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Erden Carpets, is it worth the price?

20 days ago

We are in process of purchasing carpets for our newly
Remodeled home and our designer introduced us to Erden Carpets. All their carpets are beautiful, handmade and have nice metal designs accents/designs on them. I’ve been researching on the price for this Erden carpets but can’t find it anywhere, they are really pricey. If anyone has bough this carpet or at least know the price, I’m really curious and hopefully you can share this information. Our designer latterly has been gouging us on the price lately and this is why I have been shopping her prices around, we just don’t want to be taken advantages of.
Here’s their website: https://www.erdenusa.com
Thanks everyone in advance.

Comments (79)

  • PRO
    18 days ago
    last modified: 18 days ago

    People charge until they are so busy, they realize they are underselling their result, and then raise the price: )

    My paper hanger/painter makes me crazy. He puts ear buds in- gets lost in the work and his own head. There are days I think I should just let him live in the house he is doing. Cheap? No. Perfect? Yes. I. mean. perfect.

    It's the rule

    Nothing good is fast

    Nothing fast is good

    Nothing fast AND good is cheap.

    That last one is nearly impossible, is indeed fairly rare. Or?

    Price, quality, delivery...pick two.

  • 18 days ago
    last modified: 18 days ago

    Are you in LA by any chance? It sounds like you are working with the first designer I used! We had a contract, but her pricing was all smoke and mirrors. When confronted she literally made a comment about us having more money than her family. What the heck? Like we deserved to be overcharged. We had outstanding custom furniture orders, so we waited to finish those and then fired her. There were several other issues too, like blaming me when drapes came in and were done incorrectly. Paper trail of emails showed she had made the mistakes. My husband got involved towards the end and was amazed anyone could run a business like she did!

    I don't think your experience is that unusual, based on several similar posts we have had here over the years.

    I prefer to do my own designing, and I'm pretty good at it, so I was able to find a new designer, who worked more as a consultant and that worked really well. She is great designer, but more importantly an honest and straightforward person and very organized, so there was no fear that we weren't being billed fairly. You can ask any vendor we have worked with and they will tell you we are happy to pay their quoted rates and never haggle, but we expect honesty in the process.

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  • PRO
    18 days ago
    last modified: 18 days ago

    That's the point. Agree to price, and term and pay promptly. State terms, pricing, and then deliver "more" than you promised. Happy campers all around.

    Every fail is due to a failure in something just above, barring tornado. flood etc.: )

  • PRO
    18 days ago

    To answer McCarroll's question about designer discounts. I've been doing this for over 20 years and I've never heard that a designer is required to charge retail for fabric, wallpaper, rugs or furniture. Yes, the high-end appliance manufacturers don't allow discounting by the retailers. In my business, those items are purchased directly from the retailer by the client--I just specify.

    The agreement between client and designer regarding pricing, shipping, etc. is as varied as there are designers. The only factor of importance is the agreement between the two parties on the details. After the agreement is signed, both parties need to comply with the provisions. And the designer needs to be transparent and timely in procurement and billing.

  • 18 days ago

    Replying to Diana: Our designer always presents us with her bill whether we are buying tiles, wallpaper, furniture, etc. We have to pay everything through her vs paying each vendor directly. Like tiles, we went to a tile store but we had to pay our designer for our tiles. Same thing for our wallpaper. Is this the norm? If her contract with us says that she doesn’t mark up any materials or products she present us with then why can’t we just buy everything directly from the vendors she recommends? This is our second time using an interior designer but never had this type of experience from our previous one.

  • 18 days ago

    By what method is the interior designer being paid for her services. Is there a separate hourly rate? How in your contract does the designer make her fee?



  • PRO
    18 days ago

    Good question, Pal. If there's no mark up on products, then an hourly or flat fee would be the method.

    To the OP, I don't understand why she would bill you if she's not marking the items up, unless to collect the sales tax. But you need to ask her, not me about that.

  • 18 days ago

    Replying to Chispa: When you said, “It sounds like you are working with the first designer I used!” just goes to show that I’m not alone in my experience and it’s more common I guess.
    My other friend have also experienced the same scenario you and I went through (and I’m still going through) and she said that her designer persuaded her from buying her slabs from vendor A because her designer got a smaller percentage/commission so she brought her to Vendor B where her designer got a bigger commission. My friend just found out about this when she talked to Vendor A because she really wished she bought most of her slabs from Vendor A so she confronted Vendor A about their pricing - I guess her Designer was wanting more commission and when Vendor A refused her Designer took my friend to Vendor B. My friend could’ve gotten better quality slabs for a good price still but her Designer was so greedy and only focused on her commission which my friend had no knowledge that her Designer was actually getting a commissions from slab/stone dealers. She was purchasing marble slabs like OMG, etc. My friend’s agreement with her Designer was that they share in their trade discounts but her Designer tried to hide it from my friend.
    We’re in Newport Beach actually.

