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gandbb

Any help for fibromyalgia pain

gandbb
17 years ago

I know that we are all sick and tired of being sick and tired, but really is there no help at all? I can't sleep for the pain and it is hard to enjoy any daytime activities. My doctor just kept telling me to take more and more and more ibuprofen until my stomach rebelled and I can't do it anymore. No loss, it didn't work anyway. I hate even asking about it. I just get the fish eye doctors reserve for malingerers and whiners. Should I see a rheumatologist? Is there anything that they can do?

Comments (40)

  • sunflowerrose
    17 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    You may want to look into Lyme disiese forum on the web and get ypurself tested for it. It is not a easy disiese to find, but one of my friend has it .

  • lazy_gardens
    17 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Several diseases cause that sort of pain, including Lyme disease. Some of the rickettsia and their relatives (can be cured by antibiotics) would have to be ruled out too.

    Question: How long have you had it, and what, if anything, has the doctor done to diagnose it?

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  • gandbb
    Original Author
    17 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I have had this for over 30 years. My doctors have poked their index finger into various places on my arms, back and legs and asked me "Does this hurt?" Then they tell me to take ibuprofen. Now that I am diabetic, the doctor is happier because he has something "real" to work on. I get very little sleep due to pain and it was suggested I take a glass of wine before bed. Oh yeah, that cured everything!

  • lazy_gardens
    17 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    There are a number of OTC and herbal remedies that help some people, some of them a lot, some a little, and some not at all. To my knowledge, none of them will affect diabetes treatment.

    1. Guiafesin (spelling approximate, it's a common cold remedy that you may be able to find separately as tablets.) May provide temporary relief for sleeping.

    2. Echinacea, taken constantly, may reduce the inflammation over time.

  • Marian_2
    17 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I suffered with Fibromyalgia Syndrome for probably 40 years . It was so bad for a few years that nights were absolute agony . Only those who have , or have had this , can understand the pain . I would be just sitting at a table working a jigsaw puzzle and the pain would wash over me from head to toe . Very few Doctors fully understand it . ( There is no test for pain ! ) .
    I tried Echinacea . I suffered a severe reaction to the second jar of pills . They made me vomit violently . Maybe they were contaminated ??
    Ultram was the only thing I found that would help , but the side effects were accumulating , so I quit taking it .
    About 3 years ago it suddenly got better . I can attribute it to nothing I did . The only differance was that I had had surgery for a double prolapse and a herniated intestine . I am sure the improvement in the FMS had nothing to do with the surgery .
    Now my main problem is fatigue and occasional 'brain fog' .
    I can certainly empathize with "being sick and tired of being sick and tired " !
    I have several friends who suffer from this affliction , no two are identical , but all are constantly ailing .
    I wish I could give you a tip on a 'magic' cure . but I'm afraid there is none . You learn to live with it , but it is definitely not easy . Hang in there . Take care of your self as much as you can , espacially by not overdoing any type of work , or being involved in stressful situations ( easier said than done ! ) .

    My main encouragement is ... there may be spontaneous relief somewhere in the future .

    Is there a support group in your area ?

    I need to add ... we who have this are very sensitive to so many things .... meds , noises , smells etc.
    It is not an easy life , but we need understanding , not criticism . I find it best to avoid those who are insensitive to my constant inability to live as others do .
    I do what I can do , and what I can't do is none of their business !

    Marian

  • gmom74
    17 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    From an article at Medscape . I printed this to take to my rheumatologist because I think I have fibromiagia. You may be able to find the entire article by typing in 'Medscape' and registering.

    Benefit of Ribose in a Patient With Fibromyalgia
    Posted 01/07/2005
    Benjamin Gebhart, Pharm.D.; James A. Jorgenson, M.S., FASHP
    Abstract and Introduction
    Abstract
    Ribose was added to the existing treatment regimen of a woman with fibromyalgia, resulting in a decrease in symptoms. It has been postulated that patients with fibromyalgia may have an alteration in muscle adenine nucleotide metabolism, leading to depleted energy reserves and an imbalance in cellular adenosine-triphosphate:adenosine 5'-diphosphate:adenosine 5'-monophosphate (ATP:ADP:AMP) ratios with an abnormal energy charge. As a key component in adenine nucleotide synthesis, ribose supplementation may be useful in such patients.

