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aklogcabin

Insulation questions

aklogcabin
2 months ago

Hello all. My beautiful wife n me are building our retirement home this year. 28x40 ranch. We're in AK so energy efficient is important. I've been researching the best options for zone 7 insulating for new home construction.

After a bunch of research I believe I have our final plan. Only getting one chance to get it correct.

Our current and hopefully solid plan is. Walls are 2x6 with 1/2"cdx plywood. Wall cavity is filled with fire and sound rockwool insulation. Then a 6 mil vapor barrier sealed with acustic butyl caulk on all edges.

2" of pinkboard ridgid sturofoam R-10 is installed over the visqueen vapor barrier. 1x4 are installed horizontally. 5 rows, top bottom middle, middle of the middle. Then 1x4s are installed vertically at 16oc to the studs with 7" timberlock screws. Sheetrock. By placing the insulation on the inside there is no worry of the siding saying. In cold climates this is except able. Creating a thermal barrier.

Several differences there. The 2" pinkboard adds R10 to the insulation. Nail holes through the vapor barrier are greatly reduced. The chase created by the 1x4s will allow utilities, water lines n electrical, to be ran easily. And still be 1-1/4" back from interior wall meeting code. I may add a metal guard. Greatly reduces the amount of holes in the vapor barrier. With no utilities in the outer walls insulation will be much easier to install. And no holes to drill for utilities.

Outer walls are plywood with tyvex over it. 1x2 nailers installed vertically on studs 16"oc. Creating a rain wall. 1x6 pine boards stained with golden oak to bring out the grain with a good oil based topcoat on both sides. Galvanized nails. I want the look of a log home. So a 3/8" gap between the boards. A 3/8" square foam will be installed on the back edge of the pine board siding Creating a 3/8" square on the outer edge to be filled with permachink.

Attic will get 20" of blown in cellulose insulation. Metal roof. Brick red in color. The facia and trim will be rough cut cedar with an orange tint.

The walls are designed to dry to the outside.

The foundation is a hydronic heated slab. I increased the amount of hydronic tubing. Using 1,500 feet instead of usual 1000 feet generally installed. Placing the tubing 8" oc as opposed to 12" oc. Increasing the thermal mass. Keeping a more even heat. There is 4" R20 ridgid insulation under the cement floor and 4"" R-20 around the outer perimeter.

As for the rest of the home. Hot water will be from the Toyo boiler and in a 40 gallon indirect tank so we should have endless hot water. We also have a Jotul oil fired drip stove that resembles a wood burning stove for our living room. It requires no electricity and we have frequent power outages and at 40 below not a good thing. We do have an 8kw generator for backup.

Thank you again and any suggestions would be greatly appreciated


Comments (35)

  • David Cary
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    You have been to building science website?

    I would probably try for more insulation generally.

    Your walls are 2x6 - but what are you doing about thermal bridging (sorry if I missed it). R-10 on a thermal bridge is still not great in AK.

    Your ceiling is R-70, I have R-98 in NC.

    Placing tubing closer together does not make more thermal mass. Mass is mass - to get more you need more concrete which I am not saying you need - just making the point. You might be spending money needlessly.

    If I was building in AK, I would strongly consider 2x12 walls with 2 layers of framing and cellulose in between. Then you have R-42 with bridging still R-28. Your plan has R-18 in the walls + R-10 so something like R-28 with bridging of R-16.

    Windows is a big consideration as well as doors. You haven't mentioned that although admittedly it is a later decision.

    Thermal mass is mostly important for using solar gain during the day and carrying it through the night. Outside of that, it really isn't much help. Have you designed the house with mostly south facing windows?

  • PRO
    Charles Ross Homes
    2 months ago

    I'm not sure what your question(s) is. I do know that your climate zone is unforgiving. I agree that you only get one chance to do it right. If you haven't already devoured Joe Lstiburek's "Builder's Guide to Cold Climates" I suggest you get a copy do so:

    https://www.buildingscience.com/bookstore/ebook/ebook-builders-guide-cold-climates

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  • Seabornman
    2 months ago

    You're putting the foam in the wrong side of the wall. Go to http://cchrc.org/remote-walls/ This is the way I insulated my house in zone 5. A rain screen with 2 layers of 1-1/2" XPS foam board on exterior of sheathing. 2x6 at 24" o.c. with fiberglass batts. No need for an interior vapor retarder. Easy to run electrical and plumbing. I can provide pics if you're interested.

