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October/November 2023

jlhart76
3 months ago

Last week of October or first week of November, take your pick.
Ma Nature sent us a trick in the form cold drizzle, but the moisture is still a nice treat considering how dry we've been.

Comments (51)

  • Kim Reiss
    3 months ago

    Currently I believe I am over 5” for the week. Maybe closer to 8”. It is a wonderful muddy mess.

  • slowpoke_gardener
    3 months ago

    We are still getting rain, I think that we have gotten less than some of you, bet we are in good shape for now. I expect that the ponds are still low, but that is often the case for this time of the year.


    I doubt that I will cover anything. Daughter is coming over today, I hope she can pick the peppers and tomatoes. I would like to build a small hoop house, but I have been having so much trouble with my feet that I am not sure I would be able to care for it if I had one.


    I have some PVC pipe and 4 or 6 mil plastic, if my feet get better I may try to rig up a cover over the lettuce I planted a couple of days ago.


    I have a good supply of winter stuff planted, I hope to be able to keep it producing for a while, maybe even have some over winter.


    Jen, thanks for starting the thread, I get a lot of enjoyment reading about all the things the members are up to.


    My right foot got inflamed and swollen, I think from trying to use the spading fork in my hard soil. I still don't have all my sweet potatoes in the house, some are still out lying on the cold wet ground. This old man is going to have to cut back on the gardening, I am just not man enough to do the things that I would like to.

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  • hazelinok
    3 months ago
    last modified: 3 months ago

    Thanks, Jen. I finally looked at the garden yesterday and everything looked so perky despite the chill.

    There's always a bit of grief the day before the first frost. I quietly tell all the plants, 'thank you", and tell them how wonderful they are. I don't say it loudly because the neighbors already think I'm crazy.

    Anyway, they'll more-than-likely be dead tomorrow.

    I was able to pull all the peppers and heirloom tomatoes yesterday. Those in particular are especially hard to lose because they're really just starting to produce. But, it is the way of the seasons.

    The annoying part of it all, is after Wednesday, we're showing sunny days with highs in the 60s and 70s...and lows in the 40s and 50s.

    But....it's time.

    Right on target, Spotify started playing all the Persephone (and Hecate) songs. I've had one especially stuck in my head all day. I've paid my coin to Charon. I have crossed the river, Styx....

    We're not quite to the Persephone Days yet, tho.

    I worked today, came home and covered the broccoli in the hinged hoop. It probably would be okay. Also covered the lettuce, kale, cabbage in the hoop house. I had the cloths ready to go yesterday, so it was easy enough to cover it all.

    There's a bit of damage on plastic of the hoop house door. I tried to cover it with packing tape. Rick tried yesterday too, but the tape is having a difficult time sticking to the plastic because of the dampness, I think. It should hold for a few days, though.

    I neglected to get the succulents ready to bring indoors. They're in the shop now and hopefully will be okay.

    How do y'all prepare plants to bring indoors? I don't want to bring in critters.

    It's a great night to stay in and be cozy, but we have a thing to go to.

  • slowpoke_gardener
    3 months ago

    It is hard to predict what will happen here, but it looks like I might be able to squeak by without a frost tonight, but I expect a heavy one tomorrow night. I will try to pick some green tomatoes tomorrow. Daughter picked most of the peppers today, and a few tomatoes.


    I carried in almost all of the sweet potatoes. I have about 2 dozen bunching onions that I pulled about about 4-6 weeks ago when I was cleaning out the mineral tubs. I feel like I should cut the heads off the onions and replant them in the mineral tubs, I don't need the onions, but I hate to waste anything. Maybe my attitude is from hard times, but my times were much better than my parents and grandparents, maybe people have always felt that way.


    I am thing about cutting some of my greens back and spraying them, hoping I can get some new growth before winter. If the cold weather doesn't kill what is eating my greens, I wont have any by winter.

  • slowpoke_gardener
    3 months ago

    I am ready for summer again. My min/max shows that we got down to 35 last night, and up to 38 now, with a high of mid 40's today, and a low of around 26 tonight, anyway you slice it, tonight is going to be rough on my summer plants and I will have to harvest everything I want to save today, I just wish it would get a little warmer, I am a sissy.

  • hazelinok
    3 months ago

    Larry, it looks like beginning Thursday, nice, fall weather will come. It's unfortunate we have the frost in front of it, tho.

