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bathroom layout ideas please

10 months ago

Trying to remodel my 8’x8’2” bathroom in my 1950’s home . Totally demo’d my 1950 Cinderella corner tub shower and want a separate walk in shower and free standing tub. Does this layout look ok or would appreciate ideas . Would love to get a larger vanity but so far only room for 32” and larger walk in shower is a must. Already cut the tub size down to 54” but can’t how smaller. Thanks in advance to all you creatives out there

Comments (28)

  • 10 months ago

    do you really need a separate tub?


  • 10 months ago

    The room isn't large enough for a separate tub while also having enough room for a decent sized shower and vanity. Most people would choose to have the toilet across from where you're showing it, the shower next to it and then you have more room on the wall where the vanity is to make it bigger. I would have a single sink vanity with generous counter space rather than cramming two sinks in. However, it's your bath, your money, so if the separate tub is really important to you, just have it built-in. You don't have enough space to get around a freestanding tub to clean. And then if the tub is small enough to fit is it serving the purpose?

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  • PRO
    10 months ago

    I find a 60" tub too short and for sure 30" wide is the min alwyas. You also need 12" all arond the tub and even then you practically have to stand on your head in the tub to clean the wall behind it. I actully really dislike FS tubs they are a PITA to get in and out of IMO do nice big shower and a decent sized vanity and forget the tub or go nice deep soaker tub 66 x32/shower .

  • 10 months ago

    Can you change the door to open out?

  • 9 months ago

    I also would do either a large shower and a large vanity (no tub) or a tub-shower and a large vanity. You can even leave the toilet where you show it, use the space where you're showing the tub for shower, and put long vanity along the bottom wall. You could even build a linen closet where you planned on the vanity, for storage and a hint of privacy for the WC. Third possibility, get a smaller round soaking tub (usually have a bench for sitting, and you can get the water up to your neck) which would leave plenty of space for a shower. A 3-foot neo-angle is super not fun to shower in.


    Japanese Soaking Tub · More Info


    41" SIGLO ROUND JAPANESE SOAKING TUB · More Info


  • 9 months ago

    Omg thank you to everyone for your great comments and ideas - this is the master bath so I think for resale purposes we need some kind of tub. I haven’t considered the simple solution of the bathroom door opening out. This is potentially is a great solution to have everything fit in the bathroom - I like the round tub too! Yes must have a larger shower

  • 9 months ago

    If you have another tub in another bathroom, you would probably be better off with a double vanity for resale value. If you’re going to use it and absolutely must have a tub, fine. But many primary bathroom tubs rarely get used. There are other door options also. Barn doors come in many styles - doesn’t have to be rustic - and might also work.

  • 9 months ago

    Primary bath or not, I think your space is too small to cram in a separate tub and shower….you definitely need a larger vanity. If you can open your door to the outside, by all means, do it; we did that with a guest bath (the bedroom is huge but the en-suite bathroom on the small side) and it made a big difference. Good luck!

  • 9 months ago

    Great that you live in an older house. I know well the challenges that come with it!


    1. Do you have a tub anywhere else in your home? If so, you do not need another in here for resale. In fact, with a 32" sink and a 54" tub, most buyers would be turned off and think your bathroom would need to be gutted to take out the tub and get a bigger sink.


    2. Look on zillow at recently sold homes in your neighborhood of a similar age and size. What do their primary bathrooms look like?


    3. I just gutted a bathroom smaller than yours. I investigated 54" tubs and learned that most of them are made to go in mobile homes and are not great quality. I also tried to sit in one and it was totally uncomfortable. Those that are better quality are oddly tear dropped shaped and for kids to bathe in, not for an adult to soak in.


    4. We did an outward swinging door to our bathroom. It saved space. But, you need to look at the space your door would swing out into. Does it chop that space up, make any strange traffic, or swing into any closet doors?


    5. Homes built in the 1950s were not made to accommodate a separate tub and shower. If there is not a tub elsewhere in the house and you need to have one here, is there any form of tub shower combo that would be acceptable to you? Why do you want them to be separate?



  • 9 months ago

    So much to consider and I appreciate the wisdom of this group. We are getting older and starting to think about aging in place -lol, but not totally committed to staying in this house so also considering resale. I need to make some difficult choices before moving forward to rework our “plan”.

  • 9 months ago

    Everyone who is saying that having one tub anywhere else in the house gives you freedom to maximize the shower and vanity in the master. It will probably not affect resale. The biggest resale issue has always been market demand, which none of us can predict.

    Make the double vanity + massive walk-in shower FOR YOURSELF. Enjoy your own home and renovation investment.

  • 9 months ago

    If you can move your entry door to the middle of the bottom wall, you could put a nice double vanity on the left wall, a tub to the right and a toilet next to the window.

