IBM selectric from my parents and being so excited.

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HamiltonGardener

Elmer,

I’m a Canadian Mi’kmaq. I have my status card. I’m actually of mixed native and European ancestry.

Much of the reasoning around cancelling Laura Ingalls was how natives were depicted in her books.

So, I might just see things from the side of minorities. Just possibly.

And I LOVED the Little House on the Prairie books. So many little girls did...so few authors who can give adventure from a little girls perspective and aimed toward little girls...and these were real life adventures!! Erasing LIW is heartbreaking.

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Raye Smith

Small Pox vaccination scars

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bragu_DSM 5

the Kool aid man

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bpath

Raye, yes! When we were watching Outlander, we noticed the scar had meaning and wondered if younger (when did they stop vaccinating in the US) noticed it right away? When the Covid vaccine came out we were talking about how to know if someone had received it. I suggested that they could design it to leave a scar. My son was curious so we showed him ours. He found it very odd.

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HamiltonGardener

The Kool Aid man is still around. I see ads with him and my niece and nephew know who he is.

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rob333 (zone 7a)

But do you want to have these things still? How maudlin is this thread? Y'all are making me laugh. I am so glad to put a lot of this stuff behind me.

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Elmer J Fudd

"So, I might just see things from the side of minorities. Just possibly."

Fine, nice backgrounder. Despite that, your comment suggests that you don't. No different than those who talk and chafe about what they call "political correctness". Wanting to continue wrongs and bigoted practices from past times when such conduct was acceptable isn't excused as "following traditions". Wrong is wrong, hurtful is hurtful, it's never too late to fix mistakes that never should have been and change.

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bpath

Rob, I thought it would be things that would baffle our kids, not necessarily things we want back. (Like air raid drills. Although, it was a break from the day.) On the other hand, I never did have an ice cream man in the neighborhood, just one who parked by the lagoon park in summer. We would sometimes drive home from my piano lesson past him, and we might stop for an ice cream bar or a drumstick, but my lessons were from September to May so we probably only got ice cream there a couple of times a year. I recall visiting cousins downstate and they had an ice cream man! But he came by just before a big family dinner and the parents said too close to dinner plus we’d spoil our company clothes, so I STILL didn’t get even a popsicle. Once, just once, an cream truck was coming through our neighborhood just a few years ago, but no one else was home and I couldn’t hear where the sound was coming from, so I missed out yet again. One of these days!

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phyllis__mn

How about stores that had cashiers in a sort of balcony, payments were put in a sort of tube by your salesperson and it would be whisked to the cashier and then your change and sales slip would be sent back. I think l must have been very young at the time, but I do remember being entranced by them!

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skibby (zone 4 Vermont)

Counting back change.

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Raye Smith

phyllis__mn - those were the pneumatic tubes that sent your charge card and slip up to the cashier for processing that I mentioned.

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HamiltonGardener

This


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HamiltonGardener

This



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raee_gw zone 5b-6a Ohio

Actually being able to, and expected to, learn without entertaining computer programs.

By the time my daughter was entering kindergarten ~30 years ago, already many children didn't recognize a phone with a rotary dial.

When she had to go to a private school one summer for day care (AMs were devoted to French classes and other subjects) she was shocked to experience a classroom where the students were expected to keep their feet on the floor, be quiet unless called upon, and raise their hands to be called upon. I was shocked to learn that her regular public school didn't have such standards!

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maddielee

“Air raid drills. They’d be baffled that anyone thought hiding under our desks would prot3ct us from a nuclear bomb”

Sadly, now they have active shooter drills.

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floral_uk z.8/9 SW UK

Writing cheques. Even carrying cash is weird now.

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hallngarden

Saving the Blue Horse labels on our notebook paper. Mailing them in for a beanie.

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roxsol

The absence of cup holders in cars, theatres, shopping carts, ride on lawn mowers, baby strollers....

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jkayd_il5

Typewriter correction fluid

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Izzy Mn

A game of tag with the neighborhood kids could last for hours well into the night, or at least until someone tripped and fell. That's how I broke off my front teeth. Tag games were suspended for a few weeks.


