Questions About Hobart KitchenAid Mixer

John Liu

I found a Kitchenaid mixer for $40 at a flea market, and am giving it to dear daughter for her first college apartment.

My mixer is an Electrolux DLX, so I know little about KA mixers. I've read they overheat easily and can't handle bread dough, but are good for light duty mixing. Of course those comments are by DLX devotees, so perhaps biased.

The labels on this one say: "Hobart, Kitchenaid Div, Troy, Ohio" "Max Watt 300" "K5SS" "Solid State". It is ivory colored, lift bowl, and, once cleaned up, looks virtually new. Works fine, as far as I can tell. It came with the bowl, whisk paddle, and plastic bowl lip. I need to get her a paddle for dough. Maybe a bread dough attachment too. There is no manual.

What should I tell her about using this appliance? What is the max load it can handle? Any tips?. How old do you think it is?

I see the current KA mixers are much more powerful, up to 575 watts.

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annie1992

I have an old Hobart/Kitchenaid and it has never overheated and handles bread dough easily, but it's older and so I can't say about the new ones. It was a gift from wizardnm/Nancy, and I think of her and smile whenever I use it, which is often. It plows its way through multi-batches of wedding cakes and Christmas cookies without a hiccup, I make divinity for my mother (something I've burned up two other mixers doing), and I even beat Ann T's maple fudge with it once. It's a workhorse.

I bought Ashley one that was also used and replaced the brushes in it, a 30 second job that cost me $8 for the brushes. She and Kevin use it almost daily, she bakes and he likes it for mixing up meatloaf/meatball mixtures, incorporates his own seasonings into sausage and makes the filling for lasagna.

Elery also had one before he met me, and he used it for bread regularly. His son now has it and uses it to make bread. So, the DLX people might indeed be a bit biased. I have heard, however, that the newer KA mixers aren't the machines the old Hobart mixers were.

I'd just tell her to have fun, I haven't hesitated to use mine for anything, including using the slicing attachment for 50 pounds of potatoes, fiddling with the pasta maker and using the meat grinder to grind a pig's worth of sausage.

Annie


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John Liu


Here is a picture. I've since removed all the discoloration and gunk.

SWMBO is slightly upset. She wants a KA mixer for herself, and has never liked my DLX. So I need to keep an eye out for a similar mixer for her.

I've also collected for dear daughter: one of my Cuisinart DLC7 food processors, a 18" x 24" x 1.5" thick cutting board, two 10" Sabatier knives (chef and slicer), a 7" santoku-style knife, a set of stones and a strop, a knife roll, and the disco-ball French hammered aluminum pot I posted about a while ago. She also has her Fagor MultiCooker. We'll see what cookware her roommates bring, before getting more pots and pans and etc.

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annie1992

John, that looks like mine, except mine is red. Ashley's is white. I hope she has as good luck with hers as I've had. She's got better stuff than I had when I was 50, LOL, but she probably also does more cooking than I did at her age. Heck, I spent the first 10 years of my adult life using one wooden handled hunting knife and a paring knife from the Dollar Store. Now, of course, I know better.... (grin)

Somehow, I doubt that the roommates are going to be adding much in the way of kitchen equipment.

Annie


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John Liu

It feels like such a quality machine! The only plastic on it must be the two knobs, and the power cord. Weighs about 40 lb!

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plllog

There may be a plastic failsafe gear in it too, like on sewing machines. Those are meant to fail when overstressed to protect the motor from worse damage.

Yes, it's a quality machine.

Even the new KitchenAid versions can do bread dough just fine. They just might not do as much at once. For kneading stiff doughs, however, dual hook machines have an advantage because they stretch out from the middle. The single large hook on the KA winds through the middle but there's no counterforce. KA gets the job done, but wouldn't be a top choice for stiff dough. OTOH, my challah dough is a soft, brioche style, and I can get three large loaves in the flip top Artisan (about a dozen years old), get all the flour in, and get it completely kneaded, easily. With the old fliptop Hobart I grew up with, which had a pint smaller bowl, the last few cups of flour made it too stiff for the hook, the dough climbed the hook, and we had to add the last of the flour and do the final kneading by hand. The base didn't grip as securely either. That old Hobart is still going, but I actually prefer my newer KA.

Lucky daughter. Great dad to be scouring the flea markets for treasures to outfit her with!

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Islay Corbel

It looks great. I hope you're going to help her move, though. All that weight to carry!