  • aklogcabin
    Original Author
    2 months ago

    Thanks folks. Yes I've read building science n read it several times. And was able to visit with a technician from the cold climate research center personally.

    David. I have R21 rockwool and R-10 foam. R-31 in insulation. As far as thermal mass. More heat tubing is more mass, there is more of it. When it is 40 below the extra volume will help keep the boiler from short cycling and running more. So I feel spending extra money up front here is beneficial.

    Money. If money was no object I would probably add more insulation. Local code suggests r42. With R 65 I'm already considerably more. Comes a time when you can't recoup the costs.

    Whole house wall value. Yes more windows n doors are more breaks in the building envelope. There is a point where our personal enjoyment comes in to play. I was to be able to see the grandkids playing in the yard and the beautiful mountains. And in ak daylight can be an issue. Bedrooms need egress windows.

    My point in this thread is asking about how I'm designing the walls and installing insulation. Trying to get the most energy efficient home we can get. Fuel oil is expensive and ak gets cold. Also because I an planing a different type of construction method. I'm pretty sure of the physics behind it but there are a lot of smart folks in these parts.

    And I appreciate the input. Thank you

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  • David Cary
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    Looks like you are too far along for staggered 2x4 and 2x12 walls. That is really the best with oil heat and AK climate. Code is foolish in the attic. You can be happy to be better than code but still be financially inadequate with a long term prospect. Code was written to be the least adequate not the ideal, best, or even financially smart.

    If you really wanted to know the best answer, you should have asked before framing was installed.

  • PRO
    Charles Ross Homes
    2 months ago

    "If you really wanted to know the best answer, you should have asked before framing was installed."

    Agreed. The best homes tend to be ones designed in the design phase--not on the fly.

  • Jason
    2 months ago

    If you haven't been (in addition to the Building Science website), Green Building Advisor is another good site with lots of information on building energy efficient homes, wall and roof assemblies, etc.

  • PRO
    Charles Ross Homes
    2 months ago

    It's certainly not impossible to construct wall and roof assemblies that work in the OP's climate zone--and without major alterations to the existing frame structure. One such option is to install structural insulated panels (SIPs) if there is a SIPs panel manufacturer within a couple hundred miles.

  • aklogcabin
    Original Author
    2 months ago

    No places around that make structural panels. I'm curious as the construction methods I'm using up,to this point are basic boiler plate common. Most folks around here have 2x6 walls with batt insulation in walls. That's it.

    I'm going to add 2" pinkboard to the inside and this is about the only other difference.

    So what about the design makes it bad ? And actually the idea of installing the 2" of pinkboard on the inside of the wall came from the technician from the cold climate research center.

    So again I'm curious. What exactly about the house plan is inadequate and where knowledge was lacking. Since I'm following code and the inspector says things look great.

  • Seabornman
    2 months ago

    There's several reasons 2" of foam on the interior is inadvisable. First the installation must be perfect and continuous, as any interior air that gets in the wall will turn to ice or water when it hits the back of the sheathing. All doors and windows would need the foam wrapped into the openings, presenting the very difficult task of sealing to the window. Second is the monolithic slab you have poured, which is totally exposed to the outside. That slab will also condense moisture. 

    You would be well served to put insulation on the exterior per the website I posted earlier. I think if you sent the pictures you've posted to the person you talked to who suggested interior insulation, they'd say it's not going to work.

    aklogcabin thanked Seabornman
  • kevin9408
    2 months ago

    If insulation the interior wall with foam it is recommended not to exceed 1/3 of the total wall insulation R value behind it. You have R20 covered by R10 which is half and too much. Moisture will collect inside the fiber insulation and this recommendation comes from the

    Cold Climate research center, he clearly states this at the end.



  • PRO
    Frank and Frank
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    Slab construction in freezing climates requires that that slab be completely thermally isolated from the exterior. That thermally isolating the interior spaces from the exterior starts below the slab, And it should continue up outside the framing, and should also continue to the roof plane. This is where a built in place SIPS for the roof works, with a ”semi conditioned” attic. That works for hot or cold environments both.

    You should think of this as building a Yeti cooler. With holes in it for triple paned windows, and an airlock double door entry foyer, similar to some commercial buildings. You will also need a fresh air exchanger with ERV for a tight building like that.