Rotary phones. I had my grandparents old black desktop model (wish I had kept it) My sons friend tried take a phone call on it. I tried to show him how to use it finally sent him upstairs to use push button phone.

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bpath

Maddie, I heard that some of the younger staffers at the Capitol knew what to do, lock and barricade doors, turn out lights, be quiet, due to active shooter drills they had in school.

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Elmer J Fudd

"Typewriter correction fluid"

Liquid Paper was "invented" by the mother of a person who is/was in the public eye (more so some years ago than now). He's likely familiar/known to most baby boomers. Know who called the inventor "Mom"?

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beesneeds

Not using a calculator

Using only a couple reference books for schoolwork- having to know/use card indexes at the library to look up books. Honorable mentions to looking through stacks of paper newspapers and using micro-fiche.

Hardcopy cartography skills- no GPS.

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nickel_kg

Elmer, without looking, was it Michael Nesmith of The Monkees? I thought she invented 3M sticky notes, though. Now that I've stated my guess, can I google??

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Elmer J Fudd

Wow, very quick. That's it. Nesmith likely made far more money from this than from being a Monkee. He was an only child and inherited his mother's wealth.

He's probably the one member of the group that had much in the way of musical ability and it wasn't all that much. He did write several songs I like, including "Different Drum" (done best by Linda Ronstadt), "Joanne", and "Some of Shelly's Blues" (recorded by many). You may not recognize the third title but if you look it up to listen on You Tube, you've probably heard it.

He had a quirky habit during concerts (I've seen him a number of times, including once about 7-8 years ago) of stopping between songs to introduce what the setting or scene was in his head that the lyrics describe. While most song writers will often say that a melody came to them in their sleep and the lyrics started with a billboard or TV commercial they saw (ie, something random), for these songs, it was as if each song described a tableau, an interaction between individuals. A specific setting and scene, as if a movie script. It was an odd thing to do and didn't add much to the entertainment but it allowed him to space out a limited repertoire so as to take up more time.

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HU-753479426

The word "Baffle"...

seagrass

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Richard (Vero Beach, Florida)

(By Not on display - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=24768272)


Being able to buy half a twin pop (or whatever they were called).


Eating the ice cream off the top of the cone and taking it back to the window for a refill. There was a charge but it was less than buying another cone. (Dairy Queen)

Fizz Niks:



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bpath

Nickel, PostIt’s were supposedly invented by a fellow at 3M. They working on adhesives that would work in space. This particular one didn’t make the cut, but the fellow found that he could use them to Mark his bible in bible study at church.

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bpath

Elmer, Peter did play his instruments in The Monkees. Stephen Stills recommended him for the part, having known him in the folk scene.

I was flipping through some Saturday tv a while back and was shocked to see a grade-school-age Mickey Dolenz on an old series called Circus Boy! I never knew that about him!

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nickel_kg

thanks Elmer, that was interesting. I listened to a video of him singing the Shelly's Blues song ... very nice. I'm inspired to look into more of his work. Cool!

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bpath

Richard, you could buy half a twin pop at the STORE? I had to buy them off my brothers, usually in trade.

I do remember FotoMat, and Fox Photo (Look for the Fox).

FizzNik? I don’t remember! I’m sure I’d have been all over it! We did, however, have Shake-A-Puddin’ in our school lunchboxes!

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Richard (Vero Beach, Florida)

Yes, it may have been 3 cents for a half, 5 or 6 cents for a whole. Just break it in half and leave the remaining half in the wrapper, another kid would later come along and buy it. It was at my Aunts store though.

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Elizabeth

Fine tuning the UHF TV dial.

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bpath

UHF, for that matter!

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wildchild2x2

When TV dinners came in aluminum trays and had to be baked in the oven. Some even came with soup and dessert.



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Elmer J Fudd

"Elmer, Peter did play his instruments in The Monkees. Stephen Stills recommended him for the part, having known him in the folk scene."

