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My Thomas Becket (David Austin) rose is dying. Anyone know why?

Darragh Worledge
2 months ago
last modified: 2 months ago

Was planted late September two years ago. That year it was glorious. The rose was in a three gallon pot, quite large and was a show stopper in the garden. Next year it did well, with flowers and new growth. This year, which has been the worst year for weather pretty much ever, we are into mid July with rain every second day, it looks dead. There's been very little, to no sun. Right now it is 18c., so very cold for July. Thomas Becket has no new growth, one flower, every cane is black and dead looking. Every other rose in my garden, and I have over 100 rose bushes and climbers, are doing fine except this rose. Any ideas?

Comments (56)

  • Darragh Worledge
    Original Author
    2 months ago

    Hi Sheila. It's possible I suppose that the tree is taking some nutrients from the rose, however on the other side of the tree at about the same distance are two other roses which are doing fine. Mountain Ash is a greedy tree to a certain extent, ususally up to around three to five feet out from base. Beyond that you can grow things. It isn't like Leyland Cypress which actually seems to poison the soil. The Thomas Becket rose did just fine for a year and a half, then suddenly this year it is dying with no new growth. I agree that digging it up is likely a good move.

  • roseseek
    2 months ago

    Darragh, for a rose to turn "black", it has too much water. That water has either drowned (suffocated) it, or the combination of too much water and too cool temperatures have provided the necessary conditions for some opportunistic fungal or bacterial issue to kill the plant. If it had dried up, the plant would have lightened, most often turning beige as it dries out. Your observation that it is "black" means it has too much water, whether that is due to the heavy rains you report or perhaps the UNDERGROUND drainage which can often have little to do with the surface slope. Just because water runs off the surface doesn't necessarily mean it soaks THROUGH the soil efficiently. From what you wrote, both roses are on their own roots and not budded to a common root stock. If the Rugosa is doing well, and Becket is rotting, without any physical investigative work, the only conclusions possible are that Becket's roots aren't as durable against the high rains soil moisture as the Rugosa's; the Rugosa is more tolerant of colder, wetter conditions (very likely the case); the drainage under Becket is not as efficient as it is under the Rugosa; Becket is more susceptible to whatever disease attacked it or the conditions in its particular hole are worse and more conducive to that or those pathogens than where the Rugosa roots are. As Sheila suggested, dig it up and do an autopsy.


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  • Darragh Worledge
    Original Author
    2 months ago

    Roseseek, the Thomas Becket rose isn't rotting. It may well have a fungal infection, but there is no rot anywhere. Trust me when I say my soil is VERY FAST DRAINING. Having lived at this address for over 20 years, I know this soil very well. We have just changed out the water line to house in a different part of the garden which required workers to dig down 20" into the soil. Even they commented about how sandy this soil is. It is reclaimed forest silt mixed with sand and small stones. No perimeter drains are needed to take water away from the house, The downspouts drain directly into the soil and disperse without any problem. To grow anything here, copious amounts of humus in the form of peatmoss, manure and compost have to be added to the base soil just to hold water. Normally in summer the soil droughts down to over three feet into the soil with powder dry conditions down that far at least. This year we have retained soil moisture due to incessant rain. I haven't had to water virtually at all. As rose canes age, they turn black and die back. New shoots sprout and replace the old ones. The rose in question has had massive die back but nothing new to replace the old canes.

  • bart bart
    2 months ago

    Well, I'm by no means an expert,but since Darragh asked for "any ideas" I'll throw this one out:


    "Normally in summer the soil droughts down to over three feet into the soil with powder dry conditions down that far at least. This year we have retained soil moisture due to incessant rain. I haven't had to water virtually at all." Could the plant be suffering from a sort of shock? unable to cope with such a drastic difference in it's environment? Roseseek is most definitely an expert, yet I must admit that I find the remark "for a rose to turn "black", it has too much water" a bit too reductive or something. For example, I'm getting a lot of summer die-back on several recently-planted roses. Since I can't observe the plants day by day (they are out at my land), I can't describe the process of the die-back,but the canes do turn black. My impression is that it starts off as a yellowing, then turns to black,and that probably what is going on is that the plants in question don't (yet?) have a sufficiently developed root system to support all the top growth that was made in the past, when the temperature wasn't so extremely hot, the sun was less cruel, and the soil had not yet dried out completely . Understand that I DO water these plants,but I just don't think that that is enough to counter-balance the awful heat and burning sun and seemingly endless days. So , the plants are stressed out from the shock. (I fervantly hope that they will survive this dreadful summer and bounce back). But I doubt that the kind of shock from which my plants may be suffering is the only kind of shock that exists! and, no, NOT all of the new implants are manifesting these symptoms ,nor do those that do manifest them do so to the same degree. So, in a way, roseseek could be right in saying that Darragh's plant may be getting too much water, but not perhaps in the sense of lack of decent drainage, etc.

