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Comments (59)

  • nancy_in_venice_ca Sunset 24 z10
    last month

    i’m impressed by the size of the laundry room.


    As for the rest — you could not pay me to live there in its current state.

  • carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b
    last month

    Pretty cool - the word 'flamboyant' springs to mind in re: the decor 😃

    And can't the description have paragraphs? Is that too much to ask?


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  • barncatz
    last month
    last modified: last month

    I skimmed the photos because I disliked it; but I kept thinking there was maybe a lovely home buried under all that decorating. It made me think of what that cheerful Texas decorator said about her home when they first bought it. And I laughed at @deegw' s comment. I'm no expert, but I don't think that "polished sophistication" means what the person who wrote that thinks it does.

  • deegw
    last month
    last modified: last month

    It reminds me of those stores in tourist towns that are stuffed with expensive, heavily ornate furniture and decor items that I suspect are some type of money laundering vehicle.


    Also, I have a few questions. What is this?



  • bpath
    last month

    All I can see (well, choose to see) is that amazingly beautiful floor. Sa-woon.

    I imgaine the realtor suggested removing some artwork and accessories, and the homeowner said ”not on your life, babe.” On the other hand, maybe the homeowner DID remove some artwork and accessories.

  • Kswl
    last month

    Lots of interesting erotic art throughout the home. Staging that place would have been very costly, and the decor hasn’t completely subsumed the architecture, light , layout and views. Except for gutting the bathrooms and kitchen—- a project that’s a given for most buyers at that price range regardless of what they look like—- removing the furniture and decor and painting the interior will leave the new owners with a bouse with great bones.

  • arcy_gw
    last month

    I would disagree. It was staged. It's very neat and tidy, nothing just left out. It is not depersonalized...but it is very prepped for visitors IMHO. It's a home layered with the life they lived. They did a good job displaying their things. The floors in the living/dining room are art!!! To sterilize this home given how things were displayed would have been more work than it's worth!!

  • Elizabeth
    last month

    The owners put a lot of time, effort and money into decorating. I find it jarring to look it myself. It would be a monstrous undertaking to dismantle it all and move it out. I wouldn't buy it.

  • Sueb20
    last month

    Um, I’m here for my 9:00 deep tissue massage?



  • Sueb20
    last month

    Dee, I think it anyone explained that picture to you, they’d get banned from houzz.

  • Bumblebeez SC Zone 7
    last month

    Aw, a wall phone.

  • carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b
    last month
    last modified: last month

    I really dig the hallway. It's like a pop art installation.

    Somebody likes Rudi Gernreich.

    And the staircase is lovely.

  • Kswl
    last month

    Elizabeth, the sellers are the ones who will have to pack, move and clean the home. I don’t see why that process— monumental as it will be— would deter someone from buying the house.

  • palimpsest
    Original Author
    last month

    If you are an address person, which I think most of the people on this block probably are, this is one of the blocks on one of the streets to live on. Based upon the way the outsides of the houses look, I think you form an impression of what the insides should look like, and this is Not it.

    But I think a lot of them probably do not look like what you would expect from the outside. This one at least seems to have maintained basic details and volumes. (Some of these have been in very bad shape inside at some point, despite the address).


  • nicole___
    last month

    I love the inlaid wood floors....and lack of furniture so they're visible. :0) I also love a mix of modern and old...transitional is my thang!

  • bbstx
    last month

    ”Exuberant” was the word that came to mind as I looked at the pictures. Did anyone else notice how high the toe-kick is under all the kitchen cabniets? With the obvious divisions, I’m guessing there are toe-kick drawers.


    Loved the ceiling fixture in the LR but the repetitious, karate-chopped pillows made me want to scream. And that lonely, broken down maroon-ish sofa upstairs just looked sad.

  • Springroz
    last month

    I would have moved the hooka from tubside....

  • Ally De
    last month

    I agree with KSWL. I loved it!


    I read all of the responses before I looked at the listing. It was not nearly as horrifying as I was expecting....


    Some of the art (heck, maybe most of the art!), no - not my taste. Who cares? The people who own the place will take the art with them.


    Would I want to live there as my home, surrounded by that particular art? No. It is not generally stuff that resonates with me. So I guess if one is judging it on those merits - i.e., "just move in" as is, then I suppose I can understand the negativity. I was looking at it as a real estate listing - and I always imagine the seller's stuff gone when I do that.


    I also agree the upper floor/s look like a completely different house.


    (As a side note - Arcy, I actually enjoyed reading your comment. Thank you. It's one of the few times I've seen you post without yelling at us, nor being snarky to any of the posters here. When you post without being snotty you contribute something and I appreciate that.)

