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rouge21_gw

Your June 2024 highlights

11 days ago
last modified: 11 days ago

Each early June I tout this plant (Aconitum "Ivorine").


Here it is from this week


Comments (64)

  • 10 days ago

    Spring in Springfield, OR.


    Nigella


    Poppies


    Foxglove

    North garden w/hostas


    Front garden


    rouge21_gw (CDN Z5b/6a) thanked theotherjaye
  • 10 days ago

    Iw, my HF Young has bloomed spectacularly every spring except this sort thanks to my ill advised late pruning. It is starting to show some buds now. Perhaps I should fertilize it more. Here it is from last spring. Yes, it does turn turn crisp as summer progresses, but often reblooms. I have found that some pruning after spring blooms does produce more blooms. Also, I think I may not be watering it enough during the summer.

    rouge21_gw (CDN Z5b/6a) thanked getgoing100_7b_nj
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  • 10 days ago
    last modified: 10 days ago

    Theotherjaye - I love to see a front garden without lawn! And yours looks really interesting. It’s neat and it compliments your house. I bet you have a lot of multi season bloom. And the north garden is a classic combo with the ferns, hostas, foxglove and heuchera.

    GetGoing - Your balcony garden is a delight! And that HF Young Clematis looks very healthy. It probably is just a pruning issue this year.

    For you and Jaye - about Clematis crisping up in the summer heat, yours is on that balcony, is it in full sun all day? It might be too hot in the summer and now our summers are hotter.It might like a location with a little afternoon shade, if you can provide it. I would think it is harder to keep the roots cool in a pot, so more afternoon shade might help. But I'm not a Clematis expert, you might post on the Clematis forum and ask about it. Especially with the yellowing leaves, might be an indicator of something else.

    rouge21_gw (CDN Z5b/6a) thanked prairiemoon2 z6b MA
  • 10 days ago

    Ahhh maybe it is the heat—it doesnt get shade until 4 in the afternoon. I’ll try moving it this fall!




    rouge21_gw (CDN Z5b/6a) thanked lw (7a SE Pennsylvania)
  • 10 days ago

    Btw—your clem is gorgeous, getgoing! and that aconitum, Rouge! It’s for sure on my to-plant list

    rouge21_gw (CDN Z5b/6a) thanked lw (7a SE Pennsylvania)
  • 10 days ago

    Iw, how old is your HF Young? Mine is about 7 years old from bare root. Gve it a 30% prune after blooms are done and it just might be more productive and less crisp during the summer.


    Prairiemoon, my balcony is NNW facing and only gets full sun in peak summer in some corners. I move everything around all the time. When I moved the clematis to a shadier location last summer, I got two flowers for a toke rebloom in late fall. I will keep an eye on the water and sun/wind exposure (I think the wind does more damage) given that it will essentially be the first blooms when it does decide to put all that growth to some productive use.

    rouge21_gw (CDN Z5b/6a) thanked getgoing100_7b_nj
  • 10 days ago

    Its pretty established—7 or 8 years? It was one of the first things I ever planted, before I really had the faintest idea of what I was doing. (Im only slightly better now lol). It’s been on drip irrigation the last 2 years.


    will try a 30% trim and see how that goes! In previous years I hadn’t been that aggressive. Thanks!!

    rouge21_gw (CDN Z5b/6a) thanked lw (7a SE Pennsylvania)
  • 10 days ago

    @getgoing100_7b_nj I am always so impressed with your balcony displays.

  • 10 days ago

    10 days to 2 weeks ahead of "schedule" for our 2 established John Cabots:





  • 10 days ago

    Liberty hosta, the ubiquitous corydalis lutea, a Brunnera and Double Stuff Polygonatum...



  • 10 days ago

    Thanks, Rouge. Lack of deer, slugs, rabbits and ease of fertilization make it a lot easier in some ways. Lack of space is another matter. I used to hang the railing planters facing out in contravention of condo rules to maximize my 15'x5' space and sun exposure but they put people on notice last year shrinking the space further. But where there is a will there is a way.

    rouge21_gw (CDN Z5b/6a) thanked getgoing100_7b_nj
  • 10 days ago

    That's a great John Cabot and beautiful shady area, Rouge. Love your balcony plants, getgoing. Prairiemoon, those are such pretty foxgloves with the blue flowers in front. Can't tell what they are. Both Jays....beautiful plants. I like the pitcher clematis.

    Lollipop verbena this spring. It had some powdery mildew last year but none this year. It is so much branchier than regular verbena bonariensis and it's shorter.



