Help with wildflower ID

lisa_in_pa(z6 PA)

I found these while walking in the woods yesterday. I live in SE PA. Checked a native wildflower source for ID, but couldn't find these....

Thanks for your help!

Lisa

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JanetGranny

1) One of the milkweeds.... http://www.monarchwatch.org/milkweed/guide/

2)Virginia Bluebells (Mertensia virginica)http://www.newfs.org/inbloom1/flowerpages/virginia_bluebells.html

3)Fern

4) Not sure but it grows all over my yard in the early spring.

Hope this was some help anyway.

JanetGranny

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Iris GW

I can't see the pictures.

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lisa_in_pa(z6 PA)

I reorganized some pics on photobucket, and didn't realize it would affect my post here. Here they are again (not in the same order as before)....




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jillmcm(z6 PA)

Top one is Mertensia virginica; next is a fiddlehead, but I have no idea what fern; and I can't help with the next two, although I also have the bottom one growing everywhere!

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Iris GW

The fern looks like Cinnamon Fern and the last one looks like Henbit (a weed). Yes, the blue one is Va. Bluebells. I don't know the yellow one.

Here is a link that might be useful: Henbit

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carol23_gw(7a western NC)

The yellow one might be Barbarea vulgaris

Here is a link that might be useful: Barbarea vulgaris

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marymd7

1. agree mertensia
2. agree fern fiddlehead -- not sure what fern
3. not sure
4. definately lamium purpureum (purple dead nettle)

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gmehl(z5 PA)

#3 is barberea vulgaris (winter cress, yellow rocket)
not native that I know of;

I agree that #4 is lamium purureum (purple dead nettle, red henbit) and also introduced I believe.

My guess (and just a guess) on the fern is cinnamon fern because of the shape of litter from last season.

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waplummer(Z5 NY)

The fern is either Interrupted, Osmunda claytonia, or Cinnamon, O. cinnamonea. If there are little tuffs on the back of each frond near the stem, it is cinnamon.

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kayjones(Mo6b)

The third one is wild mustard aka Sinapsis arvensis.

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ladyslppr(z6 PA)

Both the wild mustard and henbit are quite common weeds here in Central PA. Both are common right now in corn fields that are not yet planted with corn, in gardens, along roads, etc.

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