Anyone use this for cleaning cast iron pan??

always1stepbehind

I saw this yesterday at Target. Wondering if anyone has any experience with it? A silicone scraper of some sort popped up when I googled cast iron scrapers. I sorta winged it and cleaned the pan with salt and a scrub brush and then did soap and water with the scrub brush dried it and put a little oil in the bottom.


https://www.target.com/p/lodge-chainmail-scrubber-red/-/A-53633018

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Debby

The only abrasive I use in my cast iron frying pans is salt. If the food is stuck on (it shouldn't be if it's seasoned good enough), I put a bit of water in the pan and heat it on the stove. Let it boil for a minute, then drain it. Pour some salt in the pan and using a bit of water and a sponge, I clean out the pan. Rinse off, then put back on a hot burner. Coat with a VERY thin coat of olive oil and heat until it smokes. Turn off stove and let it cool. Done.

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always1stepbehind

Debby, this was the first time using the pan. It's supposedly is pre-seasoned but there still was stuck on meat/juices.

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DawnInCal

I just use a nylon scrubby and hot water to clean mine. I never oil it after cleaning; it doesn't need it, but I know that a lot of people do. I've found that pre-seasoned doesn't always mean truly seasoned. Once you get your pan clean, season it by rubbing with oil, placing in 375 oven for one hour, letting it cool down in oven and wiping out the oil.

Once your pan is seasoned, be sure to pre-heat it before cooking on it. Cast iron doesn't work well if food is put in it when it's cold. We use our cast iron to prepare nearly every meal; well seasoned cast iron can be used for pretty much everything from over easy eggs to frying a steak to baking a cobbler.

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Elizabeth

My "pre-seasoned" pans were anything but. I had to start all over and season them correctly. Nothing stuck after that. When I wash them the water just rolls off and the pan looks completely dry.

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OutsidePlaying

No I have never used one, but I have seen them sold at the Lodge store in South Pittsburgh TN. I use coarse sea salt if I really need to clean mine good. Normal cleaning is just swish with a nylon scrubber or scraper and hot water. Sometimes a tiny little soap never hurts to cut the extra grease, as long as you dry well and follow up with a rub of vegetable oil after.

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loonlakelaborcamp

I just used mine tonight. They are fantastic and I haven't worn one out in 5 years. I love it because it has all different radius corners for cleaning out pans. I use it on pots and pans, cookie sheets, and also crusty casserole dishes.

You just use the flat edge to scrape off 95% of the crud, and use the curved corners or angled edges to clean the rims.

Get one, you won't regret it. They clean off easily--ever try to clean off a plastic scruby pad after scrubbing a lasagne pan?


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Michael

Scrub Daddy or Scrub Mommy, depending on the mess.

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bpath

I have one without the sponge inside, just chain mail. I love it. It cleans the pan easily, and I can toss the chain mail on the 3rd rack of the dishwasher.

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arkansas girl

I have never used one, but it looks interesting. I usually just use a scrub sponge or a brush, that's not very abrasive. If something is really stuck on, I use one of these: copper scrubby

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Alisande

That looks very cool--and Lodge should certainly know what they're doing. I just use stainless steel scrubbies from the dollar store when needed, but most of my cast iron is older and doesn't need much scrubbing.

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littlebug zone 5 Missouri

Always1, I was at Target today and saw this too! I thought it looked a bit drastic. And I never thought about using it on different kinds of cookware.

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loonlakelaborcamp

I'm sorry, but I was describing the lodge plastic scraper. The chain mail scrubber actually takes off my seasoning layer.

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matthias_lang

Lehman's sells the chain mail scrubbers without the sponge inside. They sell some other cast iron cleaning gadgets, including a resin "Skrapr."https://www.lehmans.com/product/chain-mail-scrubber/

https://www.lehmans.com/product/skrapr-cleaning-tools/

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katrina_ellen

Seems expensive to me, 20.00 for a scrubby. Not for me.

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matthias_lang

Just as a cast iron pan can be handed down through the generations, so could this chain mail scrubber. It would make sense though, to test one before buying, or to have the word of a trusted friend that it is really worth the money. If you are used to paying $1.98 for a scrubber and throwing it away to buy a fresh one, the $20 might seem too steep.

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Hot Rod

I have a chain mail "cloth" about the size of a regular dishcloth. I use it successfully on all of our cast iron.

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donna_loomis

I bought one without the sponge a few months ago to clean the only cast iron pan a have. Bought it on WISH for about $6. It does an awesome job. I have also found it works very well on my stainless steel and aluminum pans, if something has burned in them (DH does most of the cooking). And it will never wear out like other scrubbers do.

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Jamie

I just use a regular kitchen sponge with an abrasive side, usually. Most of the time I just use the sponge side.

Once, early on in our relationship, my better half used steel wool on one of my iron skillets. Hahahahaha that wasn’t a good day for me.

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