  • 18 days ago

    Replying to Diana: I’m asking you because you are also an Interior Designer. I was wondering if this is how Interior Designer’s bill their clients when purchasing their materials. Like literally we walked into a tile sore, picked our tiles but then we get billed by our interior designer for materials and not the store. We weren’t sure if this was the norm so I was asking nicely here.

  • 18 days ago
    last modified: 18 days ago

    My sister's designer recommended 2 expensive area rugs for her, in the $6-7000 each range. She pays her designer by the hour so no mark-up issues etc. She doesn't buy anything from or through the designer, just pays her directly for her advice.

    My sister balked at the price and wasn't interested in a "forever" investment carpet. So the designer found her other rugs for under $1000 each. Both $100% wool. Good looking.

    Just relaying my sister's experience. The expensive option is not the only one.

  • 18 days ago

    We pay our Designer by the hour as per her contract and we don’t even have any way of tracking or checking her billed hours, we just pay her on time every time. It’s an honor basis which is what we hope for from our designer along with transparency and honesty.

  • 18 days ago

    Wool carpets tend to shed, at least for awhile. For knitted garments, alpaca yarn tends to shed small bits of fiber, more than sheep's wool. I don't know how this affects is use as a carpet material.

    Seems odd to me, to use such an expensive fiber for a rug. I can't see that it would have any benefit over sheep's wool underfoot. And the bits of imbedded metal are not something that would attract me.

  • PRO
    18 days ago

    To Grateful AM, there's really no norm. Each designer has their own way of charging and billing. As I stated previously, whatever you agree to should be the way you are charged. And it should be transparent. If a designer charges by the hour, they should keep meticulous records of how many hours they spent on what tasks, and all that should be on the invoice.

  • 18 days ago
    last modified: 18 days ago

    Don't some designers earn their fee by a combination of hourly rate and cost-plus, where they are receiving a designer's net fee, which is less than retail, and then charging the client what they would pay retail, (or sometimes still less if they are getting an hourly fee?)

    If that is the case, one way to reduce the total design fee is to have a stricter budget for goods purchased. The designer is going to earn a higher total fee on fabric that is $1000/yd than they are on one that's $150/yd, with cost-plus. But the assumed risk on any project for the designer is going to be higher as cost of the overall project escalates. It's more risky to work with, and make a potential mistake with something that costs more. That's why they carry errors and omissions insurance, but if a designer say charges only an hourly rate, they could potentially earn less for a smaller project with lots of expensive finishes than they do for a big project with cheap finishes, despite the higher risk of the project with the more expensive finishes. To go back to wallcovering for a minute, if the selection, ordering and supervision of a wallpaper that costs $100 a roll takes the same number of hours as that of a wallcovering that is custom printed and costs $2000 a panel, should the designer get an identical fee for both projects?

    I don't have the complete answer for this, but it seems to me that the designer should make more for the project with the higher budget.

    The temptation for a certain type of designer would then be to pick the more expensive option all the time, but that's where setting a budget at the outset comes in.

    From the way you presented it, it seems that you could, if you so chose afford to spend $25K for the Erden rug if you thought you were getting value for it. If you weren't considering it at all, you wouldn't have asked the question. Maybe the discussion you need to have with your designer is that you don't want to spend this kind of money on every element and she has no choice but to show you reasonable less expensive options.

    --------

    I had the unique experience of meeting the people on each side of a design project when it was in progress, The client was wealthy, and the design firm was high end. The client had a flexible budget, and didn't really set very many parameters, but it was also very elastic in term of what he would be willing to spend on one thing vs another, which is tricky.

    The room that put some conflict into the relationship was the master bedroom. The client was enamored of a nineteenth century suite of furniture, which he bought, and the designers found a fireplace mantle, overmantel and paneled wall that went with it which he agreed to. So he spent several hundred thousand dollars (thirty years ago) without much consideration, these were things he wanted.

    His complaint to me was "Just because I bought this bed, and fireplace, now everything they are showing me i just incredibly expensive. $50K antique rugs, $5000 light fixtures--everything like it's the most expensive thing they can find."

    From the designers' standpoint, they felt he had set the bar for what should go in the room and house with the initial purchases, and felt that everything had to be at that level. From his standpoint, he spent a lot on those few things because they particularly appealed to him, but it was not important for everything to be at that level. And once he clarified that, the rest of the project went more smoothly.