    Introduction
    Fibromyalgia is a syndrome that is manifested by generalized muscle pain and additional systemic symptoms of fatigue, tenderness and stiffness in multiple joints, sleep disturbance, and alterations in bowel activity. The specific etiology is unknown; however, changes in muscle histology, energy metabolism, oxygen utilization, and the neuroendocrine stress-response system have been postulated to play a role in the development and persistence of this disorder.[1] Low levels of muscle adenine nucleotides, reflected in depleted energy reserves and an imbalance in cellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate:adenosine 5'-diphosphate:adenosine 5'-monophosphate (ATP:ADP:AMP) ratios with an abnormal energy charge, have been reported.[2-4] The unknown cause and varying presenting symptoms make fibromyalgia a therapeutic challenge for practitioners.[5-7]

    The management of patients with fibromyalgia requires the integration of both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic approaches. Pharmacologic options have included tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin receptor antagonists, analgesics, benzodiazepines, antiinflammatory agents, and corticosteroids.[5, 6, 8] Routine daily exercise programs, dietary modifications, alternative therapies such as biofeedback and hypnotherapy, and nutraceuticals such as S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe) have also been explored.[9] Unfortunately, less than 50% of patients achieve any meaningful relief of their symptoms with use of those therapies.[5]

    We describe the case of a patient with fibromyalgia who had symptomatic relief when ribose was added to her existing treatment regimen. There have been anecdotal reports on the benefits of ribose in patients with fibromyalgia in whom conventional therapies have failed; however, to our knowledge, this is the first published case of use of ribose for this syndrome.



    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Section 1 of 4 Next Page: Case Report

  • alisande
    17 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I've had fibromyalgia for almost 20 years. I've found there's a huge emotional component in the illness; that is, emotional stress makes the symptoms dramatically worse. In addition, I think food is a factor. I first realized this when I was having extensive dental work and as a result was able to eat only a few things. During that period my pain was MUCH better. I've since identified some of the foods that cause problems. For me, these include the nightshades (peppers, tomatoes, potatoes, eggplant).

    If I'm having a flare, the #1 best thing I can do for myself is to lie down with a progressive relaxation tape or CD. Learning to breathe abdominally was a great benefit to me, and 15 minutes of deep breathing and relaxing my muscles gets wonderful results.

    I'll post a link below to ImmuneSupport's fibromyalgia support site. It might be helpful to you, although I've noted a lot of emphasis on pain meds.

    Here is a link that might be useful: ImmuneSupport's FMS/CFS support group

  • enchantedplace
    17 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I agree with Alisande. Rest and relief from stress are essential. Some stress is unavoidable but we need to focus on stress reduction and physical limitatiion. Stress affects the immune system resulting in low energy. Over doing physical limitation weakens nerves and tendons causing the pressure point pain, stiffness, and lack of coorination that many of us experience. I also agree on a healty balanced diet, elimination of junk food, and appropriate exercise. EP

  • lazy_gardens
    17 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    JUST IN!

    Some recent reports are that the common cough suppressant dextromethorphan may help relieve the symptoms. Ask your doctor.

  • gandbb
    Original Author
    17 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Interesting - and thank you to all who responded. Most of my attention lately has been on diabetes. I find I have to exercise to keep my sugars down but it is really hard to fight through the pain of fibromyalgia to do so. Not being able to get enough sleep seems to negatively effect my blood sugar as well.

  • Pawprint
    17 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    While at my chiropractor I saw a pamphlet on fibromyalgia. I read this because a friend of mine told me to ask him what if anything he could do. Turns out chiropractic care can help. It also said massage therapy to help the trigger points and physical therapy also can help.

    Im not sure if youÂve tried any of these. I personally do not suffer from this, (just a bad back) but I thought I would offer what I read today.
    Good luck!