    Maybe you'll get nice weather at the end of the week too.


    The sun is out. So begins the dilemma with the hoop house. If it's closed up when it's cold but sunny, it gets too hot for the greens and brassicas. Do I open the door before work while it's still frosty OR vent. I normally chose to vent.


    I am hoping to do clean up this coming weekend. Pull the dead veggie plants, cut back the asparagus, stuff like that. And plant the garlic.

  • hazelinok
    3 months ago
    last modified: 3 months ago

    Everyone must be busy.

    I am happy to have the day off and decided to sit a bit before starting my chores...other than starting laundry. Laundry is half done already.

    The garden was mostly still alive yesterday afternoon. Damage on frost tender plants, but they weren't dead. However, I'm sure they are now. Last night/this morning was colder. I'm up to 35 at our house right now, so will be opening up the hoop house in a few minutes. Vented, it was 70 in there yesterday afternoon. Felt good.

    No gardening yesterday, but we made sure the shop cats' warming mats are working. And removed the auto waterers in the chicken pens. Those sure are nice, but I'm not sure how to use them with freezing temperatures. We decided to just remove them. I sanitized them and they are ready to be stored until April or so. They don't drink as much water in the winter anyway. And we probably won't be traveling much during those months. At least not in the near future. The auto waterers are good for when people are caring for your animals. One less thing for them to deal with.

    I'm beginning to plan for next year. Actually, I started that months ago. It's ridiculous, but it's how I am....and I had gut feelings that next summer will be busy. There will be things happening next summer that will prevent me from gardening as intensely as I have been. And, we are going to work on the bedrooms--paint, new floors, scraping popcorn ceilings this winter. My light shelf is in one of the bedrooms. I've already decided that eggplant, production tomatoes, and tomatillos are out. (I'm not starting those from seed anyways). Heirloom tomatoes and SunGold will be the only ones I start. And peppers--I've been making a list of pepper varieties I want to try next year. I'll start some roselle too. The cool season stuff--I'm not sure. It may be a wait and see thing. How much we can get done in January. I start brassicas in February and may have to buy plants if I want to grow those. Our projects lately haven't gone as planned, but maybe the bedrooms will be fine. There's no plumbing to deal with at least.

    Anyone else thinking ahead to next year's garden?

  • slowpoke_gardener
    3 months ago

    Well, we got out frost, my min/max shows that the low was 24*.


    I took 4 bags of vegges to daughter and grand daughter. daughter has already taken 2 or 3 bags home with her Sun. when she came over. Madge just does not feel like messing with the vegges, and does not like for me to mess with them. We both are losing our youth pretty fast, and Madge thinks that I need to do the things the things outside that she cant do. We have carried the sweet potatoes into the utility room, where I am cleaning and sorting then.


    I need to remove the dead plants from the garden if it warms up enough.


    Jennifer, I counted my garlic yesterday, and all but 13 of the 196 are up, the rest may never come up. The garlic is just some that I picked up at Twin City produce, I have no idea what it is. I like the taste of onions much better than garlic, but it is hard for me to keep any kind of onion, other than bunching or walking onions all year long. I went out to my mineral tubs by the garden, where I had pulled the bunching and walking onions about a month ago. I finished weeding the 2 tubs I had onions planted in, separated the onions and replanted the tubs. I had 34 ends of the onions left. I just removed the root end to replant and tossed the rest of the onion.


    I have never gone to this much trouble in the past, but I am trying to learn to be more self-sufficient. I should have learned more about self-sufficiency when I was younger, because it is much harder now.



  • Kim Reiss
    3 months ago

    Yes I am!!! I will only be doing winter sowing from now on so I am saving all the water jugs. My son is coming to help me rearrange the loft tomorrow so I can access all my seeds. Then I will package saved seeds and do a major inventory. I love looking at seed packages it gives me hope. I have been collecting cardboard at work. I will be cutting weeds back and putting cardboard in all my giant containers. I am hoping to have compost by spring to fill the pots. Y’all stay warm.

  • slowpoke_gardener
    3 months ago

    What a difference a day makes.



    My roselle before and after the frost, even my greens look worse than I expected. It was 24 degrees on the back porch, I expect is was about the same in my wildlife garden.


    The date on my camera is still a day off.