I'd heard that too. With a bit more detail - why he was able to mention Tork, is that Stills had gone to a casting call for the Monkees and was told he wasn't exactly what they were looking for. And then something was said like "thanks for coming and oh, before you go, do you know anyone else who might be interested in talking to us about a part?"

Stills has more talent and creativity in his big toe than the four Monkees had added up all together. It would have been a waste of time for him, I don't want to think about what songs and what projects he was involved with that might never have happened had he been signed up for a Monkees role.

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roxsol

My sister loved watching The Monkees television show.

I find it hilarious that Jimi Hendrix was the opening act for The Monkees when they toured the USA. What an odd pairing.

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nickel_kg

Bpath, thanks for the 3M / Post-it clarification. imagine a world without sticky notes ... I don't think my old office could have functioned!

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Elmer J Fudd

I didn't know that, roxsol. What an awful combination, each had very distinct fan bases that seemingly would have had little overlap and nothing in common.

Going to see the Monkees would have been like going to see the Partridge Family - the cast of a TV show that wasn't a serious rock group. Look for young teenyboppers, mostly female. Not the Hendrix crowd at all.

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Annie Deighnaugh

"Please be kind. Rewind"

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Elizabeth

"When not in use, turn off the juice"

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wildchild2x2

"if it's yellow, let it mellow"

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Rho Dodendron

Stepping off an airplane to find relatives standing there to greet us. They just walked into airport from parking lot and down concorse to gate.

Just last summer I pulled out my 1972 electric typewriter to spend a morning with 5 year old grandson typing sentances. He had lots of fun.

Mom would give us kids a dime, we'd hop on our Bicycles, and ride a mile to the corner drug store to buy ice cream bars. No one would have thought to call the police that us children were unsupervised.

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wildchild2x2

A deep tan was a sign of good health. If someone was pale during summer they were considered less healthy. Friends that burned would do almost anything to get at least a hint of tan.

Mixing baby oil, vinegar and iodine for sunning was common and laying out season started in the spring so we'd be good and dark by beach season.

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bpath

Not childhood, but early adulthood: my grad school carpool buddy and I would stop at the 7-11, get a longneck each, and nurse the beers on our 40 mile drive home. Without fear of getting a ticket for it. Not saying it was a good thing, but my kids would be baffled by it.

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jemdandy

An auger and bits for bring holes in wood.

Wood plane and hand saw.

Kerosene lamps and lanterns.

Kerosene cook stove.

Shoe lasts and last-stand. In the past, shoe heels were attached with shoe nails. The nail heads were recessed in holes, but when a heel wore down to the nail, the nail would begin to poke the wearer's heel. This could be repaired using a shoe-last to get a couple more months wear.

A wood or coal burning stove in the living room for heat.

No running water and no bathroom.

Pitcher pump.

Inner tubes and tube patching kits.

Foot treadle sewing machine and a quilting frame.

Splitting firewood with an axe, maul and wedges.

Using a 2 person crosscut saw.

Writing on large, wall mounted, chalk boards made of real slate -- Chalk erasers.

Writing with a dip pen and ink bottle.

Picking corn by hand using a corn-pick.

Smoking tobacco came in small cloth bags; The more expensive tobacco came in cans with friction fit lids.

Graveled roads.

Making hot pads on a small weaving frame.


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arcy_gw

LOL jimdandy we have/use many of those NOW!!


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Raye Smith

Jemdandy - you just reminded me - clapping erasers and the big cloud they made.

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Elizabeth

A Church Key

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lgmd_gaz

In a car the head light dimmer switch on the floor next to the break pedal.

School desks with ink wells that the teacher filled when students were leaning to write with an ink pen. By the time I started school there was pre filled ink pens, so the wells were no longer used, but those desks were still in use.


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anneliese32

Jemdandy, thanks for the reminders, used most of them myself.

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desertsteph

stomping grapes, having a job at age 13


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raee_gw zone 5b-6a Ohio

lgmd, I remember sitting at the wooden desks with holes for inkpots, decorative wrought iron frames, and with the back of the seat forming the front of the seat behind. That school had been built in 1923 IIRC, and I was there in the early 1960s - still had the old desks.