    Sunflower, Firecracker...new to me


    Pugster Amethyst buddliea - is less pink in person, more lavender


    Hollyhock, Creme de Cassis ...same plant was single last year

    Clematis Negritjanka and Arctic Queen

    rouge21_gw (CDN Z5b/6a) thanked erasmus_gw
  • 10 days ago

    Iw, the way I prune is to keep the basic structure, the thicker older vines and chop off the weak growth. Eventually, I think each plant has its set of genes, some just have stronger genes than others. None of my other clem come close to this guy.

    rouge21_gw (CDN Z5b/6a) thanked getgoing100_7b_nj
  • 9 days ago
    last modified: 9 days ago

    GetGoing, you do a LOT on a balcony facing NNW…lol. And the way your HF Young blooms for you …you’ve had it for 7 years…seems like you are doing a lot right. It has to make it easier to try different locations in pots. If it’s wind, I’m not sure what you can do. Even putting an open trellis between it and the wind would cut down on the sun.

    rouge21_gw (CDN Z5b/6a) thanked prairiemoon2 z6b MA
  • 9 days ago
    last modified: 9 days ago

    Rouge…I’ve always loved that John Cabot. It pushes out so many blooms, so vigorous. Love the way you’ve managed it. And that’s a little jewel box of a shade garden display!

    Erasmus, that’s Nepeta ‘Walker’s Low’ in front of the Foxglove. You can see it’s a little floppy. That area is facing south, but, it has two huge Maples, one to the West and one to the East to deal wtih, so maybe that area gets 4 hrs of sun?

    You have a blooming sunflower already?

    Quite the combo of Clematis. Arctic Queen has such large beautiful blooms and the Clematis Negritjanka is such a dark color. I don’t think I’ve seen a Clematis that dark before. Beautiful.

    rouge21_gw (CDN Z5b/6a) thanked prairiemoon2 z6b MA
  • 9 days ago


    Scutellaria incana. The foliage is beautiful with the purple edges. The flowers are spectacular. I just recieved 4 Scutellaria leonardii plants in perfect condition. They already bloomed, but they are loaded with seeds.

    Oxeye False Sunflower, Heliopsis helianthoides is already blooming.

    Snow Parsley, Cnidium monieri. An herb with it's use beginning way back in ancient China.

    The 2 stars are the Lilium michiganense and Lilium philidelphicum. This is my 1st time having blooming native lilies. I've been trying for years. Lilium canadense and Lilium superbum are still on my bucket list. Also Mayflower, Maianthemum canadense, Clintonia borealis and Streptopus lanceolata. I've had blooming Erythronium albidum and Camassia sciloides for a while. The liles should open sometime in the next few days.

    All white, Penstemon tubaeflorus, Blephilia hirsuta and Erigeron philidelphicum

    The weedy Geum canadense.

    A vollunteer Bowman's Root, Gillenia trifoliata, Great Blue Lobelia, Rattlesnake Master, Spicebush and the Lactuca from hell in the shadows.

    Prairie Sundrops, Oenothera pilosella. My camera does not capture yellows very well.

    The beautiful but extremely thuggish Bush's Poppy Mallow. This one escaped the culling, so it stays for now, but I'm keeping an eye on it and it will be deadheaded.

    Gaillardia aristata. For years I wished for a truly hardy Blanketflower, and now they are everywhere.

    Purple Milkweed, Asclepias purpurascens.

    Yucca flaccida.

    Plantago lanceolata. It's considered a useless lawn weed, but when it's allowed to grow it has a beautiful form. It's a host plant for the Buckeye Butterfly,

    Plantago lanceolata.

    Clematis viorna.

    Aaron's Rod, Thermopsis villosus

    Clematis pitcheri. It doesn't want to climb this year.

    Yellow Pimpernel, Taenidia integerrima. One of my top fave umbellifers. I struggled for a couple years trying to germinate the seeds, but had great success direct scattering them. And the seeds were fresh, which probably helped. The foliage is amazing.

  • 9 days ago
    last modified: 9 days ago

    Clematis 'Joe Zary' currently displaying lovely particularly light colored blooms, must be this springs unseasonably very cool conditions. The variety was developed by a friend of mine, Stan Zubrowski of Saskatchewan. Unfortunately, Stan failed to secure patent upon this plant that has made itself around the globe and would have garnered a handsome royalty for himself. 'Joe Zary' is zone 2 hardy and continues to carry some flowers for the entire growing season.


    rouge21_gw (CDN Z5b/6a) thanked FrozeBudd_z3/4
  • 8 days ago

    I love your Thalictrum dasycarpum, Jay! And you don’t have scarlet lily beetle with those lilies?

