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Concrete over granite countertops? Or other alternatives

J T
14 days ago
last modified: 14 days ago

I have these eyesore orange and brown granite countertops. I'm looking for a cheap alternative (preferably not epoxy) to finish them and also square off the Ogee edging).

Any thoughts on a resurface for this? Was thinking concrete or Daich Spreadstone. Not sure what others have tried.

FYI - the cabinets are getting re-painted to a white. This will have to do until I am further down the road on this house and can afford a complete kitchen overhaul, so please don't recommend that ;)

Open to other ideas, though!


Comments (97)

  • J T
    Original Author
    14 days ago

    How about this? I hacked together the backsplash from that earlier link and "beiged" (yes you heard it here first) the cabinets.




  • SeattleMCM
    14 days ago

    I wouldn't. For the reasons I stated above.

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  • housegal200
    14 days ago
    last modified: 14 days ago

    @JT: re backsplash you showed. As Maureen said, if you're changing the backsplash, keep it simple. You don't put busy with busy but have a contrast of simple backsplash with busy countertop. GET SAMPLES to put against countertops, then cabinets, then floor. Simple backsplash tile has to harmonize with all three.

    I agree with the pros who've posted: No need to paint the cabinets at all because you said you were trying to save money and will do a big reno in the future. You'll get the lighter effect you want with a light, simple backsplash laid out in a grid--no complicated patterns--that works with your current cabinets and countertops.

    J T thanked housegal200
  • PRO
    Debbi Washburn
    14 days ago

    Not so sure about that. That top is still busy and if that tile doesn't have spot on colors - it will be a mess. The ones that Maureen posted are nice. Do that in a herringbone pattern if you want a little interest.

    Personally , I don't like the mock up you did above. It is too white floor to ceiling. It feels a little blah. That's just me though - I love a wood stained cabinet

  • J T
    Original Author
    14 days ago

    @Debbi Washburn Which mockup did Maureen do? I only see the kitchen pic she posted from her own kitchen. I unfortunately don't have her cabinet style or countertop style or color, so doesn't seem like if I did that mine would turn out quite as successful.

  • SeattleMCM
    14 days ago
    last modified: 14 days ago

    I agree with Beverly. I posted the white above because you seem so set on it, but I think a color would work so much better with just about everything.

    Something I didn't notice before is that your walls appear to be bright white. That's gonna complicate things if you must choose an off white (or light beige) for the cabinets. Just because the white cabinets look ok in the mockup, doesn't guarantee it will IRL. It could open up a can of worms, where you wind up painting your whole kitchen and nearby rooms.

    Choosing a color for the cabinets eliminates that issue. This warm grey ties everything together. (I think the sagey green did too.)


    The tile situation is tough. If the tiles are too white, they won't go with the counter. Too off-white may not go with your bright walls. IDK what to recommend, maybe somebody else will have a better idea. It doesn't have to be subway, but I strongly recommend against really small tiles or anything that has color variation to it, since the granite is so busy.


    J T thanked SeattleMCM
  • Jennifer K
    14 days ago

    Easiest thing to do with the greatest ROI would be to change out the backsplash for something plain. Just that and the counters will stop being overwhelming and start being the moderate level of textural interest they were meant to be.


    If you've just bought this house, then you (like every home buyer before you, me included) have a natural desire to put your own stamp on it. But, as you've said, there's a lot of more important things to spend money on than expensive, cosmetic changes to a functioning space. Save the favour from your painter for walls. It will be a better investment.

    J T thanked Jennifer K
  • housegal200
    13 days ago
    last modified: 13 days ago

    I'm signing off after this Comment, but what we haven't seen is a wider view of adjacent space from all four sides. We see the breakfast bar side with a different color flooring in the distance. (Why is kitchen floor gray?) But JT has given us no views of living, dining spaces that may or may not be in view of the kitchen. Good design, style, color should be holistic and take into account the view someone takes in when they walk into a space and experience it, look out at other spaces. We're all offering mock-ups or inspirational photos--guilty as charged--as if the kitchen is a walled-off space unconnected to the rest of the house. Not a great way to go about this. Good luck with whatever you decide, JT.

  • ci_lantro
    13 days ago

    The biggest ugly is the counters/ backsplash.

    I would replace those...all one level counter & switch from the double bowl sink to a single bowl.

    IMO, a single bowl sink and wider counter on the sink leg will upgrade the function so all of the spend is not just aesthetics.

  • PRO
    Debbi Washburn
    13 days ago

    I was referring to the tile Maureen had posted. The mock up I mentioned was the one you had posted.

    It would be so much easier if we could respond to specific comments!

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    13 days ago

    No concrete or epoxy over granite; you will be sorry.

  • Verbo
    13 days ago

    Some people just can’t be helped until they themselves do 60K worth of damage with 1K of poor work that ruins the whole. Then they start to understand its better to do NOTHING than vandalize their stuff with badly done craft projects and slapped on house paint. Dunning Kruger strikes again.

  • J T
    Original Author
    13 days ago

    Some people have budgets and have to get creative. Ideal? No. Sufficient? Yes. Creativity can be a good thing.