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honibaker

Ink cartridges for fountain pens. We did not have access (in school) to ball point pens until the late 1950's.

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Anne

I am only 50 but we had party phone line, Rural Route mail address, milk delivery ( one of my kids actually gets milk delivery) and I think we could here. We have a farm market I go to which has the same creameries products so I buy there. A real telephone operator; we would call them on every holiday to wish them a happy whatever and one of my brothers had one sing Happy Birthday to me once. I basically grew up in Mayberry

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Lars

maire_cate, you can still buy the looms and loops to make potholders, but now they offer them in a larger size as well as the original size. I made a lot of these when I was 5-7 years old, and I would give them to my teachers and relatives. I enjoyed combining the colors and making new patterns. I used about three different weaving patterns, including a sort of twill. Generally, I did not weave a loop as one piece but divided it into two strands, at least for the warp. The weft had to be a complete loop, however.

HamiltonGardener, you can still buy paper folding maps, but they are not as ubiquitous as they used to be. I generally have to order them, as I have a very difficult time finding them in service stations these days. I've had less trouble finding them in Mexico.

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Annie Deighnaugh

We get our paper maps from AAA.

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maire_cate

Lars - that link brought back so many memories. I think our looms only made a 5 or 6" potholder so we'd sew 4 together to make them large enough. How nice to see that you can still buy them.

For Christmas I ordered a tabletop loom from France for my 37 yr. old daughter. She's the artistic and crafty one in our family and since she's furloughed she's has plenty of times to work on projects.

You mentioned report cards with grades for penmanship. My handwriting was legible but definitely not the Palmer method and I still remember getting a D in penmanship in 4th grade.

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Annie Deighnaugh


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bragu_DSM 5

counting back change ...

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samkarenorkaren

Carbon paper for typewriter

Transistor radio

Phone booths

Playing outside

Record players

110 film for Kodak Instamatic camera

Poloroid camera

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Indigo Rose

This thread has been such fun! Gas stations with the ding-ding as you drove over the hose, with a number of neatly uniformed attendants all working at the same time, checking tires, fluids, washing windshields and filling the tank...ln later years their give-aways of drinking glasses,, and at grocery stores, entire sets of china, piece by piece.

Coal rumbling down the metal chute into the basement of grammar school. Every child going home for lunch at that same school - no cafeteria.

The 'hot line' -dial a certain number and other teens would be yelling 'hello' or their phone number until someone was clear enough to answer (you could hear others in the distance.)

One car towing another with a rope or chain.

Racing downhill at breakneck speeds on wooden sleds with poor steering, metal runners, some with sharp points in the back

Wax lips

Chemistry sets in basement with glass test tubes and hazardous chemicals.

Constantly adjusting the color on the tv to minimize orange or other off color faces.

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Lucille

Hops

No, not beer. The school dances.


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HamiltonGardener

you can still buy paper folding maps, but they are not as ubiquitous as they used to be.


Lars,

You can buy them, but kids would be baffled on how to use them to navigate the world without Siri’s voice telling them which lane to be in and when to turn.

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jkayd_il5

Cloth diapers pinned on with a big safety pin. Diaper pails.

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Lars


Evidently, they might have trouble folding maps as well.

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bleusblue2

Ice delivery. The truck comes down the street and on a hot day the driver lets the children grab pieces of ice to suck.

Rag man comes, usually on a truck, shouting to ladies, bring out your rags (don't remember the words)

Scissors sharpener man with his cart (there is still someone here! -- every few YEARS)

burning autumn leaves in the street

Planning ahead with the Operator to make a long distance call

Coal furnace. Father goes down to the basement to stoke the FURNACE when we've all been out the whole day.

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ci_lantro

Grandma's old oak crank up wall hung telephone on a party line still in use until at least the early 1960's.

DSII & I were having a text conversation about various things including dogs. I used the word 'bowser' & he texted back, 'Mom, I don't know what a bowser is.' He's a smart kid w/ a couple of degrees, does creative writing so he's literate & fairly well read for a youngster...

