SHOP PRODUCTS
Houzz Logo Print
allison_gulka

Pink/blush accent wall in living room?

Gardengnome
last year

I’ve had a clay-red accent wall in my small, open floor plan, kid-consumed, well-loved house for over 5 years and I’m starting to get sick of the color. I love having an accent wall and I’m not ready to give it up yet but am considering changing up the color. I’m looking for color advice. The reason I painted it red originally was to coordinate with the terra cotta tiles that make up my wood stove surround, but I feel like it makes the off-white wall in between the two look weird. My open plan house (excuse the mess) has an interesting combination of finishes, including yellowish maple floors, “Saltillo” pink/tan/peachy tiles, yellowish ash cabinets and dark green marble countertops. I’ve considered many new colors for that living room accent wall but had trouble finding something that would work. This past week it just occurred to me that a subdued blush paint color with tan undertones might work on that wall, if it coordinated with both the wood stove surround and the nearby (pinkish) tile floors. I also need something warm that doesn’t clash with the off-white of most of the walls on this level of the house, and the warm woods. Is pink/blush a crazy idea?? I’m including mock-ups as well as some examples of the colors/finishes I have in the vicinity. I’m looking at colors like SW Redend Point or Hushed Aubur, that would fall squarely between the LRVs of the terra cotta and the off-white walls. Open to other ideas too!

I know my house isn’t perfect (at all) but I’m looking for a change of scenery on a tight budget.

Comments (147)

  • Gardengnome
    Original Author
    last year

    The curtains that were previously in the living room aren’t sheer, they’re cotton. I do think I want something with a pattern or visual interest. I like the look of woven wood shades. I’m looking for a super economical way to do that.

  • PRO
    Home Interiors with Ease
    last year

    Good Morning…you could add a accent band on the leading edge of the cotton curtains you have.

  • Related Discussions

    Living room grey and pink- need help with the right sofa

    Q

    Comments (27)
    Beverly, I like the look you created. However, I just got the wall painted. It is a high ceiling so I cannot repaint myself. It is sand color (Wise Owl by Kelly Moore). I am hoping for the grey sofa, sand walls and brown floors to be the neutral colors that will not stand out. Only the blush/pink accents to pop. I did the opposite in the other room with brown floor, grey walls and brown sofa. and teal color for pop. Will light grey sofa achieve this goal better than dark grey?
    ...See More

    Blush pink bathroom?

    Q

    Comments (33)
    Easier to match paint to curtain than the reverse. Happyleg makes a good point about off white being a versatile wall colour but don't think that blush walls will tie you in to one colour scheme. It pairs well with white, cream, yellow, coral, greens, blues, gold, grey, charcoal, black... Check Bed, Bath & Beyond. Society6 also offers shower curtains. You can easily lose an evening browsing that site.
    ...See More

    First home! Need help with living room accent wall

    Q

    Comments (20)
    You are just starting a lifetime journey. You have done a great job selecting core furnishings and bringing everything together, but it is still a bit on the "staged home" side of the fence. The room is cohesive and nice, but I can't tell who you are, what colors you love, what your passions are. Wall color is one way to bring life to a room. Color in area rugs, art, décor, upholstery, window coverings are other ways to bring color into your space. Knowing what colors make your heart sing and then deciding how to add those colors into your home is how you can personalize the space. Same room - accent colors subdued. . . Accent Colors intensified Wall Color Added Here are a few more with and without wall color
    ...See More

    Orange accent wall for living room. Help!

    Q

    Comments (6)
    Kudos to that furniture store to have the guts to have some color on the showroom floor! I went to a large mid/high end furniture store a few weeks ago and everything was white, beige or gray.
    ...See More
  • doods
    last year
    last modified: last year

    No curtains ... cause to me they make the room look much smaller and cluttered. Your windows have lovely wood framing, for me that should be the highlight, and it also opens up the room in a very nice way.

  • Gardengnome
    Original Author
    last year

    Do you mean a horizontal band or vertical?

  • marylut
    last year

    That room does not have an appropriate wall (meaning no openings for window, hallway, pass through, closet door) for an accent/focal wall IMO they provide best visual impact on uninterrupted wall.

  • PRO
    Home Interiors with Ease
    last year

    Vertical…like this

  • Amanda Smith
    last year

    I found these valances on Amazon. You could leave your existing rods.



  • partim
    last year
    last modified: last year

    The valance will look too small on your wall and you'll need to fill the wall spaces beside the window. It will look too busy.