  • PRO
    Charles Ross Homes
    2 months ago

    I agree with Seabornman that rigid insulation is more appropriate as continuous exterior insulation. I also suggest you rethink the use of polyethylene as a vapor retarder; it limits the potential for drying to the interior. In lieu of polyethylene, I suggest you consider an "intelligent" vapor retarder such as ProClima's Intello Plus https://proclima.com/products/internal-sealing/intello-plus

  • David Cary
    2 months ago

    I totally missed the foam to the inside part of the original description. I should have jumped on that right away. I just presumed (even though it is clear as day) that OP was talking outside foam.

    Code is written to be the cheapest way of making a house have a reasonable cost to heat and comfort level (and safety of course). That being said, it typically won't get you in trouble. If you do better than code, you should make sure you do it right. And that isn't that much foam on the inside in a cold climate.

    As far as AK code, you have to consider the political environment that it is wrtten in and the oil money that factors in. If you are building for yourself, it typically makes sense to be significantly better than code. Code is also old and outdated. Builders/developers with political power want the construction to be as cheap as possible. Their goal is to have 2x6 framing with batts - not because it is in anyway adequate - it is just cheap. When oil,and now NG, get expensive, the code will take years to change.

    Anywhere cold should be either staggered 2x4s or exterior foam. You also get awesome sound insulation from staggered 2x4 as well as better R-values.


  • PRO
    Charles Ross Homes
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    "Code is written to be the cheapest way of making a house have a reasonable cost to heat and comfort level (and safety of course)."

    The primary purpose of residential building codes is to ensure occupant safety. By definition, they set minimum standards. Energy efficiency and construction detailing for longevity of the structure are more recent parts of the code and tend to change more each code cycle. I believe they are updated on the same cycle as other parts of the code, which is a three-year cycle. The cycle time limits incorporating the most recent building science knowledge into the code, but the code provides the code official with some flexibility. Alternatives to prescriptive code requirements can be substituted if they are proven to the code official to meet or exceed the prescriptive code requirement.

    "As far as AK code, you have to consider the political environment that it is wrtten (sic) in and the oil money that factors in."

    Residential codes are developed with input from a broad range of stakeholders. I believe the 2018 International Residential Code forms the core of Alaska's statewide building code. Here's an excerpt from the 2018 IRC:

    The International Residential Code is kept up-to-date through the review of proposed changes submitted by code enforcement officials, industry representatives, design professionals and other interested parties. Proposed changes are carefully considered through an open code development process in which all interested and affected parties may participate.

    The ICC Code development process reflects the principles of openness, transparency, balance, due process, and consensus, the principles embodied in OMB Circular A-119, which governs the federal government's use of private-sector standards. The ICC process is open to anyone; there is no cost to participate, and people can participate without travel costs through the ICC's cloud-based app, cdp-Access.

    I encourage you to contact the International Code Council and offer your considerable expertise to assist with the development of the next codes. With the cdp-Access app, you won't need to leave the comfort of home to do so and I don't think you need to disclose your political party affiliation.

    "When oil,and now NG, get expensive, the code will take years to change."

    The process for revising a statewide code will, of course, vary from state to state. I believe the International Energy Conservation Code, which is incorporated in the International Residential Code, is revised on a three-year cycle just like the IRC, but I could be wrong on that.

  • aklogcabin
    Original Author
    2 months ago

    Yokay. The slab has R20 under the 4" of cement. And R20 wrapped around the perimeter.

    The walls are meant to dry to the outside. And for what it's worth, we don't have to follow any building codes or get a permit. But I have hired an inspector and have over built the required r 21 walls and 42 roof that is suggested by the department of energy. And lending institutions.

    I have also talked to many different local contractors and they have had positive response. And have been around the building industry for near 45 years.

    I also am the kind of fellow that is willing to try something new. And believe that this style of construction method will work better . And for what it's worth I did 2 years of college for Refrigeration and heating.

    Physics is physics. I am fairly confident in the process I'm using. Installing 2" of foam insulation on the inside wall is different and I have questions. And do appreciate the responses.

  • PRO
    Charles Ross Homes
    2 months ago

    @aklogcabin,

    The insulation R-values for your climate (zone 7) in the 2018 IRC are either R-20 in the wall cavities plus R-5 continuous or R-13 in wall cavities plus R-10 continuous. The required attic insulation R-value is R-49. The insulation thickness and types you stated above meet those.