  • Kim Reiss
    3 months ago

    It always amazes me how a little cold weather takes out the garden

  • slowpoke_gardener
    3 months ago
    last modified: 3 months ago

    I need to get out and do a little work, but some of my joints get so inflamed, even doing small amounts of work. I can take a pain pill and work for most of the day, but then I have sore swollen joints to deal with for many days.

    The weather was cold again last night, down to 22*. I had planned to go pick more tomatoes and peppers, but with two night of 22, and 24 degrees, I would expect that I would have to cook them now, or soon.

    I have enjoyed trying (new to me things that our forefathers may have had to do in a hard-times environment ). I have been using peppers more, and enjoy the flavor, and plan on planting more next year.

    I have my RTV parked at the base of the handicap ramp with many of my gardening tools loaded in the back, and the thermometer is up to 47, it time to go see what I can do.

  • hazelinok
    3 months ago
    last modified: 3 months ago

    It's a late workday for me, so I'm still at work. I forgot to open/vent the hoop house this morning so hopefully everything didn't fry once the sun came up. I asked Tom to open it as soon as he got home.

    Many of my plants look about the same, Larry. Beautiful one day, dead the next. Grrrrr....frost!

    It's supposed to stay above freezing for awhile now. I won't get home in time to uncover things. It's already mostly dark right now.



    Kim, I thought you would appreciate this. I sure do.

  • slowpoke_gardener
    3 months ago

    Jennifer, I could spend the rest of my life trying to clean the things you listed and never get caught up, but I guess that is the purpose of the poster, right?

  • Kim Reiss
    3 months ago

    Jennifer that is great. My son and daughter-in-law came and helped me move things from the house to the shed. I finally have room in the shed for things. it’s a process though

  • slowpoke_gardener
    3 months ago

    Amy, or anyone else. I think that Amy addressed wild garlic at one time. I found what I think is wild garlic in my onion bed. It could possibly be where some corms of Elephant sprouted, because they were so deep in the soil. The small plants smelled and taste great. My mind is not at ease because I have heard that some plant that looks like garlic can kill you. I have not been able to find anything online that looks like this plant. Anyway I have replanted 20 of them, hoping to see what they grow into. I am looking forward to any advice.


    Thanks, Larry




    One reason I thought that they may have grown from Elephant garlic corms, is that they taste much better than regular garlic.


  • farmgardenerok
    3 months ago

    Jennifer I read your comment sbout the chicken waterers. I use the heated pet waterbowls, they have a thermostat that doesnt waste electrcity, they are easy to clean and the chickens drink more water since it isnt as cold. I have 10 hens and i fill it daily

  • HU-422368488
    3 months ago
    last modified: 3 months ago

    Larry , you might give the onion sets ( I'm talking "sets", the little bulbs , not "seed") a little more time. I planted my fall onion sets about a month ago while it was dry and a little hot still and they took a while to come up even with watering. But then they came right up after a good 2 in rain.

    Also the declining daylight will make things go slower in the fall along with the colder temps we had the past few days.

    In the spring , the daylight increases as the temps warm up and things grow faster.

    In the fall , it's the reverse and plants grow slower as the sun angle gets lower and temps go down.


    Rick

  • AmyinOwasso/zone 6b
    3 months ago

    Larry, I always heard the look-a-like onion/garlic called crows poison. I understand it doesn't SMELL like either.

    https://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=nobi2

  • farmgardenerok
    3 months ago

    Larry, your post about your dog reminds me of our last dog. We never had a dog that came in the house except one that was deaf snd she would come scratch on the door at night and walk thru the hall to the garage. Before anyone gets upset our dogs always had a closed in box with a soft pillow or blanket and it was inside a well insulated shop.

    Anyway- our last dog got to come inside in the summer and lie in front of a fan. He got overheated faster and more than any dog we ever owned. We didnt understand why. But he was a very loyal and protective partner - he worked the cows with us and saved my husband from getting hurt bad more than once.

    He would come in the hall on the tile but you couldn’t drag him in any further and he always wanted to sleep at night in the garage with another fan. One night he was asleep and I reached to wake him up and he bit me. We realized he was going blind and the vet said he was diabetic.

    For almost a year I gave him shots and he still went with us to do chores and work outside, but we had to keep him close or on a leash where he couldnt get hurt. All that background to say I put a heat light above his bed in the garage and he could feel the warmth and see just enough light to think he was lying in the sunshine outside and would stretch out and sleep.