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chas045

That sounds like your best thrift store find ever. I believe that Hobart is the one everyone lusts after. However, like you said, you will need a regular paddle for standard mixing (not bread) AND a dough hook. You may need to call KA to determine which paddles/hooks will fit that machine. Unfortunately, they are not all the same with different bowl sizes and occasionally even shapes.

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Rusty

I think you got one heck of a good bargain! Mine looks almost exactly like that, except it doesn't have the 'Hobart' on it, it says Kitchenaid, St. Joseph, MI, USA. It's approx. 20 years old, model K5SS, max watts 325, doesn't have 'solid state' on it. It is metal and weighs a ton. It has been a real work horse, for several years I made up to 9 leaves of bread a week (sold at an arts & crafts co-op), using the KA exclusively for kneading the Oatmeal bread, and for the first kneading of the Sourdough bread. All bread was made in 3 loaf batches. I did burn out some gears once with my first (last and only) attempt at Divinity. That was probably about in the middle of the years of bread making. Had it repaired and continued with the bread making for several years after that. It's also mixed many MANY batches of cookies, more than I care to try to count. Along with all the normal day to day home uses of a mixer.

My guess would be that it can handle almost anything your daughter wants it to. And for $40.00, it's no great loss if it doesn't last for 20 years!

Rusty

Edited to add: I'm sure you are aware that you can probably get a manual online.

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cloudy_christine

I have a Hobart Kitchen Aid K5SS. I've had it since the '80's. It's a beautiful cobalt, darker than the later blue ones. It can do pretty much anything. I don't overload it when making bread (not much more than six cups of flour), but really the motor is great and it has never overheated. My one complaint: the bowl lift model is not made to be adjustable. You have to be careful you don't end up with a tiny puddle of unbeaten egg white underneath the foam. What a find for $40!

I recommend getting a second bowl. It's so useful to have a clean bowl for egg whites after mixing batter in the first bowl. I have a second whisk too.

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chas045

c_c: As far as I can tell, I found the appropriate manual for the K5SS. It says that there is a bowl adjustment that is in the head mount up behind the bowl. The picture suggests that it might be set in at an angle.I hope this link shows something

It is the lower pic for the 5 qt.

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cloudy_christine

Thank you, chas045. The old ones do not have that screw, though. The whole lift mechanism seems to be different. KitchenAid used to have a forum, apparently gone now, and I asked about it there.

Isn't it annoying when products change but keep the same model number?

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OklaMoni

I have the same model. As far as I can remember there is a limit for flour, when making bread. It was either 7, or 8 cups. Sorry, I am really to lazy to get up, and look, if I can find the manual.


Moni

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John Liu

Do you KA users recommend:

- The standard mixing paddle, or the kind with a rubber scraper on one or both edges?

- The "C" shaped dough hook, or the "spiral" aka "pig tail" shaped hook?

Assuming they fit - I'll check that for whatever I get.



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plllog

I've tried the scraper paddles, thinking that it would solve that whole start/stop problem, but I haven't found one that works well, and more are designed for my model than any other. It's really only cake and cookie batter that really make you want one. The trick to the standard paddle is the height adjustment. There is surely one on yours even if it's in a different place. If you can get a coated paddle (current stlye) that fits your machine correctly, that's a boon. The batter/dough falls off it easily, while the metal paddles grab it more.

The C shaped hook is better for soft doughs, where you're adding flour while you're kneading. It pulls in the sides. The pig tail is more like what the double hook ones that do better for stiff doughs, like pizza, and cuts through the middle better. Over time--get both!

The mixers are designed to have interchangeable attachments. There are some that are for this or that model only, but you should still be able to get the correct ones, easily. Also check e-Bay. :)

BTW, the old tilt head Hobart also had a 7 cup limit on the flour. Interesting that it's not so different for the lift bowl.

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ann_t

Same colour as mine and I've had mine for 36 years. And I've never had a problem with it over heating and I did many a batch of bread dough in it over the years. I stopped using it for bread when I bought the Electrolux Magic Mill DLX in the early 90s.

If my Hobart KA broke I would be looking to buy another of the same age before buying one of the newer models.

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annie1992

Ann T, I'm glad to "see" you again, I was becoming concerned.

