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toronado3800

Neat happenings this year?

I have two things. I actually noticed a low cone forming on my Metasequoia Ogon and my Cladastis kentukea is actually going to flower this year.


What have you all been waiting for that's coming to be>



Comments (71)

  • ViburnumValley central KY Bluegrass z6
    2 months ago

    ...and all in a lawn of Poa pratensis...

  • maackia
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    Nice yellowwood specimen! However, I think what's missing in that picture is a vine. Have you considered Wisteria macrostachya?

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  • bengz6westmd
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    Viburnum, nice KCT flower pic -- out in the open. And your yellowwod is stunning. In keeping w/the pea family, honeylocust flowers a week or two ago. The bees were buzzing...



  • ViburnumValley central KY Bluegrass z6
    2 months ago

    The Yellowwood is celebrating 25 years. I planted that at my wife's workplace in 1997, and it's been rewarding to watch it mature. This species is hard to beat overall for showy blooms, smooth gray bark on vase-shaped arching habit, and golden fall foliage.


    The Kentucky Coffee Tree is the male selection Prairie Titan® ('J. C. McDaniel'), and with low branches on the tree by my front walk at Viburnum Valley, I've been able to observe these flowers annually. It is one of 5 I planted as bare root liners from a local nurseryman before the trade name was assigned. You have to be looking for these blooms - despite their overall large size - because of their grayish blue color just doesn't leap out of the background of foliage. I hope you all will enjoy your blooms as they occur.


    Kentucky Viburnum is just rare around here, so I'm happy that I finally have some plants achieving size and bloom. I'm hoping to find additional provenance for better cross pollination and fruit production.


    And, no thank you to ANY Wisteria sp. I have planted Wisteria frutescens 'Amethyst Falls', and it has become a monster (think Audrey II) that i'm trying to kill off.

  • bengz6westmd
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    Yeah, vines can become monsters, even English ivy. I've battled trumpet vine for years where I planted it in an unfortunate location -- in front of my house. The roots are everywhere and very hard to kill. Here's the oldest of my KCTs several yrs ago -- planted in a pile of rocks that make my parking spot.



  • maackia
    2 months ago

    Mmm, this organization has a different opinion. I’ve never grown Wisteria of any kind, so I’m completely neutral on this.

  • ViburnumValley central KY Bluegrass z6
    2 months ago

    I'm sure the VNPS is full of very nice people, but please: 33 years of Wildflower of the Year, and not a single Viburnum? And only one oak?


    Outranked by Skunk Cabbage...!

  • Christopher CNC
    2 months ago

    This post has caused a bit of tree lust and envy. Alas, I live in the forest and have no room or sunlight for trees. I do have a tree story y'all might enjoy.

    When I arrived here the large groves of hemlocks were a year away from dead from the adelgid. I let someone log as many as they wanted on the slope below the hole in the forest for my house. The death and removal of the hemlocks created a huge opening of sunlight in the forest and the race to fill it was on.

    What came up where oak, maple, locust, poplar, birch, cherry and.... with blackberry of course. Something else that came up that I didn't see much of in my travels were a couple dozen Magnolia fraseri. The Devil's Walking Stick, Aralia spinosa also showed up. Birds had been sitting in those hemlocks for decades.



    Over the years I have been cutting down the saplings I don't want on an annual basis and the blackberry of course to establish a grove full of the Magnolia fraseri. It also contains the Aralia spinosa, couple Chestnut oaks, even two Magnolia acuminata.


    The Devil's Walking Stick has been spreading like running bamboo. I am not sure if it is from seed or rhizomes. I may have to start putting a halt to it.



  • maackia
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    Go skunk cabbage! Must it always come back to viburnums? ;)

    Interesting tree story. A grove of M. fraseri? Now there’s something I’ve never seen. Natures hand with a bit of human touch?

  • ViburnumValley central KY Bluegrass z6
    2 months ago

    Aralia spinosa is all about suckering from its root system. I have it popping up all over the area radiating out from where I planted an individual under a group of Eastern White Pines.