    Sorry for the long non-garden post but you brought back a lot of memories

  • farmgardenerok
    3 months ago

    Most of my garden is gone except for a raised bed of collards and turnips and a tractor tire when I planted onion sets last Spring. Some of the sets never made onions big enough to pull so I just left them - this morning I cut off the green tops and had almost a quart of chopped green onions to freeze and use. I put straw around the bottoms and hope they keep growing to cut for awhile.We buy our feed at the mill in Stillwater - last week when we went I looked for some Austrian peas to plant in raised beds for a winter cover crop - the winter rye gets too big and tough for me to manage without a mower to cut it. I bought a pound of turnip seed to scatter where the cows can eat them later and I can get greens if i want. I also bought a handful of alfalfa seed thinking I could plant it in raised beds and cut the tops for the chickens. Anyone have experience with that or is it a crazy idea? Also bought several pounds of clover to plant in cowpies in the pasture. The manure gives a warm seedbed, it inoculates the seed, and the cows won’t eat it in the manure. I add more clover to our fields this way every year. Now that everything is frozen its a beautiful 68° and sunny outside. I need to get out and pull my periwinkles from the half barrels on the patio and get some pansies for the winter

  • slowpoke_gardener
    3 months ago

    Rick, I expect that you are right, I am a very impatient gardener.


    Amy, the ( proposed garlic ) definitely smells and taste like mild garlic. I will place a tag where I planted them so I can keep up with them. I am so bad to not place tags, and then forget what is growing in a spot.


    Farmgardener, I have tried alfalfa a time or two, but I did not have as good of luck with it as I do with clover. I try to keep clover seeds on hand to just toss in the bare spot along the tree line.


    I still have some brush hogging to do in the wildlife garden. I have 100+ roselle, sunflowers, and zinnias to chop up, and I expect that neighbor will have a bunch of plants that need to be chopped down. I have a lot of work to do on this place also, but I just keep falling behind.

  • hazelinok
    3 months ago

    Thanks for the waterer idea, farmgardenerok.

    I actually typed up a post on Thursday but wasn't feeling well and was dealing with a couple of issues, so forgot about it. I came back yesterday and the partial post was still up, but then I accidentally closed it. I can't remember what all I said.


    As expected, the okra, peppers, tomatoes, roselle, kajari melons, and some other things are gone. A few surprising things survived including some flowers like the Laura Bush petunias, calendula, and chamomile. Also a few things that were around the house.


    I uncovered the broccoli in the hinged hoop and the beds in the hoop house on Thursday afternoon. The beds in the hoop house were really dry so they got a deep watering.


    Rick uncovered things in the SG last night but I wasn't home. I'll check it all out today.


    Garden work really should be the main project today, but I feel like doing indoor work. However, I will go outside and do some clean up whether I feel like it or not. We must take advantage of these nice days.

    I'll chop down the asparagus, pull out the tomatoes and peppers in the kitchen garden, remove melon and cuke vines. I'm wondering if the raised beds could use some water. There's bunching turnips, golden beets, carrots, radishes, swiss chard and collards still in the KG...as well as, herbs and the broccoli in the hinged hoop. I should go ahead and plant those beauty berries too. I wish I knew the best spot, but I'm just gonna have to risk it and do it. I'm going to keep the fig in the pot and move it to the shop in a month or so.


    Oklahoma Gardening on PBS just came on, so I'll see if it's worth watching and then head outdoors.

    Hope everyone can enjoy the nice day.

  • Kim Reiss
    3 months ago

    I can’t start a new thread. My spinach came up and died. Not sure what I did wrong. It is beautiful and warm here.

  • slowpoke_gardener
    3 months ago

    Kim, I dont have any luck starting a new thread either. I just came in from checking my young collards and mustard, they don't look so good either. I think that a lot of plants have to get up and toughen up for a while to withstand a quick freeze. Nearly all of my fall planting is showing a lot of damage.


    I mowed a row of turnips to see if I could cut the damaged leaves off and get some light in to the growing tip hoping I could buy enough time to get the plants to go ahead and produce a few turnips before we have another hard freeze. I expect to have very little success on my mowing project, but I still have an un-mowed row, which might produce something. I did pick a few turnips after I mowed the row, and picked up some sweet potatoes that was still lying in the garden. I plan on making a dish with sweet potatoes and turnips just as an experiment. I will do this while Madge is gone so she wont chase me out of the kitchen.