    I agree with Sheila's idea of digging it up and putting it in a pot. It sounds like the plant is just going so steadily down-hill that it might be the only chance to possibly save it.

    Darragh Worledge thanked bart bart
  • kidhorn2
    2 months ago

    Doesn't seem lack of water is the issue, so planted too close to a tree is out. Canes turning black is cane rot. The canes have a bacteria that is eating the cane. Regardless of the cause, the canes are rotting. Could be caused by too much water, but I doubt it if the soil drains. Too much water doesn't kill directly. It's lack of oxygen that kills.


    I would try to dig around the roots and aerate the soil. Make sure there's enough oxygen getting to the roots. I do this a lot with mature roses. I'm sure many would think this is blasphemy. Killing roots or destroying the biota or some other nonsense. I put down some osmocote and dig into the ground a few inches. Flip the dirt and stab it with a shovel to loosen it. Then cover it with a couple of inches of mulch. Obviously, don't go over board and completely dig up the rose. Always seems to help.

    Darragh Worledge thanked kidhorn2
  • rifis (zone 6b-7a NJ)
    2 months ago

    Give detailed description of its condition in March, April, May and June of this year, and provide photos of its current state, please.

    Darragh Worledge thanked rifis (zone 6b-7a NJ)
  • Darragh Worledge
    Original Author
    2 months ago



    Okay, here are a couple of pictures of the rose. As to it's condition in March, April, May and June, I haven't a clue to be honest because the weather was so cold and wet I couldn't get out into the garden to check anything. I can see finished flower hips so it had a few flowers, perhaps eight. There is one flower at the moment. What there isn't, is any new growth at all.


  • Darragh Worledge
    Original Author
    2 months ago

    I would also add I am in Zone 8, on Vancouver Island. We normally have a very mild, modified Mediterranean climate. This year I have turned the heat on three times in July! That has never happened before.


  • Darragh Worledge
    Original Author
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago



    Here's a picture of the other rose growing the same distance from the Mountain Ash tree. As you can see it is healthy. Good green leaves and had lots of flowers. This rose is growing in exactly the same conditions as the rose that is dying. Both roses have had the same care, which this year means none at all as I am just getting out into the garden now in mid July. I haven't even weeded this area of the garden yet. Am hoping to get weeding done over the next week, weather permitting, which it isn't doing as it is STILL RAINING! In July.

  • Darragh Worledge
    Original Author
    2 months ago


    Here's Julia Child rose growing up to deck, taken today. Healthy.

  • Darragh Worledge
    Original Author
    2 months ago


    This is Maurice Utrillo rose today. Even it is healthy and this is a finickity rose.

  • Darragh Worledge
    Original Author
    2 months ago


    An overview of the front area that still need to be weeded. However the roses are healthy in general. Heritage Dorothy Perkins rose on arbor at front entrance.

  • Darragh Worledge
    Original Author
    2 months ago


    Sweet Mademoiselle rose with another two varieties of roses. Taken today in the back part of the garden where new water line is being installed. As seen, all healthy.

  • Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR
    2 months ago

    Let us know when you dig up the ailing rose what the roots look like. Take a photo to help us understand. I'm glad your other roses are doing well.

    Darragh Worledge thanked Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR
  • jerijen
    2 months ago

    Looks to me like a gopher ate the roots.

  • Darragh Worledge
    Original Author
    2 months ago

    Hi jerijen. No gophers here so that's not it.


  • bart bart
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    From what I can see in the first photo of the ailing rose, there are still quite a few nice green canes on it. So if this picture is accurate I'd probably dig it up and try growing it on in a pot,where one can regulate conditions with more precision. If instead the second photo is the more realistic one (in this, I can only make out one dying cane),it looks like a losing battle.