Guess he was telling me, 'Mom, you're getting oooollllldddd!

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Indigo Rose

Bleusblue2-In my area the ragman just yelled, "Rags.....Rags...."as the beat up truck slowly went down the street. Then there was the Fuller brush man, and the garbage men who would go around into backyards, step on the ground level garbage container, remove the inner pail, hoist it up, carry to the truck, and return into into the ground.

That link above to the Ellen show was hilarious!

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pekemom

Bronzed baby shoes....common in the 50's. Usually with a picture frame, book ends or other item. Thought they were cool when I was a kid yet never did it with my three children's shoes in the 70's. Guess the trend had faded.

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bpath

Indigo, I had a row house with a sunken garbage can. Bad news for us, good news for raccoons! Even dirty diapers in the mix didn’t deter them. All us 11 homeowners kept our trash in the alley garage until trash day! THEN we dropped it into our sunken cans for the garbage man.

That row house also had a milk door. It was painted shut on the inside, but the outside was handy for holding my gardening gloves, weeder, and trowel.

Waiting for the phone rates to go down to call someone long distance.

When our son was 3 or 4 and we were teaching him his phone number, we made sure to include the 1 at the beginning, because you needed to include it then. When he was giving it to someone, he would say “1”, and wait for them to write it down. They didn’t, because it was understood. He’d insist on “1” before he would continue with the phone number.

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bragu_DSM 5

no masks

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Izzy Mn

Someone upstream mentioned chalkboard erasers. Sound of fingernails being dragged across chalk board. There always seemed to be one kid in class that would do that.


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wildchild2x2

Thomas Guides. Had one in every vehicle.

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Annie Deighnaugh

DH wanted to add savings bank book...he grew up in NYC and remembers the guys with horse-drawn wagons selling fruits and vegetables.

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bpath

Shorthand.

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Elizabeth

Alleyways behind your house. We had a simple two-track alley that was used for garbage collection and service people to use. We kids used them as shortcuts to out friend's houses. Often there were sheds facing the alley. One neighbor had a huge vegetable garden that edged along the alley. All the veggies within arms length went missing.

Eventually the alleys were no longer used and one person's backyard adjoined their neighbor's in the back.

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nickel_kg

Clocks on the wall -- analog, not digital. Thermometers hung outside the window so you can see what the temperature is. Hard copy calendars to note future appointments. Cameras that only take pictures, no other function. Things kids today (and me too, now) use cellphones for (well, mostly...!)

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wildchild2x2

Having to pass a Civics test in the 8th grade to move on to high school.

Mandatory homemaking for girls and shop class for boys in 7th and 8th grade.

Dress codes - Boys had to have their shirt tucked in and wear a belt. Girls had to wear skirts or dresses, even on cold winter days. No tee shirts.

Mimeograph in the school office for making copies.

In kindergarten the milk lady would come by with a little red wagon with individual cartons of milk and graham crackers. Kindergarten was only 3 hours but snacks and rest/nap time on floor mats were the norm. During rest period the teacher would either play records or read stories.

Lunch ladies cooked the cafeteria food onsite and a lot of it was really good.

Room mothers would bring home made goodies for celebrations and holidays.

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bpath

Wild child, in my elementary school, every classroom k-6, 2 classrooms per grade, had their daily milk person. In k-2, 2 kids. We'd go down to the kitchen, load the radio flyer with milk cartons, bring it back, roll it among the desks so everyone got their milk, and took the empty wagon back to the kitchen. Very exciting to be in the hall and, ooh, the little kitchen, with no adults around! We didn't have a cafeteria, kids who ate at school bright their own.

We had lots of jobs at school. Cleaning the blackboard at the end of the day and clapping out the erasers, washing the blackboard on Friday with a bucket of water and a rag, putting our chairs up on our desks at the end of the day so the janitor could sweep (but we also could not leave any pencils, tissues, paper scraps, nothing, on the floor). Before long weekends or vacations we moved all the furniture to the edges so the floor could be properly washed and waxed. The older kids were assigned to raise and lower the flag outside the school.