    The roots are pretty shallow. I suspect if you were to dig around one of those stems, you will find a root extending in either direction. I will be amazed if I ever find a seedling.


    i've not pursued, but it would be interesting to know whether Devil's Walkingstick is poor at self pollination. All my stems will have been clonal. If I added new provenance, would all the giant showy flowering heads then have fecundity? Would germinating seeds be worse than all the suckering stems coming up in undesirable places?


    North Carolina has an unhealthy wealth of great native plants. Christopher CNCmust cease agonizing over the excess diversity of native plants thriving in his landscape.


  • ViburnumValley central KY Bluegrass z6
    2 months ago

    Instead of whining about Christopher CNC's embarrassment of riches, I'll return to the premise of this thread: images of emergence.


    Here are some of Aralia spinosa...






  • L Clark (zone 4 WY)
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago



    Oregon Green candles. After a few years of pathetic growth it seems to be back on track

  • davidrt28 (zone 7)
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    It's always pleasing when a plant gets back on track, isn't it? I feel that way currently about my Trachycarpus fortunei. The only surviving of 3. A plant I must stress I'm just "not that into", but hey, it is the most hardy arborescent palm. And has the potential to look good if well grown, although I detest the look of ratty or unhappy ones. Unfortunately I'm not even sure which form it is anymore, over the years I have ordered 'Hayes Stiffy', 'Tennessee form' and 'Takil' from Plant Delights. I think it's probably the Tennessee form. Not protecting them during the cold spells this winter was a turning point, although I'd only planted them out about 3 years ago, they had to prove themselves. One died, or at last was so damaged there was no sense in letting it struggle back, if 7F had done that to it! There was only really room for one in that SW facing alcove, anyhow.

    A winter like 1994 would surely kill any unprotected Trachy up here, so I'm not considering it a forever plant.

  • Christopher CNC
    2 months ago

    The Devil's Walking Stick on reconnaissance runners. I was afraid of that. I have seen it loaded with berries and the birds mobbing it once. The Aralia racemosa sets fruit every year.

  • L Clark (zone 4 WY)
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    Yes, David, it’s always great when a plant turns a corner for the better . So many times there’s only one way for a plant to go…. down.


    Trachycarpus forttunii reminds me of British people and Monty Don

    Toronado3800 Zone 6 St Louis thanked L Clark (zone 4 WY)
  • BillMN-z-2-3-4
    2 months ago

    First cones on my 7 yo Pinus Strobus. :)



  • Garen Rees
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    Love this thread. Great stuff everyone.

    Aesculus hippocastanum ‘Wiselink' The lack of chlorophyll in this one makes the leaves look like they have a silver sheen.



    My first Viburnum

    Viburnum lantana ‘Variegatum’





    Acer palmatum 'Mystic Mikawa' looking nice and chunky



  • BillMN-z-2-3-4
    2 months ago

    Wow! Garen, you sure show the 'Masters touch'.

    Thanks for posting! :-)

  • maackia
    last month
    last modified: last month

    I’m enjoying the pictures! Thank you toronado for starting it.

    This Korean Fir has been a joy to watch grow. It also produced its first cones this year. Hardy and beautiful!








  • BillMN-z-2-3-4
    last month

    Flower buds appearing on Ilex verticilatta seedlings, planted last summer.


  • bengz6westmd
    last month
    last modified: last month

    I had planted a dozen ginkgo seeds in 2004 and maybe 6 or so sprouted. Let them grow a couple yrs then transplanted out in several places. The one in the mowed yard has grown well, a slim 25 ft tall now. Others were planted in unmowed areas & all died as it was too hard to weed them (weeds would grow 6 ft+ tall in those areas). This yr I was poking around before the weeds got too tall and discovered the below in a spot I had long forgotten. It was in the ground for over 14 yrs, and somehow put a sprout out from the surviving roots.



    Abies holophylla, Manchurian fir, with long sprouts this yr since it escaped the usual late frosts. Alot of sprouts everywhere as it has had alot of twig damage from the frosts in past yrs.



  • maackia
    last month

    I'm envious of your Manchurian Fir. I left a small one behind at my old place, and it was doing well when I moved. There was a nice specimen at Morton Arb when I visited several years ago, but they are almost non-existent in the nursery trade. Cold hardy, heat tolerant, and attractive: What more could you ask for?