  • 18 days ago
    last modified: 18 days ago

    I read almost all the comments. I kind of resent both ends of the criticism of the majority of people who post here (like me) just offering an opinion. There are folks who never heard of de Gournay. So what?

    There are folks who think Pottery Barn is an expensive store. So what?

    This is where the people choose to post their questions, and anyone who reads a whole bunch of threads can see where the responses are coming from: lots of different folks, but certainly skewed towards those who have worked with a BUDGET, whether large or small.

    If we all sat around and followed the thread to see who knew a lot about Erden carpets, the poor poster would never get a response, since no one here appears to be familiar with them. So now she/he is getting a range of responses which (seem to me) to be helpful anyways!

    We don't know if the poster is a multi-billionaire or just someone splurging their kids' inheritance.

    And, it doesn't matter, because she/he asked about budget. So we can assume the price matters here.

    As for me, I wouldn't put down carpet with metal in it, because rich or poor, carpets eventually (most would believe) need to be shampooed, and I think the metals might rust. So, I come from a practical place, where I wouldn't want metal on my bare feet, nor rust in my carpets, no matter the price or fanciness, or my ability to replace it on my income.....because even replacing carpet is bothersome and annoying no matter your budget.

  • 18 days ago
    last modified: 18 days ago

    Well one thing the OP definitely did not ask for was whether anybody else wanted a rug with metal inserts, or if they thought it was a bad idea. (?)

  • 18 days ago

    But isn't that one of the great features of Houzz--that other posters spot issues you didn't even think of? I've changed course on projects when I got answers to questions I didn't ask. In fact I owe my current living room layout to posters who chimed in on furniture placement when I was only asking about a rug.

  • 18 days ago

    In response to Palimpsest: “His complaint to me was "Just because I bought this bed, and fireplace, now everything they are showing me is just incredibly expensive. $50K antique rugs, $5000 light fixtures--everything like it's the most expensive thing they can find."
    From the designers' standpoint, they felt he had set the bar for what should go in the room and house with the initial purchases, and felt that everything had to be at that level.”

    This is exactly how we feel with our Designer!
    On the client’s standpoint, we feel that the Designer takes every chance that they get to show us the most expensive every time, one purchase after another…..or has an item or service become so expensive because it was only marked up so much by our Designer even though it didn’t have to be that expensive in the first place….plus you throw into the mix that you have proven incidents that your Designer has actually over charged you for some items and services.
    Sometimes Designers don’t keep in mind that everything add ups to the Client regardless of their budget and financial status in life. Even the rich and wealthy clients don’t want to be taken advantage of even though they have the money, it’s just human nature. Integrity and honesty in every business is just as important as talent and skills.
    The metal pieces on this carpet is actually gorgeous and they’re removable.
    I was merely trying get an idea of the prices she’s charging us if it was normal and reasonable for these types of Alpaca carpets. Cost matters to us because of the experience we had with our Designer over charging us for things and not because of any other reason. We simply don’t want to be taken advantage of and be overcharged again especially if the true cost of the carpet could be actually less and this is why I am asking this question in this forum, hoping there were people here who have actually bought this specific brand of carpet and what were their thoughts on it.

  • PRO
    18 days ago
    last modified: 18 days ago

    I scrolled the whole thread , and it still comes down to this:

    Art/talent, skill, experience, how MUCH experience, are commodities with a value and deserving of reward.

    Time. Time is money, but with a caveat. That which may take a homeowner hours or days to search, find, decide may take a designer an hour, a split minute or certainly a fraction of the time it would take a client. Does anyone judge a Picasso and ask how long it took to create a drawing, a painting? An hour? A month?

    The designer assigns a value to this concept, and that is her fee. A client decides if the fee is acceptable to them.

    Fee structures that don't yield commensurate results? This, we usually call "business F.A.I.L" or extremely short lived.

    Wholesale pricing exists for a reason. Profit. You don't enter a grocery, and demand to know what said venue paid for the lettuce, the tomatoes or the veal you decided to serve company. You pay more for the pretty prepared package of anything! Yet many feel in some way entitled to know exactly what the designer paid for anything and everything. You are not entitled to this information, despite some designers may share it.

    Design is far, far more than sourcing, procuring.

    Whether a designer shares discounts to any degree, how much, little, some, or all - will vary by designer. Whether a fee is hours, or profit on goods and an hourly, or by room, or by some weird sq. foot concept? This is the business of the designer., and nobody else. You are the decider if it works for you. The "how much" of her fee is her business, not yours.

    Hire someone you trust, and trust whomever you hired. If you can not do so, keep shopping.

    Should disappointment rear its head? Cut the cord.