    I brush hogged a couple of spots to make a place to plant something green for the wildlife. Its a little late, but maybe I can get some rye grass, or grain rye to come up. I did not mow down all the summer plot because there was a bunch of very small birds calling that home now.

  • hazelinok
    3 months ago

    Maybe we can keep using this thread for another week since it's already Tuesday?


    Kim, spinach can be so finicky. So far, the ones I have in a container in the hoop house are doing fine. Rick has some in the SG that are okay too. Or they were last time I checked. He kept that bed covered with shade cloth until a couple of weeks ago. I also covered the spinach container in the hoop house with shade cloth.

    Some years, I have success with it and some years I don't. If you have seed, maybe try it now that it's cooled down (well, it's hot again but will cool down in a couple of days). Even if the plants stay small, but alive, it might start to grow in February. If you can keep them alive.


    We finally have pecans that aren't infested with weevils. When we bought this property I was especially excited to see a pecan tree on it. But, we've never had edible pecans. Years ago I talked to a arborist and he suggested that we treat it once non organically, and then put some organic practices into place. Well, we never did that until this year and it is paying off. I hate spraying things, but I also hate not getting any nuts from my pecan tree.


    The kitchen garden is mostly cleaned up. I pulled cages and dead plants for hours on Saturday. Tom helped me store them away. It feels good to get that done. Only the asparagus remains. It's still green, tho, so no hurry.

    Trying to think ahead for 2024. It's going to be a busy year so putting things in place now to make it easier then, will be helpful. Getting organized and all. Not just throwing shade cloths and frost cloths and tools into a pile but taking the time to fold and store--stuff like that. And getting rid of things that are taking up space but aren't useful. There's still quite a bit to do in the shop. I have a corner of garden related stuff that needs to be sorted through. The jars for canning are on a certain shelf and I've already organized those according to size and if they are true mason jars. The lids and rings are in tubs according to sizes.

    I have a jar problem. It's so hard to recycle a good jar. Even if it doesn't fit regular or wide rings for canning purposes. Those are great for freezing broth...and many other things.


    It's nearly time to call for another big trash pick-up.


    Looks like watering will be a task very soon. I sure hope the forecast is wrong and we get some rain tomorrow. After tomorrow, the forecast is very dry for the next several days. There's not a lot to water now, though. It shouldn't take too long.


    At work, I have a couple of "mindless" tasks, so am able to listen to YouTube videos.

    Does anyone watch/follow The Seasonal Homestead? This year she stored her onions away from the apples and potatoes because everyone says that those things should not be stored together....even though she had done it for years. She has a cold room (SO nice) and put the apples and potatoes there. And stored her onions in another location at room temperature. Her onions are beginning to go bad (like mine, but I don't have a cold room option). She is going back to storing the onions WITH the apples and potatoes in the cold room because they last longer in the cold even though they're with the things they shouldn't be stored alongside.

    Things like that are interesting.

    A theme I've noticed lately--and maybe it's not a "theme". But, it has to do with being smaller. I've felt that this year--all year. And the latest R & R video is about that really. (I've been concerned about their situation for a couple of years just because they are really growing a lot, in a lot of different ways--it would be so hard to keep up with all of it). Anyway, then Meg from Hollar Homestead said something recently about how she was NOT canning a particular product this year because they didn't eat it often and they didn't need any of that particular item (can't remember the details). But the thing she said that stood out, is it's not being a good steward of your TIME if you're canning things that you won't eat or that you already have plenty of in storage. Good stewardship of your time....not just your money. Time is precious for sure.


    Those people are all 40 and younger--most aren't quite 40 yet. I've wished that we had all the information and support that is now available online WAY back when we were in our 20's. It was just not there. Our boomer (and the generation before) parents were moved away from that lifestyle by their parents--our grandparents. It's understandable. Our grandparents and greats, had to work so hard. Harder than modern homesteaders for sure. They just wanted better for their kids/grandkids.


    Anyway....I'm so rambling today. Like a lot of days.

    And some of the new pullets are flyers, so I need to go deal with that. And Roomba is stuck.

    AND I need to be a good steward of my time and get up and do something.