    The summer die-back which I mentioned in my post on this thread does indeed look very similar to the cane shown in photo #2. I myself don't intend to dig up all of the roses showing this, because most of them do have younger, leafy canes at their bases. The exception I think is Twilight Zone; that has I think no leaves at all on it. But there are green canes,and, what's more, I see that the TZ I have here in a pot at the house has behaved in a similar way, though less dramatically-but then conditions at the house (regular watering and afternoon shade) are less dramatic than those out at my land. So I do think that different varieties of rose will act in different ways. This potted TZ looked like it was growing happily last year, so I put it into a larger pot, only to find that it had not developed new roots to fill said larger pot, so I had to down-size it again. Some roses just seem to take longer than others to establish.

    In your case, it's only one plant that seems to be sulking; if photo # 1 is accurate, it doesn't look to me like it is necessarily dying.

    Darragh Worledge thanked bart bart
  • Darragh Worledge
    Original Author
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    Hi bart bart. Both photos are accurate in that there are still some green canes but many canes have gone black, especially in the upper part of the cane. There are still a few leaves on the plant, very tired looking. What isn't happening is new growth sprouting anywhere. Generally roses sprout new growth to replace the older growth, which is then removed. This rose even though it should be established by a year and half in the ground, with this year making two full years, isn't acting like an established rose. It is just sitting there getting rattier looking. I'm going to dig it up as soon as the rest of the garden is weeded, which a friend of mine is helping with. I've trimmed back some of the poor and skinny canes from the problem rose yesterday, as we got that bed weeded. I'd leave Thomas Becket rose in the ground, but it is in a very prominent location at the back of a bed that creates the background of lower garden. So I don't want an almost dead plant there. I've purchased Amadeus rose which is a red climber. Would that work in this spot? Don't know if Amadeus would work as a shrub, or be too spindly to do so? There isn't much of a selection of roses left locally to choose from. Have bought Laguna too which I know grows fine as a shrub, seeing as I've used it so in another part ot the garden. Do you know either of these roses? They are Kordes bred roses, so very resistant to disease. I have a no spray garden which means roses need to have good to excellent disease resistance to grow well here.

  • Darragh Worledge
    Original Author
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago



    I took another look with the weeds are gone, and now realize that Thomas Becket is a bud grafted rose. This is likely why we are having problems. Sometimes the root stock, almost always Dr. Huey, doesn't take in my soil for some reason. I hadn't realized this shrub rose was bud grafted. So I'm thinking this is the problem. The root stock simply doesn't like my soil. As well, there is only that small area of featured rose to generate growth from, which makes for a weak rose. Which is why I really don't like bud grafted roses and avoid them as much as possible.

  • Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR
    2 months ago

    All the better to pot this rose then if the root stock does not like your soil. Use a good potting mix.

  • stillanntn6b
    2 months ago

    Does your Mountain Ash have any symptoms of virus on its leaves?

    Plants can graft one to another (not even same genus) underground.


    The soil you have....doesn't reak of the anoxic back canals of Bangkok?

  • jacqueline9CA
    2 months ago

    Darragh - if you dig it up, in addition cutting off all of the dead parts and planting it in a large pot in good potting soil, I would root some cuttings, if there are enough green bits to do that. Then you will eventually get a plant on its own roots, and you can see how that does. I agree with you - all of the budded plants I have had (when I did not know better) were on Dr. Huey except one, and in each case I ended up HATING Dr. Huey, and got rid of it - which took a while. Here the problem was not the root stock hating our soil, but was that is was WAY too happy, and kept sending up suckers over and over, and trying to kill off the scion. Then, the Dr. Huey parts above they ground got horrible fungal diseases. Yuck.


    Jackie

    Darragh Worledge thanked jacqueline9CA
  • Darragh Worledge
    Original Author
    2 months ago

    That Dr. Huey is a horrible rootstock all right, Jacqueline. Here on Vancouver Island we do get summer warmth that Dr. Huey likes, but it is combined with nasty, wet and cold winters. The last two winters have dropped to -15C. which is 5 F. for a few days at a time. The combination of wet and cold, the rootstock doesn't like at all. When you add my thin, nutrient poor soil to the mix, Dr. Huey can simply refuse to grow into the ground. I've had it happen before. Unfortunately, I haven't mastered the art of rooting rose cuttings. I'd love to have own rooted Thomas Becket rose. But don't trust my ability to do it.