    Adding contrasting fabric to the bottom will look like a misplaced blotch of colour that draws the eye to the floor on one side. Not the look you want

    Use 4 panels of what you have, add vertical trim on the inside or on both sides. Lower the rods. You can probably use the existing rods from the other windows, and just fasten them together in the middle with one of the brackets, instead of buying new longer rods.

    I wouldn't add too much visual interest there with a very eye catching curtain. The focal point is the fireplace.

  • justcallmepool
    last year

    I'm just popping in and reading your progress and think it looks great!


    If you still want some of that terra cotta paint color somewhere, maybe it would look good in your kitchen since your tile in there has that look?


    You could probably use your cotton curtains to make roman shades if you'd prefer those on the windows. You can still add some ribbon down the sides for a new look.

    If you decide to buy the woven shades, or any shades, wait until those sites have a big sale. They have sales all the time. I've gotten some from blinds.com and blindsgalore.com. They will have a sale at least 40% off, even 50% a couple times a year.

    I ordered tons of samples from each place and then waited for a sale. Just a tip.

  • lobo_93
    last year

    If you still want some wall color (terracotta or green), you might consider defining the new DR space, by painting both stair walls the same color ;)



  • Gardengnome
    Original Author
    last year

    Thank you all for the window suggestions. I’ve been toying with the idea of making faux Roman shades from existing white fabric. I happen to also have the supplies on hand (tension rods etc) so I could do it for practically free, which is very appealing to my practical side. And I’ve considered a simple stamp (linoleum or even potato stamps lol) to print on the fabric (see included stamp ideas in photos but imagine warm tones: rust/clay, etc). But it would be a project, and one that might not turn out being what I want. I’m a busy mom and time is a precious resource too. All of that said, I’m definitely also drawn to the look of woven wood shades. From the mock-ups I did of window treatments, the wooden shade was my favorite look (I was envisioning the fabric ones as Roman shades even though they look more like valences). What do you think? Should I spend some time on a DIY project while I save up for woven shades or something else? Is this idea worth it? Are woven wood shades too beachy? (I’m buried in snow right now and in the summer live in a lush green climate, NOT beachy… nor southwestern, despite my kitchen floor tiles). Trying to keep my very tight budget in mind while sticking to styles that not only look good in the room but also match my style/preferences.

  • Gardengnome
    Original Author
    last year

    And if that painting on the wall no longer works, I’m not tied to it…

  • PRO
    Beth H. :
    last year
    last modified: last year

    I like the bottom right version. looks better w/the wood

    You don't have a large window. shouldn't be more than a few hundred at blinds.com

    I don't like the 'faux' anything!


    these are nice too. lets in the light but gives privacy. Silouettes, Pirouttes, or Zebra blinds.


    bring your color in w/pillows, a throw, some art, if you think you need it.

  • A M
    last year

    If your windows are a "normal" size, JCPenney (online) always has blinds and shades on sale for a deep discount. Nothing fancy, but they always work in a pinch.

  • partim
    last year

    What I don't like about Roman blinds is that they cover some of the window, even when open. . I removed them in my kitchen and I like it so much better. It surprised me how much of a difference it made.

    I like the light.

  • Amanda Smith
    last year

    Not crazy about woven blinds on your windows, especially in your climate. They will probably cost more than you want to spend and will give a cold, hard look.


    Why not go ahead will your DIY project? If it fails, then back to the drawing board…

  • Susan
    last year

    If you’re considering diy operable Roman shades and the shades will likely be up during the daytime, I’d make them long enough so they can be mounted near the top of the wall, so the stacked shade covers the top of the window frame. That way it will make your window look taller and expose the whole window when the shade is stacked. If that’s too much trouble, diy cafe curtains. That way it offers some privacy on the lower pane but let’s in the light and the view of the trees/sky, the opposite of what an inside mounted shade would provide.

  • Susan
    last year

    Correction…so the stacked shade is mostly above the window with the lowest part of the shade overlapping just the top of the window frame.