    Theotherjaye, your front garden is beautiful, and I love the warm colour of the front of your house.

    Getgoing, I have never seen clematis grown on a balcony. Great idea!

    Rouge, that huge John Cabot makes me envious ;-). Is Liberty also your favourite hosta? I think it is mine.


    I have Gladiolus illyricus blooming. I used to have it near a magenta geranium, so I would often not even notice it blooming. Now it is near the variegated irises, and it stands out, small as it is.


    Peony ’Bartzella and Geranium magnificum.


    I always enjoy the combination of purple smokebush, Allium christophii, and Nectaroscordum. The last one is a bit past its prime here.


    rouge21_gw (CDN Z5b/6a) thanked gdinieontarioz5
  • 8 days ago
    last modified: 8 days ago

    Simply gorgeous everyone! I missed the May thread completely but it was inspiring too.



    Showy Lady Slipper - Cypripedium reginae



    Climbing Hydrangea



    Iris s. 'Painted Woman'


    Iris s. 'Roanokes Choice'



    Peony 'Bartzella' on its 2nd year with more buds coming. I hope mine looks like yours one year gdinie!



    Peony 'Red Charm'. I really need to weed this bed so I could not show the entire plant!

    rouge21_gw (CDN Z5b/6a) thanked peren.all Zone 5a Ontario Canada
  • 8 days ago

    Jay, I’d love to know what your garden goals are. Are you going native or just stay away from hybrids, or something I haven’t thought of? [g] Maybe you just grow what you love…lol.

    Clematis viorna, is very sweet. Love the color of that Purple Milkweed, do you grow it from seed? I’ve been tempted to grow Poppy Mallow - I love the color - but I stay away from thugs as much as possible. It’s beautiful! That white Penstemon tubaeflorus is quite showy.

    I hope you will post when the Lilium michiganense and the Lilium philidelphicum are in bloom. Michigan is one of my favorites and not readily available, is it?

    rouge21_gw (CDN Z5b/6a) thanked prairiemoon2 z6b MA
  • 8 days ago

    FBudd, that is the most unusual Clematis I’ve seen! It’s a double? The color is very pretty with the edge outline. What is that you have it growing on?

    GDOntario, Love that color Gladiolus and the combo with the variegated Iris. Wow, on that Peony ‘Bartzella’ and that is a Geranium magnificum? I guess I’ve never seen it, I love the size of the blooms, the height and the dense bloom. Where did you find it? I don’t make room for Peonies because of their short bloom time, but that is a gorgeous one! What huge blooms. And it’s not a shrub peony, right? Does it have support?

    PerenAll, Were your Lady Slippers native to your property? They are GOR-geous! And Climbing Hydrangea is one of my favorites. How did you get so much bloom on yours and what is it climbing on?

    rouge21_gw (CDN Z5b/6a) thanked prairiemoon2 z6b MA
  • 8 days ago

    I love your Thalictrum dasycarpum, Jay!


    Ditto for me @gdinieontarioz5.


    Jay when you have time can you elaborate on the specifics of this specimen?

    How tall is it...it looks tall in the picture. And it was only early June and yet it seemed very floriferous. Can we have a closeup of the flowers?







  • 8 days ago

    'peren', your hydrangea is spectacular! I dont think we see many posted in the forum as they take up lots of "real estate"...gorgeous. And so I will post another currently blooming climber. It isn't mine but it is right next door to us.



  • 8 days ago

    That's just about all the buds open on Beverly, so it should be nearing the end of it's first flush of bloom. It does get a second flush but it's not as good as the first. Julia Child rose and Penstemon too.


    rouge21_gw (CDN Z5b/6a) thanked prairiemoon2 z6b MA
  • 8 days ago

    Peren-all, such lovely plants! My 'Caesar's Brother' wouldn't recognize its cousins ;-). And I have always wanted to see that 'Red Charm' peony. Is it irl darker than your picture? Just give your 'Bartzella' some time. I have had mine for at least 12 years. I think it has now gotten to its final size, it has been stable the last few years.


    Prairiemoon, 'Bartzella' is an Itoh peony, a cross between a herbaceous peony and a tree peony. The stems are very strong, it is still standing pretty upright at the moment without any supports, despite a lot of rain the last week. Seeing the size and weight of the blooms, that is quite a feat. The plant almost completely dies down in winter, but after a mild one, there is some regrowth from low down on the stems.