    You are not being "taken advantage of" when a trade plied on your behalf yields profit to that trade, when you are billed for hours, or merchandise above wholesale pricing, or both of these combined ......UNLESS you were informed via contract of something else.

    Whether rug or rump roast.....do you want it, and do you want to pay for it? : )

  • PRO
    17 days ago

    I am still unclear as to what the billing agreement is. I know that Grateful AM stated that the designer charges an hourly rate, but is there no provision for a markup on products? If the contract specifically spells out that the client pays an hourly rate and designer cost for products, AND the client knows that the designer is charging a markup as well, then yes, the client is being overcharged and taken advantage of. The designer is not being truthful or ethical, and she is the one breaching the terms of the contract.

    If on the other hand, the contract allows for both an hourly rate and a markup, then you are not being taken advantage of. In either case communication between the designer and client is not good, and I will say again that you need to have a conversation about this. If you are not happy, then please terminate this relationship and find someone whom you can trust.

  • PRO
    17 days ago
    last modified: 17 days ago

    But then there is this : )

    "I was wondering if this is how Interior Designer’s bill their clients when purchasing their materials. Like literally we walked into a tile sore, picked our tiles but then we get billed by our interior designer for materials and not the store. We weren’t sure if this was the norm so I was asking nicely here."

    Where is your contract?

    The designer clearly has an existing account with the tile source. Does this mean she is the "bad guy"? Does it mean her pricing is less than yours would be? Probably.

    What you want to know by asking the question is this: Did the designer profit on the tile, if her contract specifically stated she would NOT profit on the tile.

    Where is the contract?

    We'll assume you paid her for the tile. If you had a question as to why you were paying her vs the store, why would you not ask for clarification in the moment?

    We'll assume you liked the tile well enough to approve and pay.

    I can't understand why you would ask the question, long after you have paid. Agreement to the material and the price is implied with payment, even if such payment resulted in profit for said designer. If you disagree ? Stop agreeing.

  • 17 days ago
    last modified: 17 days ago

    Design is far, far more than sourcing, procuring.

    But I think to some extent, it has become little more than this, this is all some clients seem to want, and it's about the level of service that some designers seem to provide.

    I read lots of threads (and there was something to this effect in this thread too) "We went to the tile store/flooring place/wherever and picked out______" and we still have to purchase it through our designer.

    No wonder people don't want to pay designers anything. Why are the clients going places and looking at everything and then picking out things? If they are doing that what do they need the designer for, other than procuring whatever they can't buy in a retail setting?

    Part of it has been that everybody has access to everything on the internet, at least visually.

    I have all the samples of things the interior decorator picked out for my parents when they build their house. Based on whatever interview process and charette my parents did with her, she presented ONE complete scheme for each room in the house. She did the furniture plan like Jan does, there was a list or a tear sheet or a photo of each piece of furniture , and cuttings of fabric and carpet or wallcovering. There were Polaroids of lamps and such the decorator found in Manhattan, even though she was based in Pittsburgh and my parents lived in the middle of nowhere.

    And if my parents did not like a particular fabric or wallcovering or piece of furniture, she found a replacement for it.

    She did not take them around to showrooms and let them look at every single thing they had in the store, and then pick out whatever they wanted it was her job to narrow it down. There were a few exceptions: when they were looking at Persian rugs, they did go through the process of flipping the entire pile of rugs, and the decorator did take them to a gallery to look at some paintings and in that case they saw everything that was there, because that's how those work. (But she sent photos of the paintings she thought they would like first)

    My parents did subsequently work with a couple others when this woman retired, and things needed to be refreshed, who would bring entire sample books (especially of wallpaper) and let my mom page through them, but again she didn't bring every single thing she had, she selected options.

    I know it was a different world back then. I think design still works this way at the top end of the market. Clients who are too busy to do it themselves, clients who are used to hiring people for certain tasks. They may still be getting exactly what they want, and it's still their taste, but they are letting an expert not only facilitate, but they also realize they are getting a better result than they could get if they did it all by themselves. I think that concept has been lost too, I hear people say "Why would I use an interior designer? It's not my taste then, who wants that?" That's not really how the process is supposed to work.

  • 17 days ago
    last modified: 17 days ago

    And my parents were not "wealthy". They were interested in once and done. They weren't fickle, they didn't get tired of things. Of course you repaint and reupholster or get new rugs if things wear out. But actually with a few exceptions, our family has every piece of furniture that was put in that house, as well as the persian rugs and artwork, and even then a couple of tables and chairs that were sold, someone in the family regretted not keeping it. A good portion of my furniture was their furniture.