  • daylilyfan
    17 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    gandbb
    there is a lot that can be done.... but you will have to find a doc that's willing to try various things until you find the magic combo that works for you - and then that combo will change from time to time as you go in and out of "flares".
    For instance, right now, I take cymbalta, flexeril and topomax to manage my pain day to day. When it's not enough, I take perscription strength aleve ( I cannot tolerate celebrex, motrin, artritec, bextra etc - only aleve). If that doesn't help after 12 hours, I add ultram. Ultram gives me a headache, so I add tylenol (which makes it "ultracet) And, last - if all that doesn't work, I have vicodin - but I only use it as a last resort, and only if I cannot sleep.

    Most people take something at night to help keep you asleep. For me, I take flexeril, as I tolerate it well. My prescription is for up to 5 at bedtime. If I am doing well, I take one or two, and up the dose the worse I feel.

    In addition to this, I eat no sugar, no caffeine.... very few refined things - try to eat lots of fruits and veggies and low fat.

    Also, I go to a massage therapist when things are really really bad - be sure to go to one with lots of training in fibro.... I went to one who did not when I didn't know better, and it caused a BAD flare that lasted 2 months.

    I go to a family Dr. who is interested in fibro, but many don't believe in it. I am also evaluated by a Pain Mgmt Dr. and a Rheumatoligist (sp?) once a year.

    Most important thing is find a Dr. who believes in it. Keep searching till you find one. It's the most important thing. You won't believe how much better you will be with just a few more hours of restful sleep a night when you get on the right meds, and the right diet.

  • Erin24
    17 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I have had fibromyalgia for 6 years. I was diagnosed by a rheumatologist -- he was helpful as far as diagnosing it went, but not much else. The only other option they offered me was sleeping and pain pills, neither of which I wanted to start relying on. I have been relentless in finding something to help, because I can't continue to live like this. I know many people swear by very restrictive diets, but I have young kids and enjoy cooking and didn't want to go that route unless absolutely necessary. I went to see a talk by Dr Jacob Teitelbaum (MD) a few years ago and felt optomistic for the first time. I started taking Enzymatic Therapy Daily Energy Enfusion and Enzymatic Therapy Fatigued to Fantastic Daily Energy B Complex and about a month after taking it I started feeling somewhat human again. (In my area, these are available at Vitamin Cottage and Wild Oats) I don't take the full scoop of Daily Energy Enfusion because it upset my stomach, I only took 1/2 scoop. For a practioner who may be more familiar with fibro in your area, look up Dr. Jacob Teitelbaum's web site, he has a list of practioners familiar with his protocol. Get your thyroid checked, and don't stop if your levels check out ok, because it could still not be functioning properly. Look into Dr. John Lowe's book, The Metobolic Treatment of Fibromyalgia. I've been told by my dr that the things that come up again and again in fibro studies are not enough magnesium or omega 3 fatty acids. I just recently started taking a different supplement, it's called Full Spectrum, by Himalayan Labs, and Fish Oil, which should meet both of those requirements. Good luck -- it's hard to stay positive when you're in pain, not sleeping, and so so fatigued all the time -- but there is help available, and we need to continue to educate each other with what we find.

  • caseyb
    17 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Interesting what Alisande mentions - those are the foods that my mother avoids for MS. Also known to affect people with arthritis and rheum... tobacco is also a member of the deadly nightshade family along with the peppers, potatoes, tomatoes and eggplant.

    I have been studying yoga instruction for a couple of years now, and I have heard several times about people with fibromyalgia seeking and finding relief in yoga or other stretching/strengthening/stress-relieving practices (tai chi, chi gong, maybe even pilates?).

    I have also heard quite a bit about the connection between sleep disorders/poor sleep and both diabetes/weight gain and pain. You might want to explore this avenue as well. Of course, a physical practice such as above might help with that also. I definitely notice a big difference in my sleep between when I'm practicing regularly and when I'm not.