  • Susan
    last year

    Here’s a similar shape/scale to your windows…just imagine it with one of your diy printed curtains! https://www.houzz.com/photos/millwork-rustic-bathroom-boston-phvw-vp~669861

  • Gardengnome
    Original Author
    last year

    I truly appreciate all of the windows treatment suggestions. I haven’t made a final decision, but without investing any money I decided to forge ahead with a quick DIY. This is kind of just tacked up to see what it would look like, I would spend more time on it, actually making even seams etc. if I were to stick with it. Thoughts on this type of thing? I still like woven shades, and the idea of woven shades plus curtains, but I don’t want to block too much light (and feel like they might be kind of a warm climate style?). I’ve looked online for more saturated curtain options too and nothing felt like “me”. This DIY Roman shade, on the other hand, is very “me,” though maybe a bit too basic (?). I’d love some honest (but kind) feedback 🙂. Don’t mind the evening artificial light, I’ll look at it again critically in natural light tomorrow.

  • PRO
    JAN MOYER
    last year

    Do "you" and take your time for a really nice finish and fit: )

  • partim
    last year
    last modified: last year

    Charming! I like your style.

    My only concern would be that you're blocking quite a bit of the glass, even when it's up. I wouldn't like that but you know best how much light you have and need.

    You could consider taking it higher up, even to the ceiling so that the bottom of the shade just covers the window trim, when open. Then you'd make it wider too, to cover the side trim. Some examples and discussion here.

    https://www.houzz.com/discussions/5953219/roman-shade-mounted-against-the-ceiling-yay-or-nay

    Mine go to the ceiling and are attached to a piece of 2" x 2" board.


  • Gardengnome
    Original Author
    last year

    Here are some mock-ups of different arrangements of the current shade (you’ll have to use your imagination a bit). I think inside mounted but shorter is awkwardly small, even though it would let more light in. I used my existing curtain brackets to move the shade up toward the ceiling, so maybe they’re too high, but I can’t tell anymore if any if them look okay (I’ve been looking at this view too much 😂). I zoomed out the most recent photo for some perspective with the wood stove, and am including pictures with a longer and a shorter shade. If I’m way off base with this, someone please let me know 😀

  • Amanda Smith
    last year

    I think you should mount them close to the ceiling and keep them just to the top of the window so you’re not blocking too much light.

  • partim
    last year

    I like them at ceiling height, but I think they need to be just a bit wider, maybe an inch wider than the window trim.

    Using your existing curtain rods will work, but the curtains need to be pulled tight to look smooth. I would triple fold the top hem so it is stiffer, and leave a bit of a casing for the rod. Hope you can understand my diagram which is looking at it from the side. The blue is the ceiling, the black is your fabric, the green is the rod, and the red is the stiching line. Leaving a little pocket for the rod will help the front to hang flatter. If you have some buckram you could also put that across the top to stiffen and smooth it.


  • btydrvn
    last year

    Less is more in this space…any embellishment beyond the window frame makes the ceilings look lower…the room feel smaller

  • Kelly Jones
    last year
    last modified: last year

    I wouldn't hang them to the ceiling.

    I would make a valance (piece of fabric about 8" tall (+ about 4-5" to wrap over and staple to the back of the board) and about 3" wider than your window trim for 1 1/2" on each side), and mount on a 1" x 3" board (mount the 1" edge flush with the wall with L-brackets) to keep the top smooth. The valance will then hide almost all when all the way up, which would expose your whole window. You might want to make sides to hide the board- 3" x 8".

    I hope this makes sense.

    Something like this:


  • Susan
    last year

    Of all of the options that have been put forth, a functional Roman shade mounted near the ceiling so the bottom of the stack covers the top portion of the window frame is the best option if you want complete privacy/light control…it will elongate the window, allow the maximum light/view, and work well with the architecture/furniture/fittings of the room. If a view to the outdoors, a balance of light and privacy and no need to interact on a daily basis operating a window treatment, a simple cafe curtain made with your diy print that covers the bottom portion of the window, including the middle horizontal frame/window clasp would be a lovely option and expand the spaciousness because your eye would go to the beautiful view at the top of the window. Picture it in this photo that you posted earlier yesterday…

  • Gardengnome
    Original Author
    last year

    So my thoughts about bringing it to the ceiling: it makes the (low) ceilings feel higher for sure. Does it also make the room feel smaller? Maybe. I noticed when a couple years ago we brought our curtains to the ceiling it made our house feel a lot bigger, because of the vertical space illusion.