  • PRO
    17 days ago
    last modified: 17 days ago

    Re access to a planet full of goods and "sourcing" ( essentially ) the why this and not that? The narrowing of that planet to something a lot more manageable. Plucked especially for you from what is nearly infinite.

    @Palimsest:

    "I think design still works this way at the top end of the market."

    In my world? It ALWAYS works that way. Resources are irrelevant. It first considers what a client owns. What do we still love, what are we keeping? What can go elsewhere, What must leave. The totally empty kettle scenario is a myth!! 99% of the time. Weeding and pruning are just as common and equally necessary. Wise Reinvention is considered.

    All of this must fit in a floor plan that may well get jiggled. There is a domino effect ! . Change one thing, and set two other changes in motion. It is the why of one selection, not another. WHY one thing is better than another.

    I will look at something, and there is always a secondary question. " When/if I return to this home in any amount of time......will I still love this?"

    You are buying a designers brain. Her taste. Her ability to interpret YOUR taste and kick it! You are renting that space in her head for the duration of the project, and in many cases long after.

    You are tasking her with the responsibility for outcome, and with at least some degree of fiduciary responsibility. Think of her as your marital counselor, ( wah ) shrink, space planner, financial advisor, and sometimes good pal of the moment. Your sounding board.

    Thus I will ask (and we shall assume you are jump up and down happy at finish, that it feels so good you FORGET you paid and joyfully announce "OMG ..it's like CHRISTMAS!!" as the install is complete.

    WTH do you think you should pay? ! ?!

    Sign me curious. Really, really curious: ) because if it is not yet clear? It is more than "sourcing". A lot more.

  • 17 days ago

    Jan, that is great that you believe you are an honest designer in the way you treat and bill your clients.

    The problem arises when the client realizes that they are being used as a "cash cow" for the duration of the project(s). The realization can come from actions by the designer, errors by the designer and from outside sources. For me it was a combination of those. The contract was an hourly rate and wholesale cost of products plus 20%.

    She had no accountability on the hours billed and I paid thousands of dollar for months with no idea what she was doing with the time. A rough break down was all we wanted and the space/products she was spending time on.

    For products I found out what the wholesale cost was on some items and she was adding on a much higher percentage than that on the contract. So, were we overcharged for every item we ordered? All smoke and mirrors. It seems her rationalization was that we could afford more, so she charged us more!

    When we called her out on it, she tried to send us another contract to sign that said she could charge us whatever percentage she wanted on products. Yeah, sure! I didn't sign that "revised" contract! She was all about getting as much money out of a client as she could.


    The other designer I used was the complete opposite. She showed invoices plus the agreed on markup and broke out her hours into categories, so you knew exactly what you were being billed for. Nothing was hidden. She was all about collaborating with a client to produce the best space. Unfortunately we moved states so I couldn't continue to use her.


    Just like in any business, there are bad/unethical designers out there. Of course, the bad experiences are the ones that get people to post on forums asking for advice.


    @Grateful AM, let me know if you want the name of my second designer. She might travel down to NB.

  • 17 days ago

    In my world? It ALWAYS works that way. Resources are irrelevant.


    I think in my (limited) experience why it does not has to do with the free access to the goods, (retail).

    I had a client who was doing a clean slate (downsizing from Victorian to apartment) who had a decent budget and we decided Room and Board was a decent option. with some fill=in stuff from other sources for variety. I specified specific pieces, he approved them, and then he wanted to take a trip to Manhattan to see things in person before pulling the trigger. This is fine.

    He brought along another guy I was doing work for (not my idea) , I was actually bartering services with, no budget at all to speak of, IKEA was going to be most of it but the house was 400 sq ft, planning was key and the guy had ADHD. I let me pick all the IKEA stuff, we started with an office, and he really couldn't handle the IKEA store. Then we were doing LR. I had shown him a specific sofa from R&B that I thought he could afford and would be better than IKEA.

    So we are in Room and Board, and we go through looking systematically at the pieces Clean Slate had already approved, and checking out some other stuff.

    And ADHD was looking at the stuff Clean Slate was buying and saying "You never showed Me this! You never showed Me that!" Like I wasn't doing as good a job for him. And I hadn't shown him this or that because it was too big or too expensive. "How about this sofa?" I said "Go in the men's room. Do you think this sofa will fit in the men's room? Thats how much floor space you have" "It is not my house is twice that big." "And it has stairs and a kitchen in it and you need a table." "What about this lamp? This is cool you never showed me this lamp, didn't you see it? I would love this" "I know" I said "But costs $3000. that's why I didn't show you"

    So ADHD is annoyed with me, Clean Slate orders the furniture, agrees with the fabrics and such I picked out.