  • Darragh Worledge
    Original Author
    2 months ago

    Stillann, the Mountain Ash tree is quite healthy. Nor will Mountain Ash graft to a rose under any conditions, the plants are too dissimilar genetically. I'm not sure what your Bangkok comment was in reference to. However no, there is no reek of anything nasty in my garden. In fact, the roses and honesuckle perfume the air beautifully.

  • stillanntn6b
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    The anoxic smell can happen in patches underground even through the surface is sweet. I've gardened in several places with several centuries of habitation, and the things that got buried were never predicted.

    I ask about Mountain Ash because European Mountain Ash harbors a virus named for the ash, EMARA virus the first plant which that particular virus was found on. (EMARA is european mountain ash associated ringspot, if you are wondering what the other letters stand for An Ash up in Canada was planted next to a rose that came down with rather hideous symptoms and may have been one of the first North American roses infected with a disease we now call Rose Rosette virus which is categorized as and Emaravirus. A similar virus on a Royal Pawlonia tree in China just happens to have wiped out a rose garden in China that is across a small walkway from the Pawlonia.

    Darragh Worledge thanked stillanntn6b
  • Darragh Worledge
    Original Author
    2 months ago

    Interesting, stillann. Not relevant in this situation. As said, there are no viruses in either the rose or the tree. There are always fungus attacks such as blackspot. That is different than a virus which goes into the tissues of the plant. With a fungus attack, there is leaf and sometimes stem dieback, then new healthy growth replaces the damaged areas. A virus infecting a plant means the entire plant must be removed and burned as it doesn't go away and can spread to other genetically similar plants. So again to repeat, this is not the situation here. As to an anoxic smell, that refers to a lack of oxygen, I believe. To again emphaize, my soil is very fast draining. A mixture of sand, small rocks and a smigeon of forest silt. This type of soil matrix is FULL of oxygen at all times, including immediately after water saturates it. The problem with this type of soil is to RETAIN water. As you know, as soon as water goes away in the spaces of soil matrix, air immediately replaces it. So it would be extremely improbable to have a situation here that needed a lack of oxygen to happen. What we do have I believe is a root stock that hates my soil, so has refused to grow properly into it.

  • Paul Barden
    2 months ago

    "What we do have I believe is a root stock that hates my soil, so has refused to grow properly into it."


    If you believe this is the issue, then remove the plant and replace it with one better suited to your conditions. There's no point trying to coax an ailing plant to grow in a site its not right for.

    Darragh Worledge thanked Paul Barden
  • Darragh Worledge
    Original Author
    2 months ago

    Once the garden is weeded, the ailing rose will be dug up and replaced, Paul. Right now I have a choice between Laguna climber which is growing in another part of the garden as a shrub, and Amadeus climbing rose which I do not know the growth habit of. Both of these plants are bred by Kordes who feature own root, disease resistant roses. Are you familiar with either of these varieties? The question now is would Amadeus grow as a shrub, or be too flexible of cane to self support?

  • bart bart
    2 months ago

    Laguna is a good rose in my garden, but keep in mind that my soil and climate seem to be VERY different from yours, Darragh. However, you say that you do have one growing elsewhere in your garden. I don't know Amadeus.

    Darragh Worledge thanked bart bart
  • Darragh Worledge
    Original Author
    2 months ago

    I do have a Laguna growing as a shrub in my garden. It grows well but so far has been skimpy with the flowers. Amadeus is bred by Kordes along with Laguna. It is supposed to be red in colour. I'm trying to find out how sturdy the canes will be with Amadeus to see if it would be self supporting grown as a shrub. The spot will go to one or the other of these roses. Almost finished weeding.

  • Darragh Worledge
    Original Author
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    I have dug up Thomas Becket rose and potted it. The root system is actually quite well developed, so the theory of rootstock not liking soil doesn't seem as likely. So why the rose is declining and refusing to grow remains a mystery. We'll see how it does in the pot. It showed no signs of drooping or otherwise even noticing being dug up. It's as if the rose is comotose. With help from my friend, garden is finally weeded and tidied. Better late than never I guess, and just in time to be able to water during our heat wave. I've chosen Amandeus rose to replace Thomas Becket. It's planted.