    Homes need to be designed for all seasons in their climate zone. While the majority of the year in climate zone 7 is heating, wall assemblies need to be designed to dry year 'round. Polyethylene as a vapor retarder limits drying to the interior, which would be the path in what passes for summer in your part of the world. For what it's worth, the Building America Program's Best Practice Series Vol 3: Builders and Buyers Handbook for Improving New Home Efficiency, Comfort, and Durability in the Cold and Very Cold Climates says this about polyethylene vapor retarders:

    "Unless specifically required by local building code, a polyethylene vapor retarder (between the framing and the drywall) is not recommended because it limits a wall’s ability to dry to the inside."

    https://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy05osti/38309.pdf

    You'll be well served to install an "intelligent' vapor retarder which will result in a more forgiving and durable wall assembly.

  • aklogcabin
    Original Author
    2 months ago

    OK, I have installed 4" of pinkboard R-20 around the outer perimeter. And have pinkboard to install horizontally, 6 percent outward slope. To add around the outside perimeter.

    Exactly how the cold climate research center instructs except I added more, 4" totally around the perimeter. They had it 4' from the corners only. Was easier to cap when all the same width. Fairbanks requires a footing 16 in min. My inspector said I needed 18". I used 20" thick 24" wide. A monolithic floor. Followed the instructions from cold climate research center. Except made ours bigger because I had some fill on one end. And used 3500# cement.

    A vapor retarder is needed behind the pinkboard to stop moisture from entering the walls. This design is intended to dry to the outside. A rain screen of tyvex and 1x2 nailers creating a 3/4"gap. Behind the siding. If rain does enter it can still dry.

    In zones 6 up in particular, having walls dry to the outside is used quite a bit in scankik countries. The building techniques I'm using are from the cold climate research center. And I've not seen this method before. Hence my curiosity and questions.

  • Seabornman
    2 months ago

    Aklogcabin, maybe you have some pictures explaining the perimeter? The pics you've posted so far don't show that.

  • PRO
    Charles Ross Homes
    2 months ago

    "The building techniques I'm using are from the cold climate research center." I don't think you've complied fully with their recommendations. As Kevin9408 noted above, the ratio of R-values on each side of the vapor retarder is not in keeping with their recommendation. The reason we don't want a high R-value on the warm side of a vapor retarder is because the vapor retarder is the first condensing surface in the wall assembly. If the insulation on the warm side has a high R-value, it risks the temperature at the vapor retarder dropping to or below the condensation point.

    You will be better served with a higher R-value continuous insulation on the exterior and your wall assembly will be more forgiving with an "intelligent" vapor retarder.

  • David Cary
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    Ok, the political environment in AK allows homes to be built not even meeting IRC code. Doesn't really matter if technically they require it since the OP stated that builders there use 2x6 with batts only. And that is what he uses as his baseline to improve upon.

    Now what about the IRC (which of course comes from the ICC).

    One of the top sponsors to the ICC is the American Gas Association (top 3 right from the ICC's website). There are also reports of the NAHB having heavy influcence there - subject to a 2021 US Congress investigation. And the "I" is rather arrogant as it is a US-based cooperative with the entire board from the US.

    To be fair, the NAHB obviously wants to influence the ICC. Only natural. A builder would also want the ICC to be held in high regard.

    No one should believe this arrangement is best for the personal home buyer/individual build. The majority of homes are built on spec and the highest profit will always be made if the cost is lowest. And, yes, houses need to be affordable for people. But they also need to be affordable to heat/cool long term and that is not the primary concern to the builder/NAHB.

    Please correct any of my mistakes. And none of this means I know better what code should be or how to build a home safely. Just follow the money.

  • PRO
    Charles Ross Homes
    2 months ago

    "Ok, the political environment in AK allows homes to be built not even meeting IRC code"

    Alaska adopts a statewide building code. Review and enforcement varies from one locality to another just as it does in a number of other states with large rural areas. That's not politics; it's a practical matter.

  • PRO
    Charles Ross Homes
    2 months ago

    "And the "I" is rather arrogant as it is a US-based cooperative with the entire board from the US."

    Codes developed by the ICC have been adopted for use in a number of countries. That makes the word "International" legitimate. Here's a link indicating which ones:

    https://www.iccsafe.org/about/overview/international-code-adoptions/

    If you would like to promote more diversity on the ICC's board or committees developing specific codes, please contact the ICC.