    Here are a couple more arrangements. One is a cafe curtain, which Susan I thought I was totally against but I actually don’t mind it 🙂. What I don’t like is that it blocks the view from the bottom of the window, which is most of what I want to see out the window (kids playing, cars in the driveway, etc). Though I realize a real cafe curtain would open in the middle, right? Privacy is not a concern where we live, there’s truly no one around to look in our windows. I also roughly tried out a Roman shade/valence look all the way to the ceiling, since that’s where we have our curtain brackets currently, but it does look awkward to me. Maybe I do need something in between the window frame and the ceiling height wise.

  • Amanda Smith
    last year
    last modified: last year

    I think you may be right, Susan. Somewhere in between may be the best height for the shade. I certainly would not do cafe curtains with your views outside and no need for privacy.

  • PRO
    JAN MOYER
    last year
    last modified: last year

    I'm all for DIY with skill, patience or both.

    But not so much when something crosses the line to home Joe fail. Check Etsy.......

    And those windows deserve inside mount. You have a TV, a sconce close by. Do them well or not at all.: ) Some things are worth paying for, saving for. Just a bit. Lots of colors.

    https://www.etsy.com/listing/1062878926/85-colors-cotton-blend-flat-roman-shades?click_key=369bf8a8286abda1938dd77dc59923a8165d4536%3A1062878926&click_sum=202760bb&external=1&rec_type=cs&ref=landingpage_similar_listing_top-5&frs=1&sts=1


  • Amanda Smith
    last year

    Have you considered using your original curtains and tying them with ribbons to get a Roman shade effect?

  • Amanda Smith
    last year



  • Susan
    last year

    I can’t believe I’m going to say this…you may want to sit down…but I think painting the whole first floor the terra-cotta paint of your previous accent wall or even the grey color in one of the mock ups is the missing piece. It will blend with the window frames and provide a cohesive backdrop for the entire space that is not happening with the stained window frames and off white wall color. Then forget window treatments altogether…I didn’t realize you had no need for privacy/light control. Better to keep the windows open…making the most of the natural light and views and you’ll be able to see everything you need to see outside. If you find you want a little softness at the windows, you could always add a valance above the window or a cafe curtain at the bottom. I like how the cafe curtain on just the lower covers the dividing frame and clasp…it streamlines the look and gives the illusion that it’s one big pane and while it does block half of the view out the window, it draws the eye up to the beautiful views of the trees and sky on top…that may be a better option once your children are a little older. I don’t know if it’s possible, but if the floor heating registers can be painted without it being a safety issue, I’d paint those too. Thank you for the consideration you’ve given all of our ideas…you are a busy mom and have a lovely cozy home and we are all just trying to help.

  • Amanda Smith
    last year

    A really dramatic fabric at the windows would perk things up. Love this look:


  • Amanda Smith
    last year

    In the meantime, I vote for this option:


  • Amanda Smith
    last year

    These draw the eye upward and give the window a finished look.

  • partim
    last year
    last modified: last year

    There's no reason to think that Etsy quality would be any better than the OP's finished product, which we have not seen. The OP said "This is kind of just tacked up to see what it would look like, I would spend more time on it, actually making even seams etc. if I were to stick with it."

    My experience is that I regret the pricey Roman blinds made by my decorator's choice of vendor - cheap materials used, and short cuts obvious to anyone who sews.

    At ~$200 for each Roman blind, that adds up pretty fast, and could probably be spent on something more impactful even after saving up. And I'm a "Reduce, reuse, recycle" kind of person so I admire the re-use of the curtains, especially with the addition of the charming print. When people suggest to add your own personality to a room, that's the kind of thing that to me is authentic personal style.

  • PRO
    JAN MOYER
    last year

    Yes........

    "This is kind of just tacked up to see what it would look like, I would spend more time on it, actually making even seams etc. if I were to stick with it."

    I said.........."Skill" and? or "patience" : )

    Cut line, sew, sew rings....cord lock ..etc.

    When you make one? You realize 200.00 fabric and labor combined is a deal.

    Or you give it your best shot, and pay yourself.


  • partim
    last year

    @JAN MOYER you're right that skill and time/patience are required.

    Unfortunately my experience has been that spending the money is no guarantee of quality. My custom Roman blinds came with fragile plastic rings that crack and are a pain to replace. They were sewed on with thread that seems to dissolve in the direct sun. I use metal rings and 100% polyester thread when I do the repair. And no cord locks - the cords just pull through an eye and we wind the cord around a bracket to hold them raised. Not how they should have been made given their width, weight and cost.

    Especially since the OP has the fabric already, I would also make the same decision as her and make them myself. I don't know about the OP but also I take satisfaction in making things myself rather than buying them. An intangible thing but it's real for me. YMMV.