  • jacqueline9CA
    2 months ago

    Would love to see pictures of both your newly planted Amadeus, and your newly potted Thomas Becket. Both photos should be from far enough away to show the surrounding plants, fences (if any), paths, etc.


    One thought on your newly dug up and potted Thomas Becket. I would leave it alone (after you remove all dead growth), except of course for water, if needed. Then, hopefully in a couple of months, it should start putting out new growth. Only when it does that would I suggest you feed it (follow the directions for roses in pots on any fertilizer labeled for roses). My thought is that perhaps the relentless rain and sandy soil washed all of the nutrients out of the soil. If, as I think you said above, you removed old growth each year when new canes emerged, perhaps it just got exhausted from having to replace all of its growth with not enough nutrients in the soil. In a pot with good potting soil, that should not happen, especially if you can protect it from too much rain, if that is still happening.


    Jackie

    Darragh Worledge thanked jacqueline9CA
  • Darragh Worledge
    Original Author
    2 months ago

    All sensible thoughts and suggestions, Jacqueline. Thomas Becket is in a large pot positioned under an overhang which gets some sun protection. I often use this spot to grow potted roses. The thought that the plant might need more nutrients is valid, though in my experience and referencing many other roses in my garden, a healthy rose here is generally fine without supplemental feeding. Rose food does promote extra flowers. But I am unsure of the modern bred roses; concerned that they might be genetically predisposed to need additional food. Any plant that can't get by with just dirt, I consider to be not a garden adapted plant. You see this a lot with heucheras, all the fancy types. Some simply don't grow properly when put in the garden. As to the weather. We are now in the flip phase where we've gone from cold, no sun and constant rain, to 33 C. which is 91 degrees F. All this within a week's time. As well, no rain now and constant sun. So that's a shift from about 14 C. or 57 F. to 91 F. in a week or so. We are predicted to drop back to mid '70's F. next week. Global warming has made our summers hotter and the temperature swings more extreme.

  • Darragh Worledge
    Original Author
    2 months ago



    Here is Amadeus rose newly planted two days ago.

  • Darragh Worledge
    Original Author
    2 months ago


    Thomas Becket planted in a pot.

  • Darragh Worledge
    Original Author
    2 months ago


    Here's the wide view of Amadeus newly planted in bed.

  • jacqueline9CA
    2 months ago

    Darragh - thanks for the pics! One thought about Amadeus - if, some day in the future, it starts putting out climbing canes (may take 2-3 years for it to get going - "first year sleeping, second year creeping, third year leaping" being a good description of the behavior of climbing roses), they might get in the way of that nearby path. That is happening to us in my new fenced in deer proof garden. What we decided to do (as true climbing roses will do fine without any supports, but left to themselves they tend to become large mounds, and our path is too close for that) is to build ours a structure to let it climb up the structure, and over the path, to the top of a fence on the other side. I note there appears to be a large structure in your garden on the other side of the path - that would be a good "target" for Amadeus to aim for. Then it could grow on that larger structure. Just a thought in case it gets too large in the future. Just a thought.


    Re some food for your Thomas Becket in its new pot, if you potted it in commercial potting or planting soil, they contain plant food, so it should be OK. If you potted it in only in the very sandy garden soil, it still might like some food, but only after it recuperates from being dug up, and starts putting out new growth.


    Jackie

    Darragh Worledge thanked jacqueline9CA
  • Darragh Worledge
    Original Author
    2 months ago

    Hi Jackie. I'm hoping Amadeus will grow as a large shrub rather than a rambler rose with very long canes. Only time will tell, as no one was able to give me an idea as to growth habit. I don't want it to go over to the pergola on the left as that structure has it's own roses planted for it. As to the soil Thomas Becket is potted in. I never use my garden soil to pot roses, it is far too thin. The rose is potted in a mixture of bagged garden soil and peatmoss. Again, I don't feed roses that much. Nor would I leave Thomas Becket or any rose for that matter, growing in a pot for the long term. Experience has shown me that after year two, they rapidly decline. Roses need to reach their roots deep into the soil to do well here. If they can't or won't, then they decline and eventually die.

  • susan9santabarbara
    2 months ago

    The reason your potted roses rapidly decline after year two is because you don't fertilize them. I grow >200 roses in 15 gallon pots, and they do extremely well.