  • daylilyfan
    17 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Go to the website Alisande mentions, join it, and read it. Do searches. You can learn more there than anywhere, including Drs. I've taken what I learn there to my family Dr. for things to try. I went for over 30 years grinning and bearing it, and finally decided enough was enough. I found a family Dr. who helped, then she moved back to her home town, and I looked till I found another who would help. I found a good Rheumy. I kept trying until we have finally got a combination that is pretty good.

    The key for me was getting a few hours sleep without waking up. After I was getting 5 hours sleep a night I felt much better. Most of my life I would sleep a couple hours and have to get up and move around, then lay back down and sleep a couple more hours.

    There are a LOT of folks that have this, and the drug companies stand to make a lot of money if they find something to help us, so there is a lot of research going on.

    You have to be willing to stick with it until you get the help you need. After all, you deserve it.

    Don't give up.

  • zenpotter
    17 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I too have fibromyalgia. Last winter I was fortunate to get into a program for chronic pain at a local hospital. They use a variety of methods none of them are medication. Relaxation tapes, meditation, stretching exercises, other mild exercises, acupressure and acupunture, healing touch, managing stress, and emotional therapy. I have been amazed with the results. No I am not cured but I can manage the pain much better now.

    I live in Minnesota and I am dreading the winter. The cold is not a friend of mine.

  • dpinker1
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I was glad to find this thread. I started with fibromyalgia in March. I have been to chiroprators and through physical therapy which just didn't help at all. Finally a month ago I was sent to a pain management specialist. I am now on celebrex, Gabapentin, Cymbalta and Hydro if the pain is severe. I am amazed that the combination and helped and I can finally sleep through the night. I get very tired and couldn't possibly work. Have applied for disablity which you know takes forever. I don't stay out, walk malls for my feet hurt too much and have changed my life. Finding the right specialist is an important key. Best of luck and please let me know how you progress. Many people do not understand this and think because we look fine we are. There are some nights I'm ready for bed at 5:00 and just can't stay awake but most are okay. I have found hobbies that help to keep me occupied.

  • buyorsell888
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I have Fibromyalgia and have not had medications help at all. Certainly not ibuprofen. I have Interstitital Cystitis, Vulvodynia and Irritable Bowel Syndrome too which are all common with those who have Fibro.

    I bought a hot tub. The soaking and jets are very soothing although temporary.

    I tried massage and chiropractic but both were too "rough" for me. They made my pain much worse. The key is to find practitioners who are experienced in Fibro and to not overdo anything. Swimming is good exercise for Fibro but even gentle walking and arm and leg lifts are easy to overdo at first too.

    Something that recently came to my attention, my father was diagnosed with Sleep Apnea after complaining of unrestorative sleep and over all aches and pains, fatigue and lack of motivation and my stepmother said he was having some mental symptoms too. Sounds just like Fibromyalgia but his doctor sent him to a sleep center since he is a man who snores and he had severe apnea. The Cpap machine has been a miracle. I'm going to try to get myself to a sleep center because I snore too and wake up all night long. I may not have Sleep Apnea but it is worth a try since the symptoms are soooo similar to Fibro.

    Best wishes to all who have Fibromyalgia, it is miserable and people think you are a hypochondriac.

  • Janis_G
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Fibromyalgia is a nightmare for those who have it.
    Having medical professionals roll their eyes and ignore it
    doesn't help.

    I found this link and thought I would share it.

    There are support groups out there for those who need them.

  • sherrykins_gmail_com
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Hi everyone,
    Has anyone tried using a T.E.N.S. (Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation) unit to manage their pain? I have low back pain and it seems to be the best treatment for me. Check out this link for further help with your condition, a T.E.N.S. unit will give you lots of relief. What are TENS Units?.

  • khandi
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    My sister-in-law tried that several years ago. It didn't help her at all!

  • mboston_gw
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Aneighbor of mine has it and she finally found a Holistic doctor that feels she is lacking an enzyme that allows her to digest and absorb her food and that she has been esentially mal nourished for quite some time. he put her on something - not sure what that helps with this and she is feeling much better, not completely over night great but significantly better. She says the fatigue has lessen and she is able to sleep better. The doctor evidently sees this in patients that have been diagnosed with Fibromyalgia.