Annie

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cloudy_christine

John, I find that the Beater Blade scrapes too closely but I use it anyway. When I got it there wasn't one for the bowl-lift models. I see now there is one, but really it must depend on the exact clearance. I know KA was warning that it could void the warranty, but that won't be a concern for mine from the eighties! The Beater Blade makes a godawful sound in my bowl, which does diminish the pleasure of using the machine, but I put up with it. Certainly it's not necessary. If you are getting only one paddle beater, I'd say that should not be it.

I have the C-shaped dough hook that came with the machine. I start the dough with the paddle, since it works better than the hook for the initial mixing of liquid and dry ingredients.

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dcarch7 d c f l a s h 7 @ y a h o o . c o m

“------------The labels on this one say: "Hobart,
Kitchenaid Div, Troy,
Ohio"
"Max Watt 300" "K5SS" "Solid
State".
It is ivory colored, --------------------I
see the current KA mixers are much more powerful, up to 575 watts.-------“

Well, I don’t know what they mean by solid
state. I don’t think it has solid state PWM speed control. PWM speed control
works well. It gives you high torque at low speed. Older motor speed controls
are just done by wiring the rotor/ field coils differently, which gives no
power at slow speed.

Wattage rating for a motor is tricky. Manufacturers
play with those numbers to fool the public.

300 watts can give you a lot of power,
depending on how they gear down the motor.

“Plastic gears are to protect the motor” is a
joke. Most drills come with adjustable clutches, which can protect the motor.
That’s what they should have done to protect the motor, or a simple re-set overheat
button. Plastic gears’ main reasons are to reduce noise, save manufacturing
cost and reduce weight, all three factors which concern buyers.

“--I found a Kitchenaid mixer for $40 at a flea
market---“

Great buy! I would spend an hour opening up the
machine and repack the gear box with engine grease, and replace the carbon brushes. The machine will
last long enough for your grand children.

dcarch

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plllog

Actually, I don't think it's overheating that the failsafe gear is supposed to protect a motor from. I don't know how to describe it, but it's more like keeping all the other parts from going awry. It has been explained thoroughly to me, viz-a-viz the sewing machines, but I can't repeat it. I heard that they replaced the nylon gear with a metal one that's also designed to fail under such circumstances, so they could claim "all metal parts". I don't know if mixers have those or not, as I said above.

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OklaMoni

John, I only have the original tools that came with mine. I once replaced the main paddle, you know, the one to make cakes and cookie dough. I have the C shaped dough hook. I am very satisfied with it.


Moni

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annie1992

Both mine and Elery's also have the C shaped dough hook, as well as the wire blade for whipping egg whites, etc and a flat beater/paddle. I haven't tried the fancy paddles with rubber blades, but Chrystal had one and threw it away, so I kept my money!

Annie

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Rusty

I have just the paddles that were in the original package, the regular beater paddle for most 'normal' uses, the wire whip, and the C dough hook. I'm completely satisfied with the way all 3 work. I've wanted one of the blades with the rubber scraper, but never have invested in one. I've also lusted after some of the other attachments, specifically the pasta attachment and the meat grinder. But I've never found them in any thrift shops or garage sales, and I don't feel paying full price for them new is an option for me.

Needless to say, this post and the recent one about Lars' new pasta attachment has me drooling. Again. (Big grin)

Rusty

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plllog

I have the meat grinder. (It was a present!) It's excellent for small amounts, but very fiddly. I don't grind a lot of stuff, so it's perfect for me.

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John Liu

dcarch - so automotive synthetic bearing grease will work? I use that for my bicycles and have a tub of it.

Repair parts for this mixer look pretty inexpensive. Brushes are $3, the so-called "worm gear" is $4, the entire tower gear assembly that the worm gear fits in is $8.

This mixer appears to have been used very little. There are practically no nicks or scrapes on the paint, or other signs of wear. However, the power cord looks like a replacement. I'm guessing the mixer was sidelined by damage to the cord and then not used for a long time.

i'm going to get the paddle and hook, and when we get home, daughter and I will do a mix-off, comparing this KA to my DLX.


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Ti Canton

Hi,


I saw some K5SS kitchen aids on Craigslist/eBay. They are listed as Heavy Duty, 325 Watt, Solid State Speed Control, Kitchen Aid. DIDNOT LIST Hobart name at all. I am confused. Were these not made by Hobart?