But, teachers ate their lunch in the classrooms with the dozen or so kids who stayed.

We had two recesses a day, plus an hour for lunch, in a 6-hour day. Starting in 4th grade we got one recess plus lunch. And yet, our generation created the internet and electric cars, so we used all that free time developing our creativity!

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chisue

The six-hour work day. This was an option up to 1945-46, and it was abolished over the wishes of most of the workers -- two-thirds at General Mills (for example), and especially female employees. This was when nations began to depend on consumer buying to float their economies. Mass advertising taught people to sacrifice leisure time, working longer hours to afford to buy nonessential 'stuff' that had to be replaced by the 'newest stuff'. Until then, only the upper classes were driven to compete with 'The Joneses'.

(I never knew about this turning point before yesterday, reading an essay on BBC America, taken from MIT. I've always wondered how we got into this rat race to consume landfill.)

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beesneeds

Been watching some old TV, and a couple things have come up that made me think of this thread.

Phones- when they were attached to the house and you had to pay local bills and extra for long distance charges. Physical phone booths being commonly found everywhere and used pocket change for a call.

Game show prizes, people got stuff from blenders to fur coats, cars to tea services, and more random stuff- and people were thrilled about it no matter what the prize was.

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sjerin

Intersting stuff, Chisue! Thanks for posting. I hope the pendulum is turning back the other way--many 30-somethings are eschewing "stuff" these days.

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bpath

Beesneeds, not only were phones hardwired, but you didn't own the phone. It was leased from the phone company. THE phone company, there was only one. And if you weren't home to answer it, you were out of luck. You'd never even know someone tried to call. And kids raced to answer the phone! My kids never answer the phone. Their own phones that are in their pockets.

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beesneeds

Oh my bpath, now that you mention it... I remember mom getting mad as hell once when we were kids because someone broke the phone and she had to go to the office downtown to get the replacement. I was too little to remember who broke it. But I remember going to the phone company office with her to get the new one- it was an interesting building of the time. She probably got mad at all of us at some time or another for long distance once we were all older, lol.

And leasing... leasing cable boxes, and by golly if every cable and remote battery wasn't packed in there, there would be fines to pay, and it was dropped off in person.

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bragu_DSM 5

an oral thermometer

encyclopedia

plat books

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paradiseprincess51

Pogo stick, Hula Hoop; Cat’s Cradle string game; Hop Scotch; skorts (pleated ultra mini skirt with attached bloomer panties); crinolines to “pouf out” a droopy skirt or dress); sparkly little girls’ plastic high heel shoes; “Tiger in the Tank” furry tails (always attached to your car’s radio antenna; large piece of formal-looking furniture housing your radio and record player with storage for records; washing machine with a wringer; hand crank meat grinder and a similar machine to peel apples (for Mom to make her own apple sauce); little girls’ patent leather shoes with ankle straps; saddle shoes (only for teenage girls); coupons in cereal boxes to redeem for dolls and stuffed animals; Tea bag boxes with animal, butterfly and bird cards (good for exchange); baseball card collections. No doubt some of these things are still around but I have happy memories of these things dating to the 1950’s and 60’s. Still remember my mother applying a thick coating of strong-smelling wax to strip her hair legs (yuck and ouch). Long distance phone calls were horrendously expensive (first 3 minutes was all my parents would permit for calls and after that the phone call was terminated. Next call would be many months later. Most news was shared on a flimsy airmail piece of stationary (cheapest way to mail a letter).

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chisue

A juke box -- some with selection boxes at your table at the teen hangout.

Knob on your steering wheel. (Something we've concluded on the KT were necessary only along with bench seating, so your boyfriend could still steer while he had his arm around you.)

Trading cards. Marbles.

I still have a mercury-filled oral thermometer. Did you every play with the mercury from a broken one? I did -- which is *why* they've been banned!

Glass drinking straws with a bend in them. Autoclaves for *reusable* medical instruments.

Wood venetian blinds.

Whirlagig clothes dryers.