    (Rest too is productive. Nothing wrong with that)

  • AmyinOwasso/zone 6b
    3 months ago

    My brother was always a picky eater. He would eat spinach, because Popeye ate spinach. Ron cooked some collard greens, he didn't care for them. Ron cooked the frost bit chard, brother thought it was spinach. My point is, grow chard, it tolerates heat and long days better than spinach. I think some varieties are pretty hardy as well. Also, Komatsuna (tendergreen Mustard) is a good spring and summer substitute. One year, admittedly a mild winter, all my greens survived. I had collards, kale, chard, tatsoi. My romaine and spinach reseeded. Next year I planned a special bed with only red and purple plants. Kale, tatsoi, Red orach. It was so pretty. We had an early freeze and the only thing that survived was Scarlet Kale. Boy I loved that mild winter, we ate greens all winter, then the collard bolted with lots of little sprouts similar to broccoli but a milder taste.

    I have concluded that my Samsung keyboard conflicts with Firefox. It's been giving me trouble on other sites. Had to type this in another app.

    XOXO

  • AmyinOwasso/zone 6b
    3 months ago

    Testing different keyboard. Interesting. GBoard. It's too big in full size, but it can be made smaller. Still problems showing up. Oh well.

  • slowpoke_gardener
    3 months ago

    Jennifer, I enjoy your rambling. I feel that I learn a lot from you post.


    Kim, I often have problems with spinach. This is one of my better years.


    The spinach is the small row right in front of me, it seemed to have less damage than any of my other plants, except my garlic ( not in this garden ). The two far left rows (cant see because frost killed nearly all of them) are mustard and collards, they were smaller than the spinach.


    Here are some arugula and turnips in the south garden, you can see that the 22 and 24 degree frost bit them pretty hard.


    Amy, I enjoy your wisdom, you seem to have info on about anything.


    Rick, you were right about giving the onion sets a little time. Here is the last 50 sets I planted. These are ( new to me ) bunching onion that I bought at the co-op. I could not see a name on the box, but the guy at the co-op said that they were very productive. This is the first day I have seen them poking through the soil, they are very small.



    My other onion sets are coming up also, but not very well, they were planted a week of two before these.

  • Kim Reiss
    3 months ago

    Jennifer I look forward to your rambly posts. I don’t always comment but I always enjoy them : ) have you seen R&R new channel? It’s kitchen stuff. It’s going to be lovely. The farmers table. I love all the greens for cooking but spinach for salads. Since Dr wants me eating 7 cups of cruciferous veg per day I thought spinach salads would be good. I only shop every 2 or 3 weeks so store bought doesn’t really work. Larry I say it again I wish we were neighbors. I could steal one leaf off each plant ha ha.

  • HU-422368488
    3 months ago
    last modified: 3 months ago

    Larry , that spinach is sure lookin good.

    I tried half a dozen times over to get spinach going over east. , but the grasshoppers and heat would do it in every time it came up. same with turnips , mustard , kale , chard , collards by seed. If it wasn't for having spring planted collards survive the heat I wouldn't have any collards for the winter at all.

    Finally got a short row of spinach up and 3 or 4 turnip patches. Got fall onions up and garlic is coming up. My elephant garlic from last year is volunteering up too. I'll try to get pics of it all later.


    I had better luck with fall planting over at Jennifers. Grasshoppers weren't as bad there.

    got a little spinach going there along with a lot of other things.

    I covered it all for the hard freeze we had and that helped a lot. Even the green beans survived this time.

    There's already been pics of it posted.




    Glad you're onions are coming up. I knew they would.


    Rick

  • slowpoke_gardener
    3 months ago

    Rick, those plants sure look good. I would like to build a frame like you have. I would have to start out small because I am not sure I could cover it, or if I would be able to get in it. Getting old sure has its draw backs.

  • HU-422368488
    3 months ago

    Yep , those low tunnel are a lot of work..

    Hope you make it threw the winter.

    as long as you got turnips and greens , you'll be alright.

  • hazelinok
    3 months ago

    Kim, I just saw the new channel. Haven't had time to watch it yet.

    Do your veggies need to be raw or can they be cooked?

  • AmyinOwasso/zone 6b
    3 months ago

    Larry, I don't think I'm wise, but I'm a good researcher. Many days have been lost down the Google rabbit hole.

    Facebook showed me memories of the purple garden today. I remember pictures didn't do it justice. I tried to put them here, but the whole post was lost. I will submit this and try again.

  • AmyinOwasso/zone 6b
    3 months ago


    Pac choi there were 2, probably purple pac choi.

  • AmyinOwasso/zone 6b
    3 months ago
    last modified: 3 months ago


    The pink plant on the left is red orach, it's like lambs quarter, 2 kinds of pac choi, scarletkale was in the middle of the bed, and maybe red Russian kale.