    Then when I get there and there is the delivery, there is also a bunch of office furniture. "What's this?" "Oh I liked Room and Board and I saw this while you were looking at something with ADHD and then I called up and ordered it later." Oh, well...it should really be turned the other way" "Yeah I thought so too, but it doesn't fit, I forgot about the door"

    Besides that, it was impractical for his needs, was low in the storage department, pretty much my least favorite series they offered, but I was stuck with it.

    I had another former client, who we did the Room and Board thing contact me recently because she moved, I went and saw the new place, but before I even measured, she saw some bedroom furniture she liked and she ordered it. Did she verify it would actually fit? Nope.


    Obviously my work is much more casual than yours but the point is that they have access to everything on their own because none of it is sourced from to the trade. They only time I really control it is when it's something too tedious for them to navigate themselves.




  • 17 days ago

    Replying to Chispa: I’m really so glad that I’m not alone in this experience and sentiment! A whole can of worms got opened up by my simple question about Alpaca carpets and Erden Carpets. Appreciate you sharing the good and bad experience you’ve had with your first and second interior designer. Just like in any trade there are the honest and dishonest people and like you said we only share our experiences on forums when we’ve had real negative experiences (based on facts and not on rants) and are seeking help and guidance from others.
    I also forgot to mention that every time we order our materials from our designer, she orders 300% more material of what we’ll need meaning we have 2-3x the amount of overage of materials we needed to do the project. I said why? She says that it’s the overage and it’s industry standard but it’s so absurd to end up with too much material that will cover the same project or space 2-3x over. This became more evident when we ordered the tiles and wallpaper from her. I was livid of course and she said we needed the extra materials anyway just in case something happens! Really?!? Same thing with our slabs, she wanted us to order extra onyx slabs but when I did the calculation we just had enough onyx and I was right.
    The experiences we’ve had with such bad and unethical designers are horrible, like you said they treat us like their “cash cow” for the duration of their projects….nobody wants to be treated like that especially if you’re an honest paying customer! Designers should be guiding their clients and be their advocates, that’s part of giving a great service to their clients.

    I don’t mind getting the info of your new interior designer, we actually we actually will have another project and a friend might need her services too. Appreciate it. So this is why honest and hard working Designers are rewarded with other projects and referrals, not the dishonest and unethical designers. Wish Designers would think long term and not short term looking at their clients as a one time big time cash cow transaction.
    Appreciate you Chispa!

  • 16 days ago

    Grateful, you are definitely not alone and you are correct, no one wants to feel that they are being used or treated unfairly, overcharged.


    $200 per sq yd does not seem to be an unusually high price for a hand weaved wool rug. Seems like it is what a willing buyer will pay a willing seller for this product.


    I do think that someone in the production chain is making an unfair profit. The average weaver in Nepal is paid $60 a month to create approximately 2 square yards of carpet that we sell at $200/ sq. ft. Alpacas are not that expensive to breed and feed, and the workers that are processing the wool are making no more than the weavers. I would guess that the full cost of creating the carpet is less then $10/sq ft. and $190 is the shared profit who are all living lifestyles far above those who are doing the actual work.


    Before purchasing any wool rug I would want to know that it was not made using child labor or indentured servants. Most industries have some sort of watchdog organization who is working toward bettering the lives of the 3rd world people who are being exploited. For the rug industry it looks like GoodWeave is the watchdog/certification program. https://goodweave.org/home.php



  • 11 days ago

    @Jan Moyer

    Must you be condescending when you said: “Why indeed?! SERIOUSLY WHY? More than once and your tolerance of this, makes you either stupid, or a glutton for punishment.”

    We let the incident go when it happened the first time with the tiles, slabs. For the wallpaper, she clearly said it won’t happen again. She said that the wallpaper installer gave her the measurements for all the qty of the wallpaper we needed and did all the measurements of the areas. With this, we trusted our Designer we proceeded to order them while fully trusting our Designer!!!
    And after we had too much excess of wall papers, she then blames the installer for the total qty ordered!!!!
    So JAN MOYER, please choose your words carefully and don’t be too quick to judge and be condescending! If just have to say this because of your comment, “Clients like us didn’t get to where we are right now if we were stupid as you call us!” It’s just that there are Designers who are just there to take advantage of their client’s trust and wallet! This is a learning process for us and won’t make the same mistake in our upcoming project!!! We are here to offer help and guidance to others in this forum and not be judgy and condescending!