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Raye Smith

Autoclaves are still in use in most hospitals. We had an asbestos glove for removing items from it!

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bpath

I still have a Mercury thermometer. I like it because the batteries never die! And yes, we played with the mercury back in the day. Who knew!

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Richard (Vero Beach, Florida)

A science teacher that allowed us to build Estes model rockets and send up mice.

That allowed us to "try" to make nitro while not quite allowing us to succeed.

That allowed us to bring hotdogs, etc. and cook in the back room, likely tricking us into thinking we weren't learning when we were.

That allowed us to hold a water drinking contest... not long before the long bus ride home.

That taught us to make black powder (charcoal, sulfur, saltpeter?) and back in those days a person could buy the ingredients at the local drug store without being put on a terrorist watch list.

That took us to watch/feel the Apollo 16 launch. And helped those of us who couldn't normally afford such a trip earn the money.

Getting by with skipping school the first day of squirrel season.

(And yes, I remember the feeling of mercury rolling around in my hand too.)

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Elizabeth

A two-seater outhouse

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jemdandy

I'll add a few more.

Sears and Roebuck catalog

Using a Sears and Roebuck catalog for toilet paper (in an outhouse).

Corn cobs soaking in kerosene in a can on the back porch used as a fire starter for the kitchen stove.

Kitchen matches (The last kitchen match made in the US was about 2 years ago.)

Blow torch

Bump starting a car engine. (It should have a manual transmission for this. This can be accomplished with a few automatics if the transmission has a rear oil pump. The vehicle has to be pushed fast enough for the oil pump to engage the transmission clutches tight enough to avoid slipping.)

Setting the output of a generator on a car engine by moving a control brush.

Fountain pen.

Dictionary.

Marchant calculators. These could extract square roots. This was accomplished by a series of subtractions while keeping count of the number of subtractions. It took several seconds to do this. It was using an oddity of the number system: Adding a series of odd numbers, starting with 1, returns the square of the number of odd numbers. Isn't that neat.

1 1

3 4 [1+3]

5 9 [4+5]

7 16 [7+9]

9 25 [9+16]


************

By the way, the proper lubricant for a slide rule is talcum powder or body powder. The object is to have the static friction as close as possible to dynamic friction to reduce a stick-slip action. When these two frictions are equal, the slide rule action becomes smooth. Slide rules made of bamboo usually do not require lubricants, and in my day, were more expensive.

Engineering slide-rules have vertical cursor lines on both sides of the rule. These are adjustable and should be checked for alignment before using the slide-rule. These two cursors must be aligned with each other, in other words, when the cursor on one side lies on its index, the other side must also be on its index line. The index line is at ends of the scale. The reason for this is there are calculations that use both sides of the device and will be in error if the two lines on the cursor glasses are not aligned.

A 10 inch slide-rule can only calculate to 3 places. Sometimes, it can do a 4th place if the answer lies between the 1 and 2 on the scale. A 20 inch slide-rule adds one more place. I have seen only one of these in my lifetime. It was a special issued by GM to some of its engineers in the 1950s.

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beesneeds

Kitchen matches must have had quite a stock made before they stopped making them... they are still commonly found in most grocery and hardware stores, and usually in the seasonal (grilling) section and often the camping goods sections of stores too.

Non mercury oral thermometers are common too- they were out of stock for a long time with the pandemic, but are getting back in stock in the stores now. And even thermometer covers to boot :)

Plat books are still a thing as well. In paper form at the office and a lot of places are putting plat maps on line in addition to keeping the books. Personal ownership isn't a thing, but government offices having them isn't uncommon.

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Michele

Mercurochrome. We were fascinated. Painting it on our open wounds.

Here’s a memory I had the other day. One block away from school, there was an old fashioned candy store. The old couple and their daughter were behind the display cases. You could go in with a quarter and come out with a small paper bag full of candy. Every kind of loose candy. The little waxy containers that looked like bottles with colored sugar water ( I guess), pixie sticks.... All sorts of penny candy.

That’s all they sold. They had a line of kids each and every day after school.

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