Asclepias incarnata

gracie01 zone5 SW of Chicago(5)

or Swamp Milkweed. This plant does very well for me and I would like more of it. Is it easy to grow from collected seeds? If so, when to sow? TIA


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terrilou

I find this milkweed easy to grow from seed. In January, I put seeds in a moist paper towel, seal in a ziplock bag and store in the refrigerator for a couple of months. In March or April, its time to plant the seeds into pots using a seed starting mix with a bit of potting soil added. Under the grow lights they go. They germinate quickly. Strong light is needed to keep them from getting leggy. When the temperatures are warm enough, I place them outside for a few days with shade to adjust & then plant them. You can also plant the seeds outside in the fall & they will sprout in the spring. These plants will lag a bit behind your early started ones. I germinate them inside to get a head start.

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gracie01 zone5 SW of Chicago(5)

Thank you for the detailed instructions terrilou!

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docmom_gw(5)

Gracie,

Terrilou’s instructions are perfect. But you could also try the winter sowing method. I have grown A. incarnata using that method for years with great success. The method involves planting seeds into milk jugs with drainage holes and planting medium during the winter. You then place the containers outside and let Mother Nature work her magic. That way, you avoid the refrigerator, indoor lights, and the hardening-off process. I have found the plants to be very hardy and with excellent root development, compared to seedlings grown indoors. I live just north of Chicago, so our climates are similar. Good luck, whichever method you try. A. incarnate are great plants.

Martha

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mxk3(Zone 5b SE MI)

Yep, it's easy to grow from seed, but be sure to cold stratify as mentioned above (the fridge trick works well).

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