I also have Artisan 325 watt, bought in 2009. So far mine is still working, but the last time I used it with the flat beat to beat about 1 lb of a half meat frozen over 5 minutes. Mine KA’s head was warm when I touched it. I immediately stop it. Wait until 30 minutes to use it again. I didn’t have problem to beat it. However, I only used briefly, stoped, used it again.


Should I try to save money and invest in a new model of Kitchen Aid Pro 600? Or I should get the K5SS with the Hobart name on the model? My friend is thinking to get the Delonghi mixer DMS 800 via eBay. What do you think Delonghi DMS 800 versus K5SS? Because the DMS has 800 watt while the K5SS has 325 watt. I know KA parts are easy to get and cheaper while the DMS parts come from England are harder to get and expensive due to Euro and shipping fee.


Thank you

Ti

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plllog

Unlike some other message boards, people here don't look in much at old threads because they figure new messages are spam. You're very welcome to start a new thread of your own. We don't have thread police. You'll probably get a lot more answers. Additionally, you can choose to have one thread show both here in Cooking and also in Appliances, which might be useful.

My opinion, and it's opinion only, is that while the old Hobarts were superior machines, they're only good buys if you know how to recondition and service them well (or want to learn and know where to get help). Second hand on new-ish ones from someone whose habits you know and approve of is fine. Or barely used in the box with all its accessories. Otherwise, you're taking on someone else's problems.

You might also get a good deal, with a warranty on "scratch and dent", open box, display models, etc. Just don't go for a "demonstrator", which will likely have heavy use.

If you frequently have uses that require a heavier duty mixer than your Artisan, getting a stronger mixer makes sense. I can't figure out from your post whether it was the meat that was partly frozen or if the mixer froze while mixing the meat. The Artisan is great for normal baking chores, including lighter breads, but it's not quite there for heavier breads without reducing the batch or other compromises. The meat might just be too much for the model, especially if there wasn't much liquid in the mix. I don't like to use the mixer for meat anyway. It gets too dense from that much handling, so I go old fashioned, put on food handling disposable gloves, and use my hands (I wonder if there's a better way to mix the meat than with the flat paddle?).

I can't advise you about models. Do consider starting your own thread.

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sheilajoyce_gw

DH surprised me with a KA mixer that looks like your picture back in 1974. It came with a dough hook, a metal "paddle" and a large balloon type whisk paddle. I think that it cost well over $200 if not over $250. I bought another bowl for doing egg whites. I have never had any problems with it other than the time I tripled a yeast bread recipe. It is so heavy that I don't use it much these days since I store it on the floor of the pantry. It will soon go home with my older son, who loves to cook.

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jerzeegirl

I have an old Hobart inherited from my mother that has never given me trouble. It is a sturdy work horse and have never once broken down. I admit readily that I have a sentimental attachment to the machine. The only time I had trouble with it is when some dough got caught in the area where the attachment fits into the machine and I could not for the life of me get the attachment to come out. Finally, it did.

That said, if I had to buy it all over again, I would definitely get a brand spanking new KA in bright red! The Hobart is just too dang heavy. It sits on my counter all the time because I knew I would have trouble lifting it into a cupboard. I think I would get a tilt head model next time since pulling the lever on the Hobart to lift the bowl is very difficult (perhaps because of the heaviness of the machine or maybe because the handle needs to be serviced). Lastly, I have been unable to find a small appliance dealer in my area to service it. It would cost a fortune to send it to KA to have it serviced because of its inordinate weight (and I don't even know if they would service it).

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provogal

I just sold my pro kitchen aid for that reason - too heavy and no tilt head which meant the beater always had to go back into the batter to get it off. So, I treated myself to a Kitchen Aide Artisan tilt head in cinnamon (not too bright a red) to match my the backsplash in my soon to be new kitchen - we’re moving in September.


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Louiseab Ibbotson

I have the KA Artisan model. My original paddle attachment went missing a while ago, so I bought a new one from Amazon. I’m really pleased with it has the rubber scraper on the one side. I’m still happy with the dough hook. But I did have to replace the whisk attachment as it somehow got bent and I couldn’t fix it. I have the meat grinder attachment as well and I really like it. I would like to have a second bowl though. I was making a dessert that had beaten egg whites and then had to rinse out the bowl to make the rest of the mixture.

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provogal

Louiseab, you can buy extra bowls at Canadian Tire - if you’re in Canada.

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Louiseab Ibbotson

Thanks provogal, I am in Canada and will certainly check it out.

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