  • AmyinOwasso/zone 6b
    3 months ago


    The collard seed buds we ate like broccoli.

  • slowpoke_gardener
    3 months ago

    Amy, what ever you are, I sure enjoy you post. I also want to experiment with some of the plants you talk about, if In am not mistaken you have mentioned Kitazawa seed company quite often, and it looks like they have a good selection of seeds. I buy most of my seeds from the Farmers Co-op because I can get seeds pretty cheap there, but the selection is not great.


    I have mustard tender greens growing now, my aunt and uncle like them, so I planted the greens for them.


    Madge and I are going to have greens for lunch. We picked a mixture of curly mustard, turnip greens, arugula, and what ever Madge picked out of the pasture garden. I also pulled a bunch of bunching onion, there were 10 in the bunch. I cut off the stumps and replanted them. I then cleaned the onions good, removing any part that Madge might have trouble chewing and placed them, along with two garlic cloves in the greens, we are ready to eat now, I hope we survive.


  • Kim Reiss
    3 months ago

    Jennifer mostly raw or lightly steamed

  • Kim Reiss
    3 months ago

    I think I am going to rework my little in ground space 3’x10’ and put my hoops in place to cover. I have lots of agribon to use. I have rabbit manure to give the soil a little boost.

  • AmyinOwasso/zone 6b
    3 months ago

    Yes, I like Kitazawa. They've always been pretty generous with most seeds and give you ful info about the variety. They aren't cheap, however. They have a huge variety though. Pine Tree Seeds, does fewer seeds for lower price and they have quite a few asian vegetables. I got misome from them years ago, and liked it. I've never worked it out, I expect you get more for your money at Kitazawa. When I first bought from Pine Tree the average packet was 1.50. You could try a lot more things that way.

  • slowpoke_gardener
    3 months ago

    I gave my pasture garden and the south garden a little boost yesterday, now its raining, this should help the fertilized soak into the soil. I don't have the natural stuff, so I just toss out the stuff from a bag. I used 13-13-13 on the pasture garden, and 32-0-0 on the south garden. The pasture garden is new this year and I thought it may be a little low on P and K. All of this is without a soil test. I have not had the organic matter to use this year, so I felt that the greens and onions could use a little nitrogen. I expect the cold will get them soon anyway.

  • hazelinok
    3 months ago
    last modified: 3 months ago

    Hi Friends. I don't really have much gardening to talk about. I do need to water again tomorrow. It's getting pretty dry.

    I've been enjoying garden food. Garden salads are always a treat especially picked fresh every morning. Currently, the salads are different lettuces, baby kale, arugula, turnips, radishes, tomatoes that have turned red on the counter, and peppers that were picked before the frost.

    We used this year's sweet potatoes for the first time in a recipe. I'll see if I can find it and link it here. It's a Mexican casserole. We really enjoyed it. Taco Casserole with Sweet Potatoes

    Other garden foods you can use in the recipe are onions, bell peppers, and diced tomatoes (if you canned any). And eggs if you have chickens. It's amazing how the egg, mayo and salsa combo makes a cheese-like topping.

    Anyway...

    We're foodies for sure.

    On Wednesday I watered the hoop house and noticed movement. It was a monarch butterfly with its wings folded. Did it just come out of the chrysalis or is it deformed? I closed up the hoop house that night and opened it yesterday morning. The wings were still folded. My nectar plants froze last week. The only things that are in bloom are calendula and roses. Then I remembered a pot of scarlet sage that I had against the back of the house that didn't freeze. So, I carried that pot to the hoop house and put the butterfly on it. She seemed to appreciate it. I checked on her this morning and she is gone. Either her wings unfolded and she flew away, or a predator got her.

    Can't remember if I mentioned that I planted the beauty berries. They're at the back of the property. There's a mulberry tree back there, although it doesn't produce berries. (another one, about an acre away does, tho). Anyway....I put both bushes back there. They'll get partial shade at least. They're near where I planted the wild violets. Where our cat, Charlotte, is buried.

    I hope they survive.

    Tom is probably secretly annoyed by all the random things I plant around the property which messes up mowing in straight rows. He did mow over the wild violets once this summer, but they're okay.