    I just spent a fun half hour looking through my old gardening notes for info about the G. magnificum. I stopped keeping track in the early 2000s, but I still have the computer folder. It seems I got it in 1995 from a local garden centre where they always had a great selection of perennials. Maybe it had something to do with the perennials manager being from Great Britain?! Around 2015 the business was sold, and it is now 'just another independent garden centre'. The manager is still there, I talked to him briefly yesterday, but the direction of the business and the direction of gardening have changed. The geranium is a firm favourite, even though it blooms only in June. The size, colour and upright form make it a stand-out.

    rouge21_gw (CDN Z5b/6a) thanked gdinieontarioz5
  • 8 days ago

    @jay - I only knew those plantanas by their commmon name. I have a couple in my backyard, and like you find them quite attractive even though they’re considered a weed.

    rouge21_gw (CDN Z5b/6a) thanked theotherjaye
  • 7 days ago

    GdinieOntario - That is so interesting about your Bartzella. You’ve done a great job working it into your garden design. I didn’t know there was such a thing as a cross between the herbaceous and tree peony. I find myself very disappointed with plants that droop. Especially since I have so little full sun that many of my plants are trying to grow in less than ideal light. The strength of your plant does appeal to me. I’ll have to put it on my list, for when I find some room. [g]

    I like the story of how you came by the Geranium magnificum.. I just don’t think there are many interesting Geraniums [cranesbill?] here in North America. That it could have come from Britain, makes a lot more sense. It might have been in the mid 90s, when I saw an article in a gardening magazines on a collector of Geraniums and she had so many really different and pretty cultivars. But I haven’t come across most of them. I look in every nursery I visit and see the same varieties over and over and they are not nearly as attractive has yours or those in the magazine. Maybe I need to put more effort into finding a nursery that specializes.

    rouge21_gw (CDN Z5b/6a) thanked prairiemoon2 z6b MA
  • 7 days ago

    I am sure I knew it from the books of some British lady, probably Penelope Hobhouse. I think it was a pretty common plant there at the time. So as soon as I saw it in the nursery, I grabbed it!

    rouge21_gw (CDN Z5b/6a) thanked gdinieontarioz5
  • 7 days ago

    My geranium phase coincided with the peak of the fabled Heronswood Nursery, which fortunately was only a short drive away. At one time, they offered 95 (!!) different species and cultivars of hardy geraniums! I didn't get that into it but I did grow a bunch. Since Heronswood's demise and my changing garden habits, I no longer focus on geraniums. My passions have transferred to things like Japanese maples and dwarf conifers with appreciably higher price tags. I buy in much less quantities these days. Smaller garden and necessarily limited plant selection so have become very choosy.

    Lacking access to someplace like Heronswood, Geraniaceae Nursery is your best bet for the largest hardy geranium selection.

    rouge21_gw (CDN Z5b/6a) thanked gardengal48 (PNW Z8/9)
  • 7 days ago

    GDinieOntario - I used to drag home a lot of garden books of gardens in England. They seem to have more choice selections in many things than we do. [g]

    GGal - Thank you! I'll try looking for something there!

    rouge21_gw (CDN Z5b/6a) thanked prairiemoon2 z6b MA
  • 7 days ago
    last modified: 7 days ago

    Silvery Rose strawflower, all of them, at different stages.






    I grow these because they were endangered, and because I live in Middle Tennessee, though they are no longer endangered. Echinacea tennesseensis



    My first Dahlia bloom (I'm really sad because my other dahlia plant did not make it even though it is lasted through several really cold winters)

    'Crazy Love'


    And an experiment I'm trying this year, getting my favorite nasturtium to climb

    'Moonlight'


    Bronze fennel



    I have grown Nandina for a thousand years and never seen it in flower. I don't know why I'm not paying attention, pretty little white flowers. Almost looks like epimedium


    rouge21_gw (CDN Z5b/6a) thanked rob333 (zone 7b)
  • 7 days ago

    Grand Paradaiso Lilies, Lupines, Larkspurs and Alliums. There are some blue thistles, a Plantana and an Epidemium in there, too, if you look closely.

    Sweet William and California Poppies:


    rouge21_gw (CDN Z5b/6a) thanked theotherjaye
  • 7 days ago
    last modified: 7 days ago

    pm the Cypripedium were not on the property originally but are native here. They are very special to me. A friend/neighbour called and asked if I could come over. He wanted to give me half of his because he had changed his eavestroughing and worried that they would not get enough moisture. He wanted to insure that if his died he could get some back. It turned out his were fine. He has since passed so I cherish them all the more.