  • jacqueline9CA
    2 months ago

    I think that in the thin, sandy soil you describe in your garden, it would be good to give Thomas Becket some food when you plant him in the ground again. I use Osmacote, which is time release granules - I only put it on once a year, and all of my roses love it. Our soil is excellent clay based loam which has been gardened for 117 years by my DH's family, but the roses still appreciate some fertilizer.


    I do agree with Susan that roses can thrive in pots, but they take more care that way, so I don't leave mine in pots more than 1 or 2 years.


    Jackie

  • bart bart
    2 months ago

    Totally agree with Jackie. Growing roses in pots takes a lot of care,it seems to me , and though it clearly can be done,I can't see myself doing it.

    Darragh, I'm not sure what your climate is like, but from the page on HMF, it doesn't seem to me that Amadeus would tend to get all that big. https://www.helpmefind.com/rose/l.php?l=2.39720

    Keep in mind that it's not a rambler at all, but a "Large-flowered Climber",and as a general rule these "LFCs" tend to have a very different habit from that of ramblers. This latter group of roses ,though not vines,often have a sort of more vine-like nature to them,in the sense that they can be kind of unruly and sprawling.

  • Darragh Worledge
    Original Author
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    Exactly bart bart. I used the term rambler when addressing the suggestion that Amadeus might need a support structure to not sprawl over the path. It was suggested to direct the rose growth over to a pergola located on the next path. Seeing as that structure is well over 10 feet away from newly planted Amadeus, the only type of rose that would grow such long canes is a rambler type. Which is why I said Amadeus isn't a rambler, and I am trying to grow it as a shrub of hopefully five-ish feet or so. Again, for me growing roses in pots isn't successful. They don't like it. As to them simply needing lots of plant food to succeed, I would suggest climate would also play into the situation. Here we have temperature fluctuations, going from well below freezing in winter, to extremely hot in summer, and yoyoing back and forth during the growing season. Rose roots in general perfer to be cool. They don't get that in pots. My style of gardening is to mimic nature in that I try to grow plants as naturally as possible. Supplemental watering is necessary during our hot, dry season, especially with the fast draining soil in my garden. However I use no chemicals at all. This does include synthetic plant food. However I will bend the no chemical plant food rule for the roses, occasionally. Certainly no other plant growing in my garden ever gets plant food added to the soil. They all grow well as is shown by the enormous weed pile accumulated this year. I will also state as shown above, most of my roses, and I grow over 100 plants, are doing very well. Therefore when one declines as Thomas Becket has, I want to know why. Hence this thread.

  • Darragh Worledge
    Original Author
    2 months ago


    A star in my garden right now is this lovely phlox. I've grown this variety for around five years. It does extremely well, growing organically without added plant food or sprays of any sort. This variety is highly mildew resistant. If there is no fungus this year, there never will be. And there isn't. Growing genetically strong plants is very important to my philosophy of gardening. They are either strong enough to grow in the conditions planted in, or they are not. If not, out they go.

  • jacqueline9CA
    2 months ago

    Darragh - I was wondering - how is Thomas Becket doing in its pot?


    Jackie

  • Darragh Worledge
    Original Author
    2 months ago

    Hi Jackie. Thanks for checking back. Thomas Becket has sprouted out three sets of new leaves in the pot! So it has broken dormancy. I decided to completely redo the lower garden after this horrid spring / early summer we had. When digging in the area that Thomas Becket was growing, I realized the soil there had reverted back to something resembling brown sand. Just horrible. One other area of the garden had done the same. So everything has been amended with bagged garden soil, and completely new plants put in. I'll be keeping Thomas Becket in the pot and hope in a month or so he can be planted into another rose bed in a different part of the garden. So it was a soil problem after all. I have really atrocious base soil to work with.

  • bart bart
    last month

    Glad to hear this good news,Darragh. I have atrocious soil, too, but it's atrocious in a different way from yours.

  • jacqueline9CA
    last month

    Sounds like the rain continuously washed any amendments, and any nutrients, out of the soil where Thomas Becket used to be. So, it was basically starving. Glad it is doing so well, and that you will be planting it in a better place when it recovers.


    Jackie

  • Darragh Worledge
    Original Author
    last month

    Oh how pretty! What a wonderful photo, jc. Thank you so much for sharing. The red color is delightful on Amadeus rose from the look of your plant.

  • jc_7a_MiddleTN
    last month

    The color is great and the flowers last quite a while