  • kevin9408
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    You also seem resistant about using foam on the exterior because "no one else does it" and you believe it will trap moisture in the wall cavity. But using the right foam for the right application will give you a superior insulating factor and much better than those who don't insulate the exterior wall.

    You have two choices of foam with fundamental differences between the two, XPS (pink) and EPS (white,) and the type will decide how and where they should be used. The main difference is the perm rating (permance), and the higher the number the easier it is for water vapor as a gas can move through a material. To put this in perspective 6mil poly has a perm rating of 0.06 while an average house wrap has a Perm of 11 to allow water vapor to move through easily. Anything greater than 10 is considered Vapor permeable, anything between >1 to 10 is considered Vapor semi permeable,and below 1 is Vapor semi impermeable.

    XPS foam (pink) has a perm rating of 0..7 for 2" foam and is concidered semi impermeable and will work inside the house but only up to a third of the total wall insulation. Now lets move to EPS foam, it has a perm rating of 5, is semi permeable and perfectly acceptable for exterior of the house to allow water vapor to pass through at a lower rate.

    On the inside walls, with a Vapor impermeable barrier of 6 mil or thicker poly sealed well over a a layer of XPS that is caulked and taped around the nailers the rate of transmission of water vapor into the wall cavity of rockwool would be so low that the movement of vapor through the EPS foam on the exterior would be more than adequate. Water vapor as a gas will always seeks and moves to a dryer envioriment if it can and the EPS will allow this.

    On the flip side using XPS (pink) on the exterior would be a very unwise move because it's Semiimpermeable vs. EPS which is Semi permeable. You need a well sealed impermeable barrier inside the house and can't be half a job like your foundation is.

    I don'twant to hurt your feelings but the foundation insulation was half a job leaving the footings not insulated and like building half a dam. The energy of heat seeks to move from the warmer environment to the cooler environment and the rate it moves is dependent on the differential in temperature. The heat from your radiant tubing will lose more to the cooler environment below than it will radiate up and a big hole in your dam. The only thing you could (and did do) was insulate the vertical section of the footing and lay out wing insulation horizontally (with grade) to lower the differential in temperature and slow the heat loss. This where XPS (pink) foam come in play because it's absorption rate will only hold 0.3% water by volume compared to EPS which will hold up to 2% to 4% losing some insulation properties.

    If you decide to foam the outside I would recommend Type II EPS which has a higher density and stronger. I also recommend running nailers diagonally over the EPS for the siding and water wall. Whats a water wall if you have horizontal nailers holding water causing rot of the nailers? Diagonal will allow water to roll down. Windows and doors can remain the same but will need to be boxed with a good and watertight aluminum wrapping.

    Watch this video and there is a good example on how window boxes and window exterior flashing needs to be made.



    From what I've read someone has been telling you how to build your house with dated knowledge and sorry to see. Hopefully it's not to late in the build to make some changes.

    aklogcabin thanked kevin9408
  • kevin9408
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    The IRC developed by the ICC which is adopted by most of Alaska, and as Tim mentioned not political, unless referring to some states such as Calif. and NY. I don't think there is a state that hasn't adopted ICC codes, but the burden of enforcement is left to the counties or cities. This is from the IRC for the insulation around footings of a slab on grade and clear as a bell. Special note to the OP, if the indoor temperature isn't maintained at 64 degrees or more year round or you may have problems with heaving. I don't know what your air freezing index is but also note the requirements for the wing insulation and see if what you installed meets or exceeds the minimum.








  • aklogcabin
    Original Author
    2 months ago

    Thanks Kevin. Frost protected shallow foundation from the cold climate research center. And I just finished up getting the 4" xps pinkboard 250 installed around the entire perimeter. And have a stack of pinkboard r10 to install around the outer perimeter.

    While you're at the ccrc website search furring out a wall. Yes placing the insulation on the inside violates the 2/3 rule on insulation. The pinkboard on the inside in not taped because the vapor barrier behind it. The semi permeable pinkboard is only a vapor retarder and will not absorb moisture.

    This wall is intended to vent to the outside. With 1/2" cdx plywood and tyvex rain wall. 3/4" air gap screened on the top and bottom created by the 1x2 nailers installed on the studs 16"oc. Siding on top.

