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anoop_ghanwani

gas to induction

21 days ago
last modified: 21 days ago

What is involved in terms of cost of installation to go from gas to induction? I currently have a gas cooktop that I want to replace and am strongly considering induction before of indoor air quality. Most likely, I will go with least expensive Miele. I understand there's some prep work that would have to be done to accommodate an induction cooktop. Any idea how much that would cost? It is above or below $1000? The house was built in 2015.


I cook mostly simple stuff like rice and vegetables. No fancy wok or anything. I'm thinking induction would be better than gas for quicker, cleaner (in terms of indoor air quality) cooking, as I don't typically open windows or even run the hood fan when cooking.


No a fan of most of the options for gas because of heavy grates. I have back issues and lifting those is very uncomfortable for me. If I had to go gas I would need to find one with lightweight grates. But then those also tend to be the ones that aren't so good in terms of overall quality.

Comments (50)

  • PRO
    21 days ago

    The costs are any changes to the counter (no way for me to know) and adding a new 220 line. The cost of the 220 line is based on how far you are from the circuit panel and how complicated it is to install. Call an electrician and get a price.

  • 21 days ago

    We switched from a gas cooktop to induction a couple of months ago. We had to run a second 220 line for the cooktop since we couldn't "pigtail" off the current wire serving the wall oven below. As Hallett states above, that cost varies by situation. It cost us right under $1,000. YMMV

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  • 21 days ago

    @jrb451 do you miss anything about gas since the switch to induction?


    what changes are needed for the counter? this will be 36in replacing 36in and the induction one will have a frame.

  • 21 days ago

    No regrets with the change. There was a slight learning curve but there have been no downsides. Instead, it's been a nice improvement. Wouldn't hesitate to do it again.


    The cutout for our Bosch induction was the same as our Wolf gas cooktop. So, no alterations needed there. We disconnected the gas and lifted the Wolf out, then wired in the Bosch an dropped it in its place.

  • 21 days ago

    "What is involved in terms of cost of installation to go from gas to induction? I currently have a gas cooktop that I want to replace and am strongly considering induction before of indoor air quality."

    As noted above, you will need to add a 240 volt circuit as the gas cooktop only required a 120 volt circuit. In addition you may need to modify the countertop if its cutout dimensions are different than those of the replacement induction cooktop. Do you know the brand and model number of the current, gas cooktop? By knowing that, it'll be possible to find its cutout dimensions and, perhaps, find an induction cooktop that will fit in that space.

    anoop thanked wdccruise
  • 21 days ago

    It is a GE JGP633SET2SS.


    I’m looking at

    https://www.mieleusa.com/e/36-inch-induction-cooktop-operated-with-its-own-controls-km-7740-fr-12074220-p


    what do I need to check to see if the new one will fit?

  • 21 days ago
    last modified: 21 days ago

    The GE JGP633SET2SS requires a 33-7/8" x 19-1/8" cutout.

    The Miele KM7740 requires a 34 1/2 x 20 1/2 cutout so it will not fit in the exiting cutout without enlarging.

    All of the following will fit in the 33-7/8" x 19-1/8" cutout without modification:


    I'd consider the Frigidaire FPIC3677RF first because it has knobs like a gas cooktop, fits in the cutout, did well in CR's tests, and it's a bargain at $1250 at Best Buy.

    anoop thanked wdccruise
  • 21 days ago

    @wdccruise

    Thanks for the info! Didn't realize this was going to be a problem. I naively thought that anything approx. 36" will fit since it cutout is just roughly smaller than that.


    I thought about the regular knobs. On the one side (from an ease of use perspective) it seems preferable. But on other side (from a cleaning standpoint), it seems like it would be less desirable--you have to pop the knob off to clean under it and sometimes they don't fit back on right. This is actually one of the problems that I have with my current cooktop (the cleaning lady comes in and does the deep cleaning and then the knobs don't fit back on quite right).

  • 21 days ago

    All the GE Profile PHP9036 models which performed well in CR's tests are on sale at geappliances.com.

    I have an LG induction range with knobs and, yeah, they're a bit more difficult to clean but I like the ability to quickly spin the knobs to the desired power level or off. The Frigidaire FPIC3677RF also has power-level indicators right above the knobs.

    anoop thanked wdccruise
  • 21 days ago

    One thing that I see with the Frigidaire FPIC3677RF is that the frame doesn't extend to the sides or the back. Does that make it more susceptible to cracking due to impact on the edge?

  • 21 days ago

    One question about gas -- is there something that newer gas stoves do to make them safer and/or easier to clean?

  • 21 days ago

    The glass cooktops of most induction units just rest on the countertop.