  • flowergirl70ks
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I do not have this thank goodness, but my grandaughter does. She has gone to an all raw food diet and I never hear her complain about her pain anymore. She even got brave enough to get pregnant and has a 2 year old. It's probably been 5 years since she went to all raw food. Some Dr. in Oregon told her to try it and it works for her so maybe some of you would like to try it, it certainly can't hurt. Also thought I would mention that I think Ultram is a narcotic. I was prescribed this for back pain and take the generic Tramadol. I can see that I could easily get hooked on it.

  • devorah
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    An all raw food diet would preclude grains and I think that is a huge piece of the puzzle.

    I am taking Flexeril now and that helps a lot. I am also working out daily at a gym and that helps too though my muscles do get awfully sore and I have to massage flexeril ointment into the muscles.

  • lynne_melb
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Gandbb,
    Yes, please try a rheumatologist. My friend got the most relief from taking some pills that help improve the quality of your sleep.

    Good luck.

  • ARUM
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    gandb. I'm sorry you feel so poorly, and it seems that all people can do is take pills, which cause other problems. I am involved in a new technique to relieve pain, If you email me I will discuss it with you. I'm almost positive it will help you. :) Arum

  • grammieof5
    13 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I found this doctor in my searching yesterday. I like what he says in his approach to fibro. He has fibro too.This is his website http://www.4fibromyalgia.com/
    I am going to call & have a phone consult with him & if necessary go to see him. He is in Ormond Beach, Fl.
    I have been diagonosed with fibro 25+ years. I hate taking pills. Right now I take Cymbalta, Trazedone for sleep & Synthroid. I do warm water aerobics which I think helps a lot, but the key is warm water. It is 88 degrees.
    I think that the main factors that affect fibro are stress & diet. Both are difficult for me to manage. After a crazy fall & christmas I am in a terrible flare.

  • devorah
    13 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I've sort of gone off the grid I guess. My GP suggested I take Lyrica for pain so that I could sleep. I hated the weight gain that goes with that and also was afraid of becoming addicted - SO, I take it only on those nights when the pain is ferocious. My doctor doesn't know, but I am thinking of coming clean about my intermittant use. Hmmm, maybe, maybe not

  • grammieof5
    13 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I was prescribed Lyrica and after filling the script & reading all the side effects I only took 1 pill and have not taken anymore. The trazedone is a 50 mg pill for sleep. I cut it in 1/2 & have a wonderful night of sleep and wake up refreshed...not hung over. I highly recommend it. I have taken it for years. I do not think that I am addicted. I can still sleep without it, but not nearly as deep and restorative sleep. No side effects like weight gain at all!

  • kate75
    13 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I've heard that the pain is from toxins in the body - try a colon cleans...Hope it helps!

  • mommyandme
    13 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Hi! I'm new to this forum, but not new to GardenWeb. I was diagnosed with fibro a couple of years ago. It came on suddenly and fortunately the doctor (internal medicine) I was seeing knew exactly what was going on & diagnosed me immediately. He put me on a daily doses of 60 mg cymbalta and 10 mg flexeril. We tried lower doses of flexeril, but I have to have 10 mg. I am not ever pain free or spasm free, but I feel so much better most of the time. When I have a flare up, I can take an additional 30 mg cymbalta. I can also take more flexeril, 10 mg every 4 hours. When I need to pull out the big guns, I have darvocet. I had to move from CT to TX for various reasons. I am now living with my oldest daughter & her family. I cook my own meals (more on that later), clean my room & do my laundry. Sometimes I do more, but what's really nice is that I don't have to. That really relieves a lot of stress. At this point, I'm walking about 30 minutes a day, but I believe I can gradually do a little more. In CT, the terrain is so "rolling"; there are no really flat places to walk. I found every uphill & downhill, no matter how slight, was very, very hard on my legs. Here, it is so flat, I'm not stressing my legs so much. I'm going to be very careful though, about lengthening my walk because I know it doesn't take much stress to start a flair. Here In TX, I've found a new doctor. He's a rheumatologist. He was very unhappy with the medical records I brought with me. It appears, from studying the lab work, that my other doctor was letting some things slide. Also, because he was Internal Medicine and not rheumatology, he was not as knowledgable about joint problems. This new doctor says that, in addition to fibromyalgia, I'm suffering from bursitis, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Also, osteoporosis. He gave me 2 shots for the bursitis in the shoulders, which helped a lot. I'm taking plaquenil, an anti-inflamatory. Also, I'm now on Boniva. He also says my blood sugar & cholesterol are way out of whack. For these he wants me on the Zone diet & he also has me taking 16,000 mg of fish oil per day. From what I understand, it's a huge dose. I've been trying to follow the new plan for about 2 weeks now. So far, so good. I'm beginning to understand that Fibromyalgia affects us in many more ways than I originally thought. It appears that many of us have many other things going on in our bodies at the same time. Are these other problems caused by fibromyalgia ? Or are they caused by the "something else" that caused the fibromyalgia ? Two main points here: (1) some of our pain may very well be caused by something else other than fibromyalgia (2)I suggest that those who are willing and able to make dietary changes take a look at the Zone diet. I feel it's worth trying. Thanks to all here. This has been a good discussion & I hope we can keep it going. I will eventually report back on how this new plan works out for me.