  • 11 days ago

    Seems like the big question is budget as there's always amazing style and options that can cost a fortune vs. less expensive...if the designer doesn't have a realistic overall budget then you'll likely see items that are AMAZING that you'll of course LOVE but the costs will add up if you decide to move forward. The question of whether something is "worth" it is really more about your budget. A Ferrari may be "worth" it given it's legacy, style, performance and hand made exclusivity but it's not "worth" it to me because I don't choose to spend $300,000 on a car.


    that's the question for you really - how much are the items you're considering and when you add them all up to get an overall look per room / house etc - do you have that budget and then is it "worth" it to you - based on what you could spend the money on...(or save it for a future need)


    (that being said - the rugs look amazing!!! no idea how much they run....


  • PRO
    11 days ago

    I hope that you returned the excess wallpaper. Any unused/unopened wallpaper sold by any reputable firm is able to be returned. If it's part of an opened roll, then it was not excess, it was needed to finish the job.

  • PRO
    10 days ago
    last modified: 10 days ago

    Diana is correct regarding "left overs" in wallpaper. What you left out in your statement with regards to being taken advantage of? " The designer ordered the paper, on the recommended quantity from the eventual installer and his measurement of the space.

    I do exactly the same thing, with every wallpaper and any space.

    All paper hangers base their order on the way the paper is packaged, on cuts and repeats....and the walls of the room and how they will lay out that product.

    When you see multiple partially used rolls? Yes, that is indeed, the natural waste and outcome for that paper in the area it was being placed.

    A 25% restock fee for UN OPENED rolls is common. It is usually not worth the trouble, and best saved for a small "disaster".

    Communication between you, the installer, and the designer......might have answered your question, before you asked or stated that particular issue, here. It may only appear and be equally false..."that the paper was 200 -300% more than was needed" : )

  • 10 days ago

    You can have tons of partial rolls of wallpaper left over based upon the pattern match and how the rolls are supplied.

    I don't know that anyone supplies single rolls but a single roll is only 15 feet of paper and unless you have baseboard and crown moulding to take up the extra space, that's not even two drops of paper with a straight match or non-matching with an eight foot ceiling.

    You'll get three drops of paper out of a double roll (30 feet), if you have 8 or 9 foot ceilings, if it's a straight match.

    (Early in wallpaper manufacturing they did not have long rolls of paper just sheets, so early manufactured paper had horizontal seams, so maybe the original single roll had something to do with people seaming horizontally back then, something that no one would do now.0

    You can get longer rolls because of higher ceilings now, I think.

  • PRO
    10 days ago
    last modified: 10 days ago

    What palimpsest said^^^^

    In addition to whether it's a straight or half-drop match, the vertical repeat can necessitate much more paper. You'll use less paper with a solid, a grasscloth or vertical stripe (no vertical repeat) than a 30" vertical repeat. And if you're doing a mural, cha-ching.

  • PRO
    10 days ago

    Paper is most frequently sold and priced as a single roll, but you BUY it as packaged, meaning double roll or a bolt. Grass cloth is often sold in yards, with a minimum order for yards.

    Wide vinyl grass, ( 51 " width ala Phillip Jeffries ) will be different than a traditional 36 inch.

    There are no hard/fast rules, beyond your own space and the paper selection the repeat if any, drop or straight match, and all other factors.

  • 10 days ago
    last modified: 10 days ago

    Jan did you delete a reply? I thought I read another reply you made yesterday and in it you made a comment about a comment I had made. Something about issues with items I ordered not being the designer's fault?

    With that first designer I never ordered anything ... it was all custom and through the designer. One of the items that came wrong and the designer blamed me, were fully custom drapes with Schumacher fabric and trim. ALL ordered by her and done by her chosen workroom. Those drapes came back wrong not once, but twice, and she tried to charge me more hours and materials for her mistakes. Luckily I had learned by then to keep notes of everything and to confirm details by email. Presented everything to her and she finally accepted fault. It was exhausting and very off-putting dealing with the whole thing.

    We lived in the same town, so I never understood why she would act that way. A friend of mine who was very social in town, made sure to tell everyone she met not to use that designer after she saw me deal with all the issues.

  • 10 days ago

    @Chispa Jan Moyer seems to say things in this forum that are either belittling and condescending to Interior Designers Clients like ourselves! I mean we are here on this forum seeking advice and getting input from others who has knowledge or experience about certain items, products or services. We did not ask to be judged on or be called names and ridiculed by others….this type of behavior just reveals the type of person one truly is!
    For @Jan Moyer to call me Stupid, that is where I draw the line! I am sure @Chispa Jan Moyer also had some condescending comments about you that is why she deleted her comments or reply to you. She deleted her response to me when she called me “Stupid” but I did cut and paste her comment on one of my replies to her.
    Jan Moyer has been so aggressive and condescending on her comments towards us, who are Interior Designer Clients and she doesn’t even know us……so I wonder how she truly is then with her own clients and what she really says about them behind their backs!