  • PRO
    21 days ago

    Electric power is overloaded already. Glass tops are miserable to clean and keep looking clean. A gas cooktop also can be lit during a power outage. Much prefer gas. Just my preference.

    anoop thanked Flo Mangan
  • 21 days ago

    The mother has had electric from building of the 1964 house to current (LOL). I've never had gas. Power failures are rare enough to be a non-issue ... although of course YMMV per local conditions. One sister has always had gas in her several houses, none of the houses were built new by her choice. I believe the other sister had electric until the the third house now, also not her specific choice for any of them.

    Granny always had a gas range. The heat produced in her kitchen was dreadful during family gatherings or when she did a big baking session of kolaches, cinnamon rolls, etc.

  • PRO
    21 days ago

    I had electric from growing up until I designed and built our showcase home. I put a dual fuel (Miele) Modular cook top in. 2 gas burners and two electric. Next houses all gas. I am a cook who loves French cooking but gas is definitely my choice. Heat in kitchen is due to steam rising from cooking so perhaps induction reduces that some but surely not for me. So it really depends on your cooking needs and wants. I can tell you my French chefs in our area will use gas only! lol.

    anoop thanked Flo Mangan
  • 21 days ago
    last modified: 21 days ago

    Flo Mangan: "Electric power is overloaded already."

    No, the OP doesn't live in South Africa.

    "Glass tops are miserable to clean and keep looking clean."

    No, induction cooktops are easy to clean unlike radiant cooktops where spills can bake onto the hot glass. I just use Mrs. Meyers Multi-Surface and a paper towel. A sample Weiman Cooktop Cleaner shipped with my LG range.

    "Heat in kitchen is due to steam rising from cooking so perhaps induction reduces that some but surely not for me."

    It's not perhaps. It does because unlike radiant or gas cooktops, induction only "heats" the cooking pot, not the air in the kitchen.

    "I put a dual fuel (Miele) Modular cook top in. 2 gas burners and two electric."

    Miele does not offer a modular (aka "Combiset") induction cooktop, only radiant. (Perhaps it did in the past.)

    anoop thanked wdccruise
  • 21 days ago

    I've had GE Profile induction in my last three homes, and I love them, but I'm far from being a French chef. I find them easy to use and easy to clean. My controls are digital, and I love being knob-free!


    My son purchased a gas range for its advantages, and he regrets it for health reasons. He wants to replace it asap. Meanwhile, he takes extra measures to ventilate well, but says that he would replace it immediately if he had children. He's an environmental scientist.

    anoop thanked dsimber
  • 20 days ago

    @anoop


    I own the Frigdare unit and it has been a very good unit for the past 6 years. I believe we purchased it in 2018? The knobs are removed routinely for cleaning and there has never been a fitment issue when replacing. I am a stickler though and ensure each knob is replaced where is was removed from. We have never broken or chipped the glass surface. Now the bad. The frame in the front is very susceptible to scratching and over the years does not look as great as it did when it was new. As such I am thankful it does not extent completely around the appliance. This is a Con for some, but it does not bother me. It is pretty bare bones. No fancy features to speak of. It has 19 Power setting from LO to Boost. A bridge feature. Power levels are displayed above each knob in blue and a red power LED to indicate the unit is on. The largest HOB strangely is not the most powerful one. no matter what the manual says. The center Hob will produce more power than the far right. The far right will simmer on LO better than the center though. So I am guessing that is some kind of trade off? It is simple, basic and it has been very reliable. Not a single issue since I've owned it. I would have no problem recommending the unit to anyone it appeals to. That best buy price is a steal. I paid a little over $2500 for mine and it still seems the price is still hovering in that area with everyone except Best Buy. Hope this helps.

  • 20 days ago

    We had a Wolf 30”, no frame. I did not want a frame, I believe it traps junk. We chose our model based on how we cook by considering the hob layout between Bosch and Wolf. We moved and I miss that cooktop very much. In time, we will replace what came with this house with another induction.

  • 20 days ago

    @kevinande: "The largest HOB strangely is not the most powerful one. no matter what the manual says. The center Hob will produce more power than the far right."

    The power levels are very similar as shown in the specs. However the two right-hand elements share a generator while the center is independent as shown on page 11 of the user manual. So if the right rear element were in use, the power of the right front could be reduced while the power of the center element would remain unaffected.

  • 20 days ago
    last modified: 20 days ago

    Stopped by a local mid-to-high-end appliance/lighting store today. They said they are still selling 90% gas and only 10% induction! Looked at Miele gas, those wok burners look like they would be a pain to clean.

  • 20 days ago

    "They said they are still selling 90% gas and only 10% induction!"

    Miele offers 21 gas or dual-fuel ranges and one induction range. It offers seven 36" gas cooktops and three induction cooktops, two of which differ only be how they're mounted. Shoppers who want induction shop elsewhere.