  • 9 months ago

    Good to know that you are considering the needs of aging in place. We designed our small bathroom with that in mind too. Having a larger a foot path reduces the risks of falls. Having a tight bathroom, where everything is crammed together is not as conducive to safe passage.


    We put really nice looking grab bars in the shower, they are beautiful and not at all evocative of a nursing home! Even though I don't need them, I find myself instinctively grabbing for them anyway. We didn't want a grab bar at the toilet yet. However, we had blocking put in the wall for them to be installed in the future. If you don't want grab bars at all, I'd still put blocking in the shower and toilet area for them.


    I'd also consider getting a high sitting toilet (they seem to be the norm now), and a taller vanity (also becoming the norm). Excellent lighting, including night time lighting is also a great investment for aging in place.


    We also chose floor tiles with a lot of grip. Most designers say that any mosaic had a lot of grip because of all the grout lines. This is just not true in my experience. There is a rating number for the anti-slip properties of tile. We got a very common Daltile hex that had a high anti-slip rating. It was no more expensive than other similar tiles.



  • PRO
    9 months ago

    Making decisions based on estimated resale value is a mistake. Making decisions based on your own need and functionality is a much better idea. If you squeeze everything into this relatively small space and then sell the house, I guarantee that the first thing the buyer will do is rip everything out and start over.

  • 9 months ago

    Just as an FYI. Barn doors for bathrooms, unless privacy is not a major issue because it’s en suite, don’t really seal, or keep out noise or light.

  • 9 months ago
    last modified: 9 months ago

    In case you want some inspiration from a really small bathroom, here is the one that we recently renovated with aging in place and universal design in mind. It was built in 1938. I decided to change the swing of the door from opening in to opening out. It was a game changer.

    https://www.houzz.com/discussions/6402032/crazy-absurd-bathroom-renovation

  • 9 months ago

    @Kendrah - Not only is that a phenomenal NYC apartment transformation, it’s a great “small bathroom” design. The room actually looks bigger.

  • 9 months ago

    @RedRyder - Thanks. I was afraid that adding a wall between the shower and sink would make the bathroom feel so much smaller, but it didn't. I think size perception in small spaces is interesting. I orginally thought the sink would be more shallow to leave more room to stand in the nook in front of it. But we had to go with a deeper one and think having it the same depth as the shower wall helped the whole room feel less chopped up into compartments.


    Here's a link to the small kitchen we did in the same apartment. https://www.houzz.com/discussions/6402204/tiny-laundry-kitchenette

  • 9 months ago

    Wow. Being able to see past those two “over decorated” rooms takes huge vision! Great job on the kitchen too. And I know what a hassle NYC renovations can be.

  • 9 months ago

    Here's an option that will get you the larger vanity and walk-in shower you wanted. The tub is not necessary and doesn't fit well in this size bathroom. (Most tubs are dust catchers and buyers [and you] would rather have a good floor plan.) The window will give you good light and can have a bottom-up/top-down blind for privacy. I highly recommend medicine cabinets instead of wall mirrors because you can store SO much stuff in them to keep the counter clutter-free.


    Add a long niche in the shower to hold shampoo, etc. FYI, the niche can't go on an exterior wall.

    There might be room behind the door for a 12" deep cabinet to hold towels and bathroom supplies.

    (click to enlarge)




  • PRO
    9 months ago

    The layout above is workable, but at 5-8 the vanity is not long enough for two sinks. And closing off the shower with solid walls will make the bath feel even smaller than it is. Enclosing the shower in all glass would be much better.

  • 9 months ago

    There are quite a few 66" vanities online with 2 sinks, but if those don't look good to you, you can go with a 66" single sink. Glass enclosed shower is a lot of work to keep clean, but again that's up to you.

  • 9 months ago
    1. I would steer clear of the toilet and tub being across from one another like a fellow houzzer said.

    2. swap the location of the shower and tub.

    3. It it gives you more space since you are running water and draining on that side anyway you can place the vanity and sink between the shower and tub.

    4. Id keep the vanity where you’ve draw it and keep it small. However I’d ADD an oversized circle mirror between the shower and tub, add cute hooks for towels and def add ikeas floating low cabinetry. This increases your storage space and gives you that large “vanity” feeling you wanted.

  • 9 months ago

    Alternatively, do a freestanding tub with a shower. Photos attached for how sophisticated a bathroom can look without feeling crowded. This also gives you more than enough space to add the vanity on the opposite wall.

    In this day and age “more is less” and smarter more versatile options are in! Unless the goal was to have two people shower and bath time at the same time.

    Tip: GO OVERSIZED on mirrors and DEF spend the extra energy on making all your handles, knobs, accessories within a single color palette! Make it cohesive!

  • 9 months ago

    More photos for inspiration

  • 9 months ago

    Or go smaller for the walk in shower
    Or make your walk in shower and tub in a single space but separated.

  • 9 months ago

    There are 60” double sink vanities.