  • bengz6westmd
    last month
    last modified: last month

    maackia, its near fatal issue is susceptibility to late frost, which I'm prone to here. On a plus side, its in heavy, rather poorly-drained clay and doesn't mind that.

    To add, my supposedly 90% plus Amer chestnut hybrid from OIKOS has finally bloomed after 16 yrs or so (more blooms up higher). It does get some lower branch death, but seems like it will weather the chestnut blight.





  • L Clark (zone 4 WY)
    last month

    Speaking of chestnuts, any new news on how the restorarion of the american chestnut is going?

  • bengz6westmd
    last month
    last modified: last month

    LClark, I actually did a search and it looks like there's a number of places offering hybrid American chestnuts now. So they're becoming more available. Still, I don't know if these are capable of surviving and reproducing in the wild yet.

  • BillMN-z-2-3-4
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Wait! Did I say pollen cone? On the very terminal end of the main trunk?

    Sheesh It's a Seed Cone! And it should help me finalize identification of what I think is a Pinus Ponderosa scopulorum (well I'm already pretty sure it is). :))


    Only trouble is, they take two years to make a ripe cone.

    I did find an 'Internet' picture of Jeffrey pine immature cone that may or may not be reliable but comparing it to mine does make mine look a bit 'Pricklier' so most likely mine is P. ponderosa scopulorum. :-)

    eta: I was comparing my cone to pictures of both a Jeffrey pine and Pinus p. scopulorum immature cones and mine does look more like the scopulorum. Sorry for any confusion. :-)

  • ViburnumValley central KY Bluegrass z6
    last month

    Do I detect some giddiness from MN...


    "Must it always come back to viburnums..." Awww...have a:



    It WAS a great day to document ID details...



    And sometimes, you just discover delight...







  • maackia
    last month

    That last picture is making me giddy.

  • BillMN-z-2-3-4
    last month
    last modified: last month

    I did get a little excited about the cone but I've been waiting almost 7 years! ;-)

    I just put this Hydrangea macrophylla in, it was a memorial gift for my wifes cousin who recently passed. It's been blooming since I planted it 6-1-22. Endless summer 'bloom struck'. We'll see if it makes our winters. If they were all like last year with abundant early snow, I'd have it made.


    My Paeonia Lactiflora x Paeonia Officinalis has performed great even though it went through snowless winters and has pushed buds early. The frosts haven't seemed to affect this one. I think the wife stole bloom #7 before I got this picture. :)


    Syringa reticulata has survived exposed winters and now at year #5 is ready to put on a show.


    Taxus hicksii too has grown well since moved year before last. Picture a week old and recent rains have accelerated it's growth. (ignore the deer protection).


    The heavy early snow made for a damage free winter for almost everything in the yard.

    On the more zone hardy side:

    Larix laricina, 3rd summer in the ground, started from seed.


    Picea mariana from seed, 3rd season too. It is a nice blue green but my camera does this on cloudy days. Seems like it makes everything look more blue.


  • maackia
    last month

    Bill, if that H. macrophylla survives two Wadena winters I’ll buy you Ellsworth, WI cheese curds. But no building of structures!

  • BillMN-z-2-3-4
    last month

    Nope, I plan on just leaving it to 'Luck of the Draw'.

    I understand the tops of these might die but they'll send out new shoots in spring that will flower?

    Does that count? :-)


  • BillMN-z-2-3-4
    last month

    Oh, the Bicolor oak (Quercus bicolor) from acorns procured at the Freedom tower NYC is doing well but like I said, it's been a 'Cinderella year' with heavy snow cover last winter. An additional 2.5" of rain last night means the drought is over here (for another 2 weeks anyways). ;-)


  • Vvall
    last month

    You all have such great gardens! This little guy, a Siberian crabapple, lost about 1/2 of his overall height this winter and I wasn't sure he'd make it, but look how happy he looks! We also started a hive this year. Wish us luck trying to over winter them up here in zone 1!

  • BillMN-z-2-3-4
    last month

    Great pictures!