  • 20 days ago
    last modified: 20 days ago

    This store had many brands like Wolf, Thermador, Bosch, etc. The rep I spoke to said the best selling cooktop for both gas and induction is Wolf. I got a similar answer on induction vs gas at Lowes. Induction doesn’t seem to be taking off as much. My guess is that most people won’t want to spend extra on getting the 240v. You have to really want one.

  • 19 days ago

    Electric resistance is still very popular because of the price point. In addition there is a very large segment of the US population who simply are not aware that the technology exist. Also consider that some people are really attached to their cookware and some of it may not be compatible with induction. So in addition to the cost of the appliance (perhaps having to run electrical if a 240 circuit does not exist) some will have to invest in new cookware. Sometimes it's just easier and cheaper to stick with traditional methods of cooking.

  • 19 days ago
    last modified: 19 days ago

    "The rep I spoke to said the best selling cooktop for both gas and induction is Wolf."

    If I were a rep selling Wolf CI36560T/S or Wolf CI36560C/B induction cooktops at $4,000 a pop, I'd make sure those were the best-selling induction cooktops in the store.

  • 19 days ago

    @wdccruise haha … I didn’t think of it that way !!

  • 19 days ago

    I switched to induction eight years ago and love everything about it. Had a Wolf gas cooktop in my last house and moved to a house with a radiant electric range. The induction range I purchased said 40 amp and 50 amp in the specs so to be safe I upgraded the electrical circuit to 50 which also required an upgrade to the wiring - less complicated than switching from gas - and my electrical panel was not too far away in the unfinished part of my basement. I think it was around $800 to do this. I recently bought a second home and was happy to find one with a radiant electric cooktop - much easier to switch out for induction than gas. I chuckled at the realtor who reminded me the house had natural gas so I could switch it out for a gas cooktop. I said no thanks - I'll be switching to induction. He looked at me like I had two heads.

  • 19 days ago

    For the price of the cheapest Wolf gas cooktop ($2550) or induction cooktop ($3500) neither of which will fit in your cutout, you could probably buy the Frigidaire cooktop, a 240-volt circuit, and maybe even a set of induction-compatible pots and pans.

  • 19 days ago

    I already had All-Clad so didn't need new cookware, but I would have gladly added that cost to have the efficiency and ease of induction. I also really like the sleek appearance.

  • 19 days ago
    last modified: 19 days ago

    I’m not a Wolf fan so I would’t get one. I would prefer Miele (which you say doesn’t fit my cutout), or Bosch/Thermador. The rep said the cutout may already be bigger than the current unit and may accommodate a slightly larger appliance so it would best to measure it to know the actual size. Unfortunately, due to a back injury I don’t have enough mobility to do it myself (I tried yesterday).


    My cookware is all stainless steel so I don’t have any problems there.

  • 19 days ago

    Stainless steel (officially corrosion resisting steel -- CRES) has many formulas depending on use. The largest fractions added to iron are nickel and chromium. Depending on the formulation, the CRES may or may not be inductive (generate heating currents in the steel in reaction to an induction field). No current no heating. The shiniest CRES is typically non-magnetic and non-inductive. Cookware that claims operation with induction may hide the inductive steel inside a sandwich of metals, or just use a one-layer magnetic steel formulation and accept potential discoloration.

  • 19 days ago

    I have Fissler pots. Here's what they say:

    • 18/10 stainless steel construction in a satin finish
    • Energy efficient Fissler CookStar® base for optimal heat distribution
    • Compatible with all stove types, including induction
  • 19 days ago

    what material is your counter? Enlarging the opening slightly may not be a large expense to get the cooktop that you want.

  • 19 days ago

    That's right. It only will be cut and finished on two sides. I'd also choose Miele followed by Bosch. Miele is getting their new US factory for cooking appliances online this fall. If they could produce the full surface cooktops they've offered in Europe that would be great. You can see them on their UK site.

  • 19 days ago

    @Kim G the countertop uses silestone.

  • 19 days ago

    Hmmm. Normally 18/10 is a 300 series (type 304) austenitic stainless steel that is non-magnetic. Removal of the nickel (the "10" percent component) leads to 400 series (type 430) ferritic stainless steel which is magnetic. Perhaps the Fissler information refers only to the exposed material; multi-ply pan bases can be non-inductive 18/10 on the exposed surfaces and have a more magnetic material inside, along with a heat spreader such as aluminum or copper.

    An extreme example is demeyere Atlantis pans, where there are 7 layers comprising (inside to outside) 18/10 stainless, silver, copper, silver, and three mystery* stainless steel layers denoted Triple Induction (Triplinduc), where the actual inductive steel is found.

    ____

    *some clues may be found in https://patents.google.com/patent/US7335428B2/en

  • 19 days ago

    I would contact a fabricator and see what the cost would be to enlarge you opening if needed. I would not expect it to be very expensive, but it won’t be free.

