invitation wording?

ginloucro

We are eloping to Maui to get married by ourselves (but everyone knows about it). We were not planning on having any sort of reception, but my mom wants to throw us one. We have a few relatives out of state we would like to invite so that we do not hurt their feelings. We would be thrilled if they decided to come but we do not want to make them feel obligated to come. Is there a tactful way of wording the invitation so that we make them feel welcome but not obligated?

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joann23456

No, I don't think there is. You just invite them, using whatever form of invitation you're using for everyone else (anything from email, letter or a telephone call for an informal reception to an engraved invitation for something more formal), and let them decide whether they'll attend. (Just make sure that the invitations aren't to a wedding reception, because this isn't one. It's a reception in honor of a newly-married couple, which is a time-honored tradition.)

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gellchom

joann is exactly right. People understand that an invitation is just that: an invitation, not a subpoena. If you say anything at all along the lines you are contemplating, it will sound like you are inviting them because YOU feel obligated to do so, but you really don't want them to come.

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