  • Jinx
    last month
    last modified: last month

    For me, it’s not the art that I don’t like, that’s actually all I do like (oh, and the library).

    It’s the big stuff — the architectural details and design elements. I’d basically want to gut a lot of it.

    That’s why I was surprised at my negative feelings, I‘m usually of the mind, oh I can have fun working around all that! Let’s do this! But this whole place just feels ‘off’ to me in so many ways.

    This bathroom, for example … it has elements I’d normally love (old vanity, etc). But the overall look here just turns me off:



    The exterior is my dream, though!

    ETA: If I was viewing the house, I’d just be wanting to stop and look at all the wall art. It’s like a museum, very interesting collection.

  • deegw
    last month

    I objectively understand why people love the inlaid floor but to me, it's way too bossy. I'd have to restain it to tone it down or cover it with rugs.

  • Ida
    last month

    I went back for another look, trying to envision the space without all the stuff. (And I too think the art is the best aspect of this home.) I could see how it could be lovely if done with more restraint, although I still maintain that there remains a good deal that just feels all wrong to me. This, for instance. What were they thinking?



  • 1929Spanish-GW
    last month

    I love the neatly kept closet….would kill for one like it. And I’m weirdly on love with the ”extra” bathroom and newspaper hallway, a la Y2K Dior.

    palimpsest thanked 1929Spanish-GW
  • Jinx
    last month

    Ida, ha! We posted the same picture. 😆

  • HU-787167202
    last month

    There appears to be plenty of repurposing going on in this home. That's a + in my book.

  • Ida
    last month

    Oh jeez, Jinx! Why am I not surprised! 😂

  • Fori
    last month

    Who doesn't like the saint of the medicine cabinet?

  • Ally De
    last month

    Yeah, that bathroom is no bueno. Not going to lie, that didn't do it for me either. I almost specifically called it out in my post, but then there are some other rooms on the upper floors that don't do it for me either.


    I don't know - maybe I spent too much time looking at new construction in the last few years. You want to be horrified, go visit some of what is sold as "custom" new construction out there now. Soulless, lifeless ill-proportioned rooms wrapped in grey paint. And shiplap. Gotta have the shiplap!


    Like KSWL said, "Except for gutting the bathrooms and kitchen—- a project that’s a given for most buyers at that price range regardless of what they look like—- removing the furniture and decor and painting the interior will leave the new owners with a house with great bones." That's what I am seeing - great bones. Not a soulless, lifeless box of grey and shiplap.

  • Elizabeth
    last month

    Kswi:

    I clearly understand that it is the sellers who would move their furnishings/possessions out and that the processes is not a deterrent to sale.

  • Annie Deighnaugh
    last month

    It looks to me like they started decorating on the ground floor and never made it to the upper floors. The contrast between the 2 is stark. I was looking at the bones of the place and there's a lot to like, but there's so much you have to look past to find them. It starts with the art piece in the foyer that triggers my OCD...


    The art in the powder room that dee was asking about...is that sliding curtains on the frame so you can cover the image if you have people over who might be offended? If so, you have to wonder why they didn't pull them for the real estate pics.


    From the cupie dolls and stuffed animals to the religious icons to the explicit images, there's something very strange going on here. I can't help but think of the Castevets in Rosemary's Baby. But whoever did it certainly spent a lot of time, money and effort to make it look that way.


    What, pray tell, is this appliance in the laundry room?



  • Jinx
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Annie, I think it’s a vintage Kewpie doll washing machine. Very rare.

    :D

  • maddielee
    last month

    Aren’t these vintage Carnival game targets?








  • teeda
    last month

    I think that laundry appliance is a vintage mangle ironing machine.

  • deegw
    last month

    Annie, the more I look at the box over the toilet paper I am wondering if it is a peep show diorama. It must be pretty explicit for it to be blurred while many other erotic items are not.

  • Elizabeth
    last month

    I thought it was a vintage mangle also and a small bench to sit on while working.

  • palimpsest
    Original Author
    last month

    I think one message here is that you can't bury classic proportions and strong architecture no matter how hard you try.

  • barncatz
    last month
    last modified: last month

    @Annie Deighnaugh said: "I can't help but think of the Castevets from Rosemary's Baby". Perfect!

  • Yayagal
    last month

    I came out not feeling impressed but compressed. Shaking it off now.

  • deegw
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Do you think the help lives upstairs?

  • palimpsest
    Original Author
    last month

    These are three, sometimes really four story vertically arranged houses ( I lived in one that was 4- but really 6 including the English basement and an attic which did originally have quarters in it),

    It's possible help lived upstairs, but it's also just likely they just stopped decorating the higher up they went.