  • Gardengnome
    Original Author
    last year

    Thank you Jan and Amanda for the suggestions for an inside mount shade. I may very well save up to buy something that I love (and that hopefully is of good quality). In the meantime, I have a good friend who is an experienced seamstress, and a handy husband, so for the time being I may make the current fabric into a proper shade. As you all know, I’m a busy mom with littles all around, so if this solution isn’t perfect, I’m okay with it because it’s probably also temporary (but I’ll do my best!). I came to this forum for outside opinions, even if my house isn’t designer-quality, and I really appreciate the thought you all have put in! I certainly know DIYs can be less than ideal, and that store-bought options can be both perfect or a flop as well (partim). I’ll try to be wary of both potential issues.

    And Susan, I had to laugh at your suggestion to paint all of the walls 🙂 A new color all around will certainly happen someday. TBH I didn’t love the cream color when I first pur it up, but it’s slowly growing on me. The old accent wall did disguise the wood trim, and now the trim pops, so I guess that depends on your preference (or really, my preference… my house 😉). I was against the wood trim to start with this house, but it’s growing on me now too. If I have any more updates to share I’ll post them…

  • PRO
    JAN MOYER
    last year
    last modified: last year

    Trade. A good friend who's a great seamstress? A handy hubby who can install? What can YOU do for them? Millions of years ago, this was a common thing. Trade "service/time/energy" , not dollars: ) Call it win win.

  • kl23
    last year

    I like a cream color. Maybe it's my monitor, but the current cream looks too green to me. I saw a picture of a kitchen and thought that cream was better, but it could have been my monitor or reflected light. If you love teal, it would be a nice counterbalance to the warm flooring and terra cotta tiles. I say use it as an accent color since you live it. Olive green wouldn't be bad either. I like some warm colors in a cool room and some cool colors in a warm room. You're doing great so far!

  • Gardengnome
    Original Author
    last year

    Thanks KL. This off-white/cream/beige color has been on my walls for years and it does baffle me. Sometimes it does read yellow/green, which isn’t my favorite. Again, I’m keeping it for now but will definitely consider repainting in the future when my time allows. The kitchen walls are Simply White (BM), which is a white with a bit of warmth. It’s a brighter/whiter shade. I do love teal and greens (and my kitchen counters are a deep green marble, Serpentine). I’ve struggled with how to pull together all of the colors I can’t easily change (trim, floors, cabinets, counters). I may have gotten the wrong undertone years ago with the cream colored walls. Perhaps another reason not to invest in expensive window treatments right away- first I’ll get the wall color to something that works better. And yes Jan, I’ll absolutely consider a skill trade! 🙂 That large (eyesore of a) metal shelf will soon be filled with garden seedlings, a good bartering tool.

  • Susan
    last year

    Gardengnome, I’m glad you have a sense of humor! My suggestion to paint all of the walls the terra-cotta or the grey was not to disguise the wood trim, but to work with it. Like you, when I saw the accent wall after it was painted to match the off white walls, I didn’t love the result. After reviewing/considering all of the information/photos/suggestions, I found myself returning to the terra-cotta accent wall and your old mock up of the fireplace area in grey…the paint color harmonizes with the wood /furnishings and your artwork/decor pops in those areas. It occurred to me that enveloping the entire space in that or a similarly saturated color all around might be the answer. I do not have mock up skills, but maybe you or someone who does can provide a mock up of the terra-cotta and the grey on some of the other walls. I know painting all of the walls is a TALL order, but if that is the missing piece, the painting could be done over time, at your pace, and when the budget allows. You were able to paint one wall…so that could be the way it gets done…one wall at a time. Or invite your handy friends over for a painting party.

  • PRO
    Home Interiors with Ease
    last year

    I would use the curtains you have..that room needs the vertical curtain just add a trim or banding..use iron on fabric tape..easy breezy! It will soften the room up…why make the two square windows even more pronounced and why cover the nice light coming in with a shade…I think you are making this harder than needed..use what you already have…it works

  • Amanda Smith
    last year

    If you are going back to your original curtains, which were very nice, just be sure to lower the curtain rods!

  • Amanda Smith
    last year

    I think that is the best all-around solution for you! Also, you could hang your artwork on that wall to make the wall a focal point. You don’t need the art on the pass-through wall.

  • A M
    last year

    All light filtering, $48-$75