    Hmm the Hydrangea has southern expose but is protected from the western sun. I have never fertilized but I have had to exert control. I waited a few years for it to establish and now I have to hack it back every couple of years otherwise it wants to fill the walkway. They grow up and out lol.

    Thank you! The arbor is in the shape of a plus sign. I went out and took these pics a few minutes ago after the rain stopped. You can't see the full structure any more. Actinidia kolomikta is on the far right then Actinidia arguta 'Issai' (I really need to get it under control too) is on the post in front of the Hydrangea. I have to move all the Clematis that are languishing from being shaded out. The posts are 6"x6".





    This is the Hydrangea on the inside of the arbor.

    Thank you rouge! The Hydrangea certainly does take up a lot of real estate. You are very fortunate to have the "borrowed view" your neighbour provides for you!

    gdinie thank you! I still have & adore 'Caesar's Brother' and so do the butterflies. It is a classic for good reason. I have been so impressed with Bartzella so far (it is on its 2nd year). If mine gets half as good as yours in time I will be delighted! Red Charm is so much deeper and darker a red in person. As soon as I posted I noticed the change. It did not do it justice.

    rouge21_gw (CDN Z5b/6a) thanked peren.all Zone 5a Ontario Canada
  • 7 days ago
    last modified: 7 days ago

    Prairiemoon, I have 'Joe Zary' growing upon some plastic coated metal shelving placed against the house. The foliage isn't unhealthy if anyone might wonder, it's a variegated sport. Ohhh, your 'Beverly' sure is a beauty!

    Just a petunia, though this one jumped out at me at the greenhouse with blooms showing a strikingly different pattern from all others within the lot of the particular variety.

    Peren.all, your iris are glorious, and so is the orchid reginae, 'Bartzella' really can't get any better than that!

    Theotherjaye, LOVE your photos !! :)

    rouge21_gw (CDN Z5b/6a) thanked FrozeBudd_z3/4
  • 7 days ago

    Rob, I’ve never tried strawflowers - really interesting. Do you use them dried for something?

    I love the way that Nasturtium is climbing your steps. Is there a difference between climbing nasturtiums and trailing nasturtium?

    OtherJay - What a colorful garden you have! Those lilies and poppies and sweet William…so bright and cheerful!

    PerenAll - I never attempt a Lady’s Slipper because I always heard they don’t transplant well. But I suppose if they are native there, that makes a difference. And are there some lady slippers that are easier to relocate than others? So great that you have a part of your friend’s garden. Wouldn’t he love to know they are carrying on.

    The climbing hydrangea has a Southern exposure….wow. That’s surprising, but explains why you have such great bloom on it and I’m sure the protection from western exposure is needed. I have a friend who only gets a little bloom and I think they may have it in too much shade. Look at all the growth on everything there! You must have great soil.

    FBudd - I thought ‘Joe Zary’ was growing on that! Lol such a creative way to support it. It is SO unusual looking…you must be really enjoying it.

    rouge21_gw (CDN Z5b/6a) thanked prairiemoon2 z6b MA
  • 7 days ago

    Allium Globemaster seedheads, Oxeye Daisy taking over, Bellflower a little stronger blue than I wanted and going akimbo, lavender not yet in bloom, Clematis past its spring flowering and before (hopefully) its second flush, Millenium allium not yet in bloom… kind of an in-between phase but still pretty happy with it. But then I’m a messy cottage garden type.


    Realizing I need something else along the back with the tall allium for this period before Millenium opens up and after Globemaster has faded- maybe just another allium!



    rouge21_gw (CDN Z5b/6a) thanked HU-918119203
  • 7 days ago
    last modified: 7 days ago

    I just enjoy the tactile portions of my garden. Fuzzy lambs ears and fennel, soft petals, just a fun texture with strawflowers. Pretty, and an interesting texture.

    floral is likely better at answering the nasturtium question. I know some are bushy and some have habits similar to my favorite. Here's the answer from floral as to whether or not they would climb back in January.

    " As for climbing, they really just scramble. If you give them a net, or even just the existing lattice, they'll probably set off up it. But they might need a bit of help with some weaving and tying in of stems. They are not self clinging. "

    They will sort of ramble and sort of trail, but if I train it up the trellis (background) or the stairs, they continue on.

    rouge21_gw (CDN Z5b/6a) thanked rob333 (zone 7b)
  • 6 days ago

    Some varieties of Rodgersia have attractive flowers.