    Nice start on the sunflowers, they're bigger than mine are. :-0

    Keep us updated on these projects they sound interesting. :-)

  • Vvall
    last month

    Yes, the sunflowers do so well up here! This spot gets sun pretty much all day. We're at just under 22 hours of sunlight right now, although we've already lost almost 5 minutes since solstice ὢ5.

  • ViburnumValley central KY Bluegrass z6
    last month

    Here's a comer: Lonicera sempervirens flower buds, slightly back-lit...



    And...a really long bloom (~ 21 inches/53 cm) that is still about 10 days from opening: Aesculus parviflora var. serotina seedling...



  • L Clark (zone 4 WY)
    last month

    Woah, that is a long flower

  • ViburnumValley central KY Bluegrass z6
    last month

    These bloom unabashedly, and they are handsome in fall color as well.




  • tsugajunkie z5 SE WI ♱
    last month

    Hard to get a good pic, but my serviceberry has a bumper crop this year. Even the birds, squirrels and chipmunks can’t keep up and there was enough for pie. Best pie you ever hung a lip on!


    tj

  • ViburnumValley central KY Bluegrass z6
    last month

    "Is everything a toy to you???"





  • arbordave (SE MI)
    last month

    I have a couple of the above (3rd year from seed), about 6' tall. Time to outplant or repot them. That's a Heptacodium in the background.


  • ViburnumValley central KY Bluegrass z6
    last month
    last modified: last month

    I have a big tree that was outplanted in 2003, about 30 feet (9 m) tall now. I didn't realize it, but it had set seed and I pulled the leaf above from a seedling that had germinated in the gravelly edge of my driveway - where I had presumed it was just another Celtis occidentalis that I'd whack when I got around to it.

    Now, I suppose I should move it and give it a better future.

    I also see that there are either seedlings or root sprouts in the vicinity of my lone Heptacodium. Maybe I'll have to move some of them around, too.

    Here are some diminutive details that will become showpieces as they are pollinated and become fruitful...







  • bengz6westmd
    last month

    Viburnum, I can't tell from above what you're showing there. Certainly unique flowers.

  • Palms And Pines
    last month
    last modified: last month

    This Bismarckia nobilis palm I planted from a seed 3 years ago, is finally getting palmate (fan) leaves.


  • arbordave (SE MI)
    last month

    VV's photos from yesterday look like Euonymus atropurpureus - a species that is scarce enough in Michigan to be of "special concern" - I've never seen it in my area. I'm still wondering about the ID of the viburnums in VV's photos from 7 days ago?

    Palms and Pines - I had to look up Bismarckia. Pretty cool looking palm. I'm assuming you're in south FL?

  • Palms And Pines
    last month

    Around southern central florida but pretty close to south florida, yeah bismarckia is quite nice when fully grown unfortunately a weevil has been killing alot of them around me so I hope they dont attack my little one.

  • ViburnumValley central KY Bluegrass z6
    last month

    Catching up...


    Yes, Euonymus atropurpureus is affectionately known as Eastern Wahoo 'round these parts. These are quite small flowers, and along with the darker purplish color, most would not observe them when they bloom. This plant's show comes later, when the "hearts a-burstin'" capsules are formed, split, and the orangish seeds hang down.




    This species can also represent quite nicely in the fall color department...



  • ViburnumValley central KY Bluegrass z6
    last month

    And to additionally respond @arbordave (SE MI):


    The first two images (heart shaped leaf and stem showing stipules) are Viburnum molle - Kentucky Viburnum.


    The next three are Viburnum rufidulum - Rusty Blackhaw Viburnum.


    See @maackia? It needs to come back to viburnums...

  • BillMN-z-2-3-4
    last month

    VV, your Euonymus atropurpureus just reminded me, my Physocarpus Opulifolius (Diabolo ninebark) had beautiful white flowers a few weeks ago and I had to do a double take when I looked last week and saw red (literally). :-)

    Early June:

    Late June:

    Pretty cool! :-)

  • BillMN-z-2-3-4
    last month

    First flowers on male Ilex verticillata. Seems slow and late but our growing season didn't start this year until almost June. The Female plants seem to be a few days behind the male with no open flowers yet only buds beginning to turn whitish in color.

    These were very small seedlings when planted last season, so I'm surprised to see any blooms. I was expecting maybe next year.