  • devorah
    13 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Nearly everyone I know with fibromyalgia is sensitive to gluten. Most of us show considerable improvement on a gluten free diet. Most people also have problems with dairy. I think the zone diet is a good one, but it has to be modified to exclude wheat and probably dairy.

    I thought flexeril was a wonder drug. I too take 10mg, but it is losing its effectiveness for me and I am resorting to taking Lyrica as I mentioned above. The people I know who have taken Lyrica for quite a while find it too loses its effectiveness and of course, they hate the weight gain. I took gabepentin, but at such a low dose, even the pharmacist was surprised so it is little wonder that it did nothing for me. I need to see my rheumatologist again.

  • mommyandme
    13 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Actually, on the Zone diet the only grain Dr Sears in any way encourages the use of is oatmeal. Is that ok for those with gluten sensitivity? I can't swear that I'm eating absolutely no gluten, but on the zone diet, I am definitely eating far less. No bread, no egg noodles, no pasta. No baked goods of any kind. If someone with fibromyalgia has a gluten intolerance, what kinds of symptoms would they experience ?
    More Pain ? Or digestive problems ?

  • devorah
    13 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    More pain. In my experience, it takes quite a while for the system to clean out. I eat some oatmeal. It has some gluten, but as long as don't don't over-do, it seems okay.

  • farmgirl21
    13 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    My aunt has some symptoms of fibromyalgia and discovered the healing benefits of Epsom salts a few years ago. Sheâd been buying the same box for years but while in Walgreen a couple days ago, we found a new Epsom salt product in the elastic bandages section, called Pepsom Sports. She decided to try it and really loved the new spearmint formula (and the way she felt afterwards!). Just thought I would pass this information along to anyone struggling with this disease.

  • devorah
    13 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Magnesium does help a lot, but I found that I had to take it internally before it did me much good.

  • lynnanneh
    13 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I had fibromyalgia for five years. I was in so much pain everyday.I went to five different doctors and they all told me that I had it.
    A friend mentioned to me that coral calcium will help me sleep. So I bought some at GNC. I had taken it for about three weeks and I was waking up without pain. I figured that it was the coral calcium. I took two capsules twice daily and I felt so much better. There are two other people that I know of that have been helped from coral calcium. I used the GNC brand and then I ordered Nature's Way on line. I had been on so many different kinds of medications. They were not helping me. It was the coral calcium that was the key to my being pain free. I hope that this helps many of you. I would encourage anyone who has this terrible painful condition to try coral calcium. Also be sure to purcase the kind that they get from above, not below on the ocean floor. There are two ways of harvesting coral calcium, above and below. The kind that is gathered from above the Okinawa Sea is best. I would be interested in hearing back if anyone gets any relief from this like I have. I have been pain free since 2003.

