No berries on "Blue Muffin' viburnum

tomp123

I planted three ‘Blue Muffin’ viburnums (Viburnum dentatum) four years ago because I wanted berries for birds, but they have never produced any berries here in Pa. (Zone 6b). I planted them in front of a ‘Chicago Lustre’ viburnum (another cultivar of viburnum dentatum) because multiple sources said they would cross-pollinate. The Blue Muffins always are finished flowering by the time the Chicago Lustre flowers, however. Thus, no cross-pollination and no berries on the Blue Muffins. The two Chicago Lustre’s that I have in my yard both produce berries every year, however, and I’m puzzled as to what’s cross-pollinating with them. I have other native viburnums in my yard, but no other cultivars of dentatum. So does anyone have success with getting Blue Muffins to produce berries? What can I do to duplicate your success?

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WoodsTea 6a MO(6a)

I'm pretty sure the only berries I have had on my 'Blue Muffin' were because I hand pollinated a few blooms with some pollen I brushed from a V. dentatum 'Little Joe'. The two shrubs are separated enough physically, and the overlap in flowering is short enough, that it doesn't seem like insect pollinators are going to get it done most years.

It's possible that pollen from your Blue Muffins is still making it to your Chicago Lustres, even though the Blue Muffin flowers appear to be done.

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