  • 17 days ago
    last modified: 17 days ago

    correction in brackets...

    This appeared in [NYT Climate Forward] today. Quotes:

    "now well established in scientific literature. Researchers have found that gas stoves emit nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, and the carcinogen benzene, among other air pollutants linked to a range of respiratory issues and illnesses like asthma and cancer."

    and

    "cooking on a gas stove can release more of the cancer-causing chemical benzene than secondhand smoke. And researchers in Boston recently found that unburned gas in stoves and pipelines can leak 21 different hazardous air pollutants into homes."

    and

    "...nitrogen dioxide pollution from gas stoves drifts from the kitchen to bedrooms and can linger for hours. Long-term exposure to those higher levels of nitrogen dioxide alone could account for around 50,000 cases of current pediatric asthma."

    source:

    https://nl.nytimes.com/f/a/5NJa-qPSg4Z6DgyHtP376A~~/AAAAAQA~/RgRoXYXFP4QVAWh0dHBzOi8vd3d3LmNhbmFyeW1lZGlhLmNvbS9hcnRpY2xlcy9mb3NzaWwtZnVlbHMvZ2FzLXN0b3ZlLWhlYWx0aC13YXJuaW5nLWxhYmVscy1oZWFsdGgtY2FsaWZvcm5pYS1uZXcteW9yay1pbGxpbm9pcy1nZT9jYW1wYWlnbl9pZD01NCZlbWM9ZWRpdF9jbGltXzIwMjQwNjI1Jmluc3RhbmNlX2lkPTEyNzE1MSZubD1jbGltYXRlLWZvcndhcmQmcmVnaV9pZD04MDQ5NTMzMCZzZWdtZW50X2lkPTE3MDUwNiZ0ZT0xJnVzZXJfaWQ9YmUwZTI4M2Q1YTRlMzY0ZDNhOTlkYWYzNjMwOTZmYWZXA255dEIKZnTFAHtmyu99-FIUZGViLnNpbW1lckBnbWFpbC5jb21YBAAAAAM~

  • 17 days ago

    Hence, having a hood system (with MUA system) that provides near total capture and containment, as commercial systems are intended to achieve, allows cooking by whatever means without being dosed by compounds inimical to the respiratory system.

    The first dozen or so pages should clarify this point: https://www.tagengineering.ca/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/KVSApplDesign_catalog.pdf.

    Also, @opaone has addressed cooking pollution in a few discussions in this forum.

    Anyway, w.r.t. the OP's OP, induction will have less aerosol pollutants because the maximum temperatures involved are those of the food, and not those of a combustion process (unless one's cooking tends to the flambé).

  • 17 days ago

    The more I research it, the more I'm sold on induction. I'm just concerned about the amount of extra work that it will need -- putting in a 240v/50A line and plugging the gas pipe.

  • PRO
    17 days ago

    We have cooked on induction since moving into this house four years ago, and just ripped the gas stove out of our summer rental and putting induction there too- just so much nicer all around.

  • 15 days ago

    "putting in a 240v/50A line"

    Be sure to read the installation manuals of the cooktops you're considering to determine the proper location of the 240-volt junction box.

  • 15 days ago

    Does that mean there’s not a universal location that works for all? If I put one in to match a cooktop and it doesn’t ee work out and a few years later I want to put in a different one, does that mean the box may need to be moved?

  • 14 days ago

    My first and my present induction cooktops had/have a flexible conduit (flex) a few feet long to connect to a box that would be mounted somewhere within reach inside the cabinet. The box has to be accessible for disconnection. You can build it into the wall behind the cabinet and cut the cabinet back for fitting the cover plate.

    This is far more universal than the required cut-out sizes for the counter surface.

    You could tour downloaded installation guides of representative cooktops to see how they vary in connection details.

  • 14 days ago

    "Does that mean there’s not a universal location that works for all?"

    The Frigidaire instructions recommended an "approximate" location of the electrical box 12" below the cooktop, LG recommended 10", and GE Profile recommended a minimum of 16".

  • 13 days ago

    If you use drawers or racks in your cabinet, make them shorter than the cabinet depth so there is room for an intermediate surface box if the connection for some later replacement cooktop is incompatible with your existing electrical box.

  • 13 days ago

    anoop If you run into that situation, you can change the wire attached to the cooktop to a longer piece.

  • 13 days ago

    In my experience, the induction cooktop wiring (and my wall oven wiring) uses higher temperature rated conductors than standard house wiring. This is to save copper, I think. So make wire changes only after learning what you need to know about the subject.

  • 13 days ago

    All the cooktops are equippped with an armored cable that contains the wires that connect to the electrical box. Only GE Profile instructions state the length of that cable: four feet. The important things are that distance between the cooktop and electrical box not exceed the length of the cable (with slack) and that any shelves or drawers under the cooktop not interfere with the cable.