  • 10 days ago

    I stop in to see posts from time to time but found out early that there are frequently belittling & hostile comments. the forum would be much better without this. I am amazed at the behavior & the willingness of supposed professionals to not call her out on this. She likely is a very insecure person that finds self worth in belittling others with the all caps yelling & poor advice.

  • 10 days ago

    She sees her aggressive comments as "telling it like it is." I doubt she'd ever delete them. You can flag abusive comments and they will be removed.

  • 10 days ago

    @Olychick Calling someone “Stupid” is an aggressive comment! Unless you don’t think so. Jan Moyer deleted her comment to me with this “Stupid” remark! I don’t consider calling someone “Stupid” is “ telling it like it is especially to people you don’t know from this forum. She has also deleted a comment she made to @Chispa because it was probably in the same line. Most of Jane Moyer’s comment on this thread was aggressive, belittling, aggressive, condescending and not really helpful! She likes to personally attack people when they are here on Houzz sincerely seeking other people’s help, guidance and opinion.

  • 10 days ago
    last modified: 10 days ago

    Grateful, you misread my post...I was totally agreeing with you!! Just saying she prides herself on her abusive behavior and people here tolerate it. You can flag it as abusive and it will disappear, as she probably won't ever delete it on her own.

  • 10 days ago

    @Shannon T
    Sometimes people relate price questions to budget but it’s not always like that. When someone asks the question, “Is this Item worth the price?” Or “Is this item worth it?”, it just means that.
    People want to know if they are getting their money’s worth for an item they have never heard of before nor purchased before. Most people are familiar with Ferrari and they will pay Ferrari price because they are already familiar with the brand that has a proven track record for quality, performance, etc. and it really is a luxury brand. Erden carpets I wasn’t familiar with and can’t find much about them online on any forums nor it had any reviews that is why I came here. It was just a simple question hoping someone in this forum was familiar with Erden carpets or other similar brands for that matter.
    Now just because something is priced at xxx amount doesn’t mean they are worth that xxx amount.

  • 10 days ago

    @Olychic Appreciate you clarifying your comment, I did misread your comment, I apologize. Jan Moyer got me all worked up with her aggressive and condescending comments!

  • 10 days ago
    last modified: 10 days ago

    Well, I think there is another thing that happens that people don't like to admit, but I think part of the negativity is that you are doing something that doesn't fall within the parameters of the "norm". This is clearly a rug that costs an awful lot, regardless of anything else. It could be the most perfect rug available (no one here knows) but people are going to be against it because it costs "too much", whatever too much might be. The same thing happens when people think your budget is too low, particularly in the kitchen forum, but I think there is a little more bias against higher end products being "not worth it, whether the people doing the talking could afford it or not. They are projecting the bias of "not worth it to them", to include "not worth it for anybody."

    There is a Lot of negativity about anything outside the norm, and sometimes not so subtle pressure to " conform or go away".

  • 10 days ago

    Palimpest agree. if you dont post a certain way or you dont ask questions perceived to be what is wanted then you get scolded & told to do it as expected. a simple question is not regarded as answerable unless you submit details of every facet of your room / home & color of your dog. sarcasm. i understand that if someone is seeking those things but not every question requires that response.i dont get it, if its somethimg one doesnt want to respond to then dont. or suggest in a professional & helpful manner. so many are so helpful & positive. i have learned from reading so many posts. but i fear asking the wrong question!

  • 10 days ago

    Yes, so many helpful and kind people on these forums, who can do so without rudeness, shaming, or demands. It can be done. Some just choose not to do it, yet choose to pontificate or bully and believe (and say) that the advice is free, so be grateful, even if I'm insulting you.

  • 10 days ago

    Well I think I pontificate a lot, because I strong opinions and always feel like I need to explain exactly why I have the opinion I have. So it probably annoys people. But I try to do it without being personally rude.

  • 10 days ago

    Everyone is free to voice their own opinion as long as we don’t resort to name calling or condescending comments and just be respectful and kind to others regardless of our status.

  • 10 days ago
    last modified: 10 days ago

    You do not pontificate, Pal. You are well informed with helpful advice and experience. I don't recall EVER seeing you be rude or bully or shame a poster. Some here believe they can shed their 'wisdom' and judgements about all aspects of some poster's lives, treating this forum as their own personal blog or something. Things not decor related or asked for by the posters.

  • 10 days ago

    “a simple question is not regarded as answerable unless you submit details of every facet of your room / home & color of your dog.”


    Gotta have the color of the dog.