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pieter_k

@hosta_maker Doug: Polyploid pods

Pieter zone 7/8 B.C.
3 months ago
last modified: 3 months ago

Hey Doug,You mentioned in an earlier response to one of my posts that fatter pods likely are polyploid. On one of my 'Empress Wu' divisions I have pods on several scapes which are from the first flowers and they might very well have been pollinated by the bees that were visiting a polyploid -'Revolution'- that was near and in full bloom at the time. Picture below shows what I mean:As you can see, the oldest pod is shorter and fatter than the rest. How good are the odds of that being a polyploid pod?

Pieter

Comments (3)

  • hosta_maker
    3 months ago
    last modified: 3 months ago

    Hi pieter

    the mothers ploidy should be true and consistent for all aspects of the plant, flower, pod, leaf size etc. you may see slight variation in pods on the same plant, those seem to be more environmental effects or incomplete fertilization

    there is a chance the op seed could result in a ploidy seedling. those traits wouldnt show until you grow the seed to find out. the fact that the length of the style is much longer than the anthers gives it a better chance of a cross than selfing.


    Pieter zone 7/8 B.C. thanked hosta_maker
  • Pieter zone 7/8 B.C.
    Original Author
    3 months ago

    you may see slight variation in pods on the same plant, those seem to be more environmental effects

    Indeed just what I was wondering, environmental rather then genetic... oh well, I was just pondering...and having said that, I've saved the 3 pods in question and I'll see what happens with the seed in the spring.

    Thanks for your insight!

    Pieter

  • bkay2000
    3 months ago

    Thanks for sharing (not that I'm going to grow anything), it's interesting.

    bk

    Pieter zone 7/8 B.C. thanked bkay2000
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