    I put a big clump of dead/dried gaillardia in the far north east of the property. Hoping it seeds there. Something else for him to mow around. Already he has to mow around the Indian Paintbrushes. certain clumps of yarrow and now goldenrod just showed up this year. Not to mention the elderberries scattered around the property. And some other things.

    I really don't like an empty field much. I want trees, bushes, and wild flowers.

    One of the young pullets got out again this morning. It's the same one, so I caught her and clipped her wing feathers. Hopefully that will work. She's a flightly, unfriendly little thing. She was supposed to be an Easter Egger, but she is no Easter Egger. Or not like any I've ever seen before. Dang Atwoods has gotten me several times with mislabeled chicks.

    What else? Hmmm....oh, I put a bit of chicken droppings and some soil acidifier around the berry bushes on the backside of the property. I still need to do the the others. I did that last year and really think it helped. The gogi berry is producing well for the first time ever.

    It's time to get some work done.

  • slowpoke_gardener
    3 months ago

    Jennifer, thanks for the recipe. I will run that by Madge and see if we are brave enough to try it. We are trying to branch out a little, but when you have eaten cornbread and beans for 80 years, you forget how to eat anything else.


    We went out to eat in Fort Smith again today. Of course I had to go by the Co-op, and bought 468 onion sets. I know that every one says to use sets for green onions, and the little plants for the bulbing onions, but last year onions plants were selling for $6.00 a bundle, so I will buy less bundles this year and try to get more use out of the sets. I also found another type of garlic at Twin City Produce, so I bought a couple of heads of the garlic. I don't know what kind of garlic it is, but it has a much larger clove. The cloves look closer to the size of Elephant garlic, the two heads gave me 18 cloves. As of now I have more onions and garlic than I can use, I have 204 cloves of the first bunch of garlic I plant, and almost all of it is up but it ain't harvested yet, a lot can happen between now and next June.


    It is really too wet to do anything in the garden, but hopefully tomorrow I can make another bed for some onions. Fifty three sets looked like they will not last long so I will plant them soon. The weather is cool enough and the days are short enough that I cant get much of anything to come up.


    While in Ft. Smith I bought two more light to add to the grow shelf if I need to. I don't want to spend as much time in neighbors greenhouse next year. I have more to do around here than I can get done.

  • Kim Reiss
    3 months ago

    Well I worked outside pretty hard for over 4 hours. I locked up the motor on my little weedeater. It was a small electric one and I pushed it a little too hard. I got the bed cleaned out, orange oil applied to scare off all the ants, pots of putting soil dumped in, rabbit manure applied and now trying to decide what next.

  • slowpoke_gardener
    3 months ago

    Kim, sounds like you are making progress. It was a nice day here. I went to the south garden, and to the pasture garden to try to do a little work. The pasture garden, being new and not well drained was too wet for any work. The south garden drains well but was still to wet to do much. I replanted some walking onions that had walked out of the garden, I still have a few more to go, but I need to find some room. It was too wet to till more space to plant onions.


    I looked online for onion seeds, but the onions I wanted were sold out. I was wanting to start some bulbing onion, I have started them from seed before and had pretty good luck, but it seems to take a lot of work and a lot of time. I guess the big thing is that I am bored, the weather is nice, but still too wet to do anything. Maybe tomorrow I can make myself find something to do, there is always something to do if I can just make myself do it.

  • Kim Reiss
    3 months ago

    I’m just trying to catch up to you Larry

  • slowpoke_gardener
    3 months ago

    Kim, if you are behind me, you are in sad shape.


    I did go out to the south garden and check on the plants. The 196 garlic bulbs that I had planted and it looked like about a dozen had not come up, well they are up now, but the extra that I planted to bring the count up to 204 are not up yet, but I expect they will be up within a couple of weeks. The bed of onions sets that I planted just north of the garlic has 125 plants up. I dont remember how many sets I planted, but I expect it was 150-175. The onion sets were not in as good of shape as the garlic, plus the onion sets seem to be slower to come up than the garlic. I only remember planting onion set one time before this year, and that was done in the spring, but I thought if garlic could handle the winter, onions could also. My walking and bunching onions seem to want to live for ever.


    The gardens are still a little too wet to work in them, so I will change my plans. I think this would be a good day to take some sweet potatoes and greens to my aunt and uncle. It will be a good day to brush hog also. Madge will be gone most of the day, her oldest daughter has had quadruple bypass and is still in the hospital, not doing as well as hoped.


    We I have sit here and rested long enough, time to tear something up.