    I think this one is Bronze Peacock:

  • 5 days ago

    My plant list gets A LOT longer after looking through these threads. So many great plants featured and gorgeous photos/gardens. Lots of eye candy in all the pictures above.






    rouge21_gw (CDN Z5b/6a) thanked Thyme2dig NH Zone 5
  • 5 days ago

    This is a new border we put in when our road was paved and the town did some work in our front yard for drainage and left us a nice, new planting space. Planted Spring 2021. Photos might be a little soft/blurry because there wasn't much light left this evening. And my eyes are blurry, so I can't tell! LOL!!


    Behind it is the slope garden.


  • 5 days ago

    Thyme2dig, I love your first picture with all the elegant arching movement of the grass (Hakonechloa?), Japanese maple and weigela. I am usually not a great fan of the last, but here it all comes together. Is that yellow peony another Bartzella? And you have lupines! I cannot get them to return here, but I love them from when as a kid I had one in my own little garden. I love the fragrance, though two of my friends think they stink...

    rouge21_gw (CDN Z5b/6a) thanked gdinieontarioz5
  • yesterday

    Thyme2dig: beautiful pictures!!

  • yesterday

    Columbine started from seed last year:



    Geranium Birch Double:



    Geranium Blushing Turtle




    A few bearded irises:




    Private Party:



    Sordid Lives:


    Peony Salmon Saucer


    My dog looking at a bird:


  • yesterday
    last modified: yesterday



    Tuberous Grass Pink


    Coral/Pink Canna


    Sambucus canadensis


    Festive Petunia


    Larkspur. Ive tried growing native Larkspur species a couple times, but they are difficult. This Consolida is the complete opposite.



    Yellow Canna


    Bottlebrush Grass in flower


    American Ginseng


    I love Deptford Pinks. They aren't native, but they pose no danger to our native flora, and are far less dangerous than Verbena bonariensis. They'd be great as a filler, just like our Linum sulcatum.

    Grooved Yellow Flax, Linum sulcatum.

  • yesterday

    Mazerolm, lovely columbines and beautiful peony. I love the singles. Jay, I didn’t know that Linum, I like it. Does the individual bloom only last a day?


    Here is my hands down favourite geranium, G. psilostemon. The intense colour, the texture like wrinkled velvet, the black centre, the height, they all get me lyrical. Pictures cannot do it justice.




    Streptocarpella is nice to keep some interest under the Japanese maple till the cyclamen reappear in late summer. It doesn’t grow much here, which is exactly what I want. They are just place holders for me.


    A huge Allium hubrichtii forms a comfy cushion for ’Munstead Wood’. I like this the best of my alliums. Silvery lilac spheres here and there among the other plants. With good feeding they become enormous, and to my surprise it blooms even in deep shade under the apple tree. Self sower, by now I remove all the seed heads before they ripen.




  • yesterday
    last modified: 23 hours ago

    Persicaria polymorpha. These were started from little bare roots in 2020.

    Wasn't sure how they’d do on my dry slope, but thankfully they are growing nicely.



    Top of slope with Baptisia


    Busy with bees…


    part of bottom slope


    Goatsbeard got huge this year


    Fashionably early Phlox


    Tiger eye Sumac…I’ve had these for years in old wash tubs….


  • 23 hours ago

    Forgot him, he was a challenge to get due to the breeze…



    rouge21_gw (CDN Z5b/6a) thanked GardenHo_MI_Z5
  • 34 minutes ago

    Wasn't sure how they’d do on my dry slope, but thankfully they are growing nicely.


    @GardenHo_MI_Z5 this is one of my favourite plants. You took the pictures at the right time showing the bright white of the flowers. It is a definitely water conserving plant.


    I have a long established stand but the past few years it has not nearly been as vigorous. In the spring and even winter I can see evidence of mice or the like burrowing under and around the roots :(.

  • 33 minutes ago

    Julia Childs


    Goat's Beard


  • 8 minutes ago

    Wow rouge! Which Angelca is that? I thought it was an Aralia tree at first. Your Hydrangea arborescens are slightly ahead of mine. Weird. Do your goatsbeards produce seeds? I have 2 plants and they are both male. I haven't introduced them to each other yet. Is your Angelica a biennial?

    rouge21_gw (CDN Z5b/6a) thanked Jay 6a Chicago
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