  • lschell_oakland_edu
    11 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I am only 19 years old, I have been suffering from chronic pain for over ten years.. I have been seeing a doctor since age 10 and that is when my file begins. At first I had bad posture. I saw my chiropractor once a week, was in a back brace and forced to perfect my posture.. no fix as my posture was fine. Then I was diagnosed with scoliosis.. at age ten, suffering from chronic migraines and sever constant neck, shoulder, and upper back pain. I was perscribed with Vi-ox, Vicodine and Valuim at age TEN! I cried all day in school, not even able to carry my own back pack.. coming home just to beg and beg and beg my father to rub my back more and more. As he dug his fists into the knots in my neck that refused to loosen a massage that would cripple an average person I found temporary relief. Then Vi-ox was recalled and I was continuously sent to a chiropractor, physical therapy, and a pain clinic that quickly became a financial burden. But it was all they could offer.. as I grew in age the pain worsened.. now to my lower back oh only a new curve? then my hips in which I've torn muscles doing basic exercise or just simply walking because my muscles were so tight and I gained tolerance to the vicodine and valium.. taking it on a regular basis for relief.. as I grew older I got impatient no longer being able to afford my chiropractor or physical therapy and suffering. I saw a specialist, and then a orthopedic surgeon who broke me the news that I indeed was not suffering from scoliosis.. my spine was normal and in perfect health. I began to stretch and run until the muscles in my hips would no longer allow me to do so. I would spend the majority of the day stretching and wake up stiff as a board. I grew helpless, I saw a therapist and was treated for depression because at this point I was suicidal and still with no relief.. in February of 2010 I was diagnosed by the rheumatoid specialist at the University of Michigan with fibromyalgia.. after two other professional opinions with the same answer I was given more vicodine more valium, Lyrica, cymbalta, trazadone, klonzaphan, xanax, etc. AT ONLY 18! I spent time and money with yoga classes more physical therapy and three other chiropractors and now after all my research I feel like I have hit a brick wall. who knows anything about this disease? NO ONE! do you give this diagnosis just to diagnose? I'm scared, I'm confused, and every minute of every day I am aching and aching and aching with the most sever pain you could ever imagine which has now crept into my knees. I cant sleep, I can't eat, I cant work, Focus on my school work, I'm not able to even enjoy the company of family and friends. these drugs do nothing for me.. the muscle relaxers and pain medications numb the pain and continue to kill my liver and my body. The depression has gotten so much worse and I feel there is no help for any of us out there. I am only 19.. how will i feel or cope in 30 years? if i even make it that long.. I need help, I'm desperate for help.. I don't know if I can take this a minute longer.. please, anyone.. save me.

  • pintita10_att_net
    11 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I've had fibromyalgia for 2 and a half years now. This is the most horrible thing that has ever happened to me. I've always been very strong and could handle anything. But this, my God, has me feeling like I'm going to end up in a wheel chair. I'm only 49 years old. When I get the worst attacks it feels like the pain will last forever. I start losing my breath, and I get all the symptom of a heart attack. My legs could barely hold me up. Sometimes when I try to walk I will stumble. I cry and scream and nobody seems to know what a nightmare we live in feeling this horrible pain all over. I feel like I'm being tortured with pins and needles in my skin, and my legs feel like they're about to break; like they're in vice grips. It's so agonizing. All I can do is lay there and not move until it passes. I'm getting help from a doctor who seems to understand it a little. He's helping me with my diet and is giving me percocet and oxycodin 4 times a day; and ambien which calms the nerve pain very well. I suffered the first two years with nothing; now the medicine makes all the difference in the world. I don't like taking it but it's the only thing that makes the pain more bearable, the side effects are very minimal. Now I only have 2 to 3 attacks a month. However, I'm still looking around thinking there may be a cure someday. Thank you for listening, and take care of yourselves.

  • Healer
    10 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    It seems that many people do not know that fibromyalgia is just a name given to this decease which doctors do not know how to get to the root of the problem. Fibromyalgia is caused by dislocated and pinched nerves all over your body. I know a I have been a Healer for 14+ years. I met one who had fibromyalgia for 20 years and she seek natural treatments which helped her to health.

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