    I know someone who bought one of these that only had birds and squirrels living on the top floor for some years, even though people still lived downstairs


  • cawaps
    last month

    I don't hate it. Neither he erotica and catholica (is that a word?) are to my taste, and I find their presence in the same house to be interesting. I suspect pieces were chosen and arranged (altarpiece over the lavatory sink?) to be provocative, and they succeeded. If you peel off the artwork and furnishings, I think I could live with the various surface treatments.

  • Gooster
    last month

    I was too expecting something far worse. I can see past the decor and art and recognize the proportions, lines and some really nice elements beneath the taste-specific items (and some of it I like, sort of, like the hallway wall covering). Some of it is very distracting, like that bathroom and some of the more fringe art. It all could use some editing to let the best pieces shine.


    I once went in a home showing where the owner had a collection of photographic body studies, in all their glory. It was awkward because the owner was there. At least he was not one of the subjects of the photos.

  • Lars
    last month

    It looks like it would be a good set for a horror movie.

    The views from the windows are unfortunate, and the kitchen window especially needs some covering.

  • pricklypearcactus
    last month

    I'm a little surprised at the strong dislike response. It's not my style exactly, but I rather like the bones of the house. Love the floor in the living room so much. I enjoy some aspects of the architecture and I don't really mind the decor too much. It's not what I would choose, but it also doesn't really bother me. Maybe the only things that I dislike are the overly ornate bathroom (which seems a little out of place with the rest of the house to me) and the gray LVP in one of the last pictures.

  • cawaps
    last month

    Room by room


    Living room. The floor is a lot, but it you let it bet the star, it's fine. Wallpaper and ceiling are fine. The chandelier would be fine in a different house but here the eclecticism feels a bit forced.

    I hate the built-in shelves, especially how they are lit and the glass shelves. I also really dislike the furniture, both the style and the fabric. I'm ignoring art for this exercise.


    Dining room: I don't know what the finish is on the columns. Very lux and pearly, but again falls in the category of trying too hard. I repaint them to match the trim. The multicolored chair upholster scream, "See how fun I am!!!!!" while being too much on top of the busy floors. The wood chairs with open backs also add busy-ness. I'd probably do something like a parson's chair (all in the same fabric!) to minimize the competition with the floor.


    Kitchen: Seems very 90s with the raised panels, travertine, and weird angles. The layout seems fine. It's merely "meh." I've seen much worse.



    Powder room: I don't know what this wall covering is. I don't like it, but it's beige enough that I don't feel a need to rage against it (maybe if I knew what it was I would like it less, or maybe more; from the pic, eh). The sconce falls under what I said above about the arwork; it seems designed to be provocative. I don't like it and I'd replace it.


  • palimpsest
    Original Author
    last month
    last modified: last month

    I feel like a lot of things are slightly discount version of something a little better or more genuine. A better version of this floor would have been properly centered in the space and scaled probably a bit smaller, for example.

    And the original floor would have been nothing like this. It probably would have been nice but planned for coverage with wall to wall carpet (In 1860, yes in a room like this, carpet)

    The kitchens in these houses face an alley. There is the backs of the houses just face the backs of other houses, some of which are not very well kept and none of which are actually a "view"

  • cawaps
    last month

    Bedroom: I quite like the bedroom, with the exception of the curtains (again, I'm not including art in my critique). The bedding is great, I love it. I like the rug. The dressers amuse me. I think the motif is supposed to be stylized tulips alternating with maybe stylized grape clusters (???), but I see the three circles with the dots as very surprised cartoon penguins. It amuses me; sue me. The rug is nice too. I'm on the fence about the wall covering here. Part of me wants to paint the room white, but I think that might kill some of the warm, cozy feeling I like about the room. I'd have to think on it.


    Bathroom. Mixed bag. I like the tile a lot. I don't understand what the B/W stripe banded sections of wall are. I don't know what they're made of or why they are there. It's a mystery. I like the window in the shower (assuming it's not creating water problems). I like the ceiling color. I'm baffled by the pendant light placement. The vanity is unique; I would have to reevaluate after other elements were changed.


    Sitting Room: I like this room a lot, too. You could easily go all Ralph Lauren lodge in here. Leather, wood, throw in some plaid.


  • palimpsest
    Original Author
    last month

    A medicine cabinet, or other built in cabinet in that bathroom. Not something I would upholster.

  • Springroz
    last month

    Possibly not a popular opinion...but this house looks like it was done for a Sheik.... and the harem members not chosen for that day "lived" upstairs.

  • Tina Marie
    last month

    While there are things in the house I like, overall, it is over-done and "heavy" feeling to me.

  • carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Re: the large bathroom

    Why does it remind of a Victorian saloon - or barbershop?