    The inside pinkboard is installed using minimal plastic washer headed nails. Then 5 rows of 1x4s installed horizontally with 1x4s installed over them vertically on the studs with 7 " timberlock screws. Making minimal holes in the vapor barrier. The windows and doors are furred out using 2x4s on edge, 3-1/2" directly to the rough framework around them. Doors will have a 3/4" boards glued n nailed to the edge of the door jams to extend them out. Fairly easy task. And I will not have to drill holes in the outer walls to pull wires or run utilities. No obstacles to insulate around. Just put it in n straighten it up. This reduces man hours for me also.

    I'm still building and finally got the roof finished. Carpenter's are booked and not available so I'm mostly a 1 man crew with help from family. Lot of work as I started with acre of trees. Well, septic, electrical utilities are all in. Now I can start drying things out. Then insulate. I will put our new fuel oil drip stove in, Kuma classic. Covid took a month.

    Again, I do realize that this is a non typical type of construction method. We have unique insulation needs, and I'm willing to try and do something better. And believe the methodology. And your comments make me challenge that, thanks.

    It was mentioned that I'm comparing this build to the average home built in our area. Guess I thought that would be appropriate. And yes the standard construction method in these parts is 2x6 walls with batt insulation. Some still using fiberglass insulation instead of rockwool. The only difference is that I'm adding the 2" pinkboard inside. And the furring strips for sheetrock.

    And yeppers tooooo late for changes in foundation. Our inspector said he was impressed with the work and it was do better then what he usually sees. The roofing contractor comments were all positive.

  • aklogcabin
    Original Author
    2 months ago

    I believe I remembered how to do pictures.

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  • PRO
    Charles Ross Homes
    2 months ago

    If you want to use the IRC as a reference for the required slab insulation, I believe you'll need to refer to table N1102.1.2 (d) since your slab is heated.

  • David Cary
    2 months ago

    So it is political when NY or CA make rules but it isn't political when jurisdictions choose not enforce the IRC? Interesting. Depends on your viewpoint I guess. You can enforce things in rural areas - I certainly hope the safety components are enforced.

  • PRO
    Charles Ross Homes
    2 months ago

    As a practical matter, rural communities may not have the financial resources to staff a codes compliance office so enforcement in those areas may be none at all.

  • PRO
    Floored You: TileDesigners
    2 months ago

    I live in a community where in the space of 50 miles one encounters the strictest of oversight, to zero oversight, for building. The county to the south that is rural and poor only requires a septic approval from the Health Department in order to build. They do not have the resources to employ a single building inspector. The wealthy county to the north has unbelievable red tape, and it adds many more months to the building process.


    The same nationally adopted codes exist in both locations. They are unenforceable in the rural location. Economics, not politics, are the reason. When only 15% of the county lives above the poverty line, there is no money for a lot of things that people who live in wealthier communities take for granted.

    aklogcabin thanked Floored You: TileDesigners
  • aklogcabin
    Original Author
    last month

    Thanks folks. I could care less about the political climate and how it affects how people build their homes. I will build a house better than the local requirements. Because it's my home.

    I've taken a few shots because I'm trying something new. Folks telling me that the foundation is poor n such. And insisting that I'm wrong in trying. Well I believe in the science behind this build. And it's not because, " well everybody else is doing that " kind of thing. I do my own things.

    Anyhows, I don't mind trying new things and trying to get the best I can. I still enjoy any feedback. Hopefully we can get the moisture level in the studs down a bit more so the insulation can go in. The ground is freezing so any dirt work needs to happen. A friend will bring his bobcat over n take care of that.

    This little house has been a fun project. I'm not the young man I used to be but feel blessed that I can take a little more time n enjoy the process. Getting materials is hard. And choices can be few.

    Thanks folks

  • Seabornman
    last month

    Aklogcabin, I see in your latest pics you added insulation on outside of foundation above grade. Does that extend below grade? Did you extend horizontally? I'm worried frost will heave the slab edge.

  • aklogcabin
    Original Author
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Yes the 4" of pinkboard extends down 16". I have pinkboard to go around the outside perimeter horizontally but ran out of time this year. I think I'll be ok , it's amazing how many homes are built without insulation. The mass of the cement and the amount of heat in it will keep any freezing from happening.

    I already have more than local code requirements in cities. Such as anchorage Fairbanks