  • Jennifer K
    13 days ago

    We all have budgets. But Verbo, in his usual acerbic fashion, is correct. It's better to wait and do something of similar quality to what you have than to be "creative" and create a bigger problem than just the aesthetic issue you have now. You may not be rich in money. But you have lots of time.

  • J T
    Original Author
    13 days ago

    If I had the budget I wouldn’t be on Houzz asking people for creative advice. I’d be talking to a local kitchen remodeler. Defeats the purpose of my post.

  • socks
    13 days ago

    Changing the cabinet color as suggested by @palimpsest makes the counters much more tolerable.

  • mainenell
    13 days ago

    Changing the granite to laminate could be an affordable alternative to trying to adhere something to the granite that won’t hold up. Although painting the cabinets the color that palimpset suggested looks like it will work. Hopefully it will hold up well.

  • susan_lewis193
    12 days ago
    last modified: 12 days ago

    I love your kitchen. If the benchtops are real stone, keep them! Then, tile or paint splashback in plain satin or mat tiles in antique white or close to wall colour. plain textured too as there is enough going on. Paint top cupboards in same colour as wall. Then pick out a colour from the bench top and paint the base cupboards in that colour but NOT if yellow. You can get a sample and paint a pice of cardboard and lean it up against it for a few days to test in changing light. Consider leaving those carved ends in the natural wood (also consider Black Japan, which is really a dark chocolate for the whole of the wood base cupboards only). Good luck. Would love to see end result

  • SeattleMCM
    12 days ago
    last modified: 12 days ago

    If I had the budget I wouldn’t be on Houzz asking people for creative advice.

    Like I said in my first post, most people on Houzz are not into creative hacking. Like, at all. This is not really the forum for it. You might have better luck on reddit.

    I have done tons of DIY jobs for my homes. Like you, I'm willing to experiment, especially when I hate something. And often I think "good enough" looks way better than what was there before, especially if it's just meant for you, as a temporary placeholder. If you plan to rip it out one day, may as well have some fun with it now, right? But I've been doing it long enough to learn that some things simply can't be hacked well, or can't be done affordably (or both). I'm afraid that your counters -- particularly with the ogee edge -- fall in that category.

    But you said you have a good deal with a painter for your cabinets, so go for it! Like many of us here are saying, just that change and removing the backsplash might be just the thing to help you live with the rest of it for a few years until you can get to that reno. I didn't mean to try bully you into a color. White is going to be super tricky since the counter is warm, the walls are cool, and you have two different shades of white in the flooring around there. But If you want white cabinets, do it. It's your house! Have fun with it!

  • coray
    12 days ago

    J T: I totally get that! It would be great if we all had a tree 💵💰grew on, but they are hard to find. I have lived with an “orange kitchen” for 5 1/2 years in this house, so I feel your pain! We made a couple of inexpensive changes in the kitchen when we took it over from the previous owners (new DW and fridge, which we are keeping, a new island light, faucet etc), and some of these items will now be obsolete after the total remodel, but there were things I just couldn’t live with, so I’m ok with it. This upcoming remodel (just took upper cabs out so the new windows can go in soon) was going to be the most expensive interior project, so we waited and worked on smaller projects instead (3 total bathroom remodels, master closet, new knotty alder interior doors, so far not quite finished, LVP flooring downstairs, also partial as yet, et al)…..it takes time doing it this way. Do I wish we had done some things differently, or been able to change them up more completely? Sure…..but, as you said yourself, it might not be 100% ideal, but at least it’s much better than before. Unless one has a huge budget, it’s all about compromising….some things we have learned to live with and not fret about too much.
    For your situation I agree with what many have said: don’t spend too much now if you know you’re going to gut the kitchen later on. Get your cabs painted (since you are getting a good deal), remove the backsplash granite and repair and paint the wall with a good paint; if you really are going to remodel you’re just wasting money with a temporary tile….it’ll likely need to come out once you get new counter tops. With these changes you’ll be able to live with the current kitchen until you remodel it. Whether you go light (creamy white or beige or gray) or go with a deeper color is a matter of YOUR preference and taste; don’t be swayed to go dark because people are suggesting that IF you know that you’d prefer a lighter kitchen….you’ll only regret it. Good luck!

  • susan_lewis193
    12 days ago
    last modified: 12 days ago

    In the end fashions come and go including in houses. In our 'modern' world we can be quick to judge and want to do the new dream this or that. I love to see images from Europe and the UK of centuries old imperfect features that have been retained because they are quality and do the job, with other modern touches incorporated around them. As others have said, just have fun with it. It's a first world problem and a privilege.

  • bry911
    12 days ago
    last modified: 12 days ago

    If I had the budget I wouldn’t be on Houzz asking people for creative advice. I’d be talking to a local kitchen remodeler. Defeats the purpose of my post.

    Sometimes projects are just not feasible. In this case, I suspect that you are not properly weighting the risk against the reward of the outcome.

    I have been spraying paint almost as long as I have been woodworking and I will tell unequivocally, no one is going to properly prep those doors for paint for $1,000. I don't know anyone who would paint those doors, I certainly wouldn't, there is way too much detail. It would be significantly cheaper and way less risky to have those doors remade than it would be to prep them.

    I understand that you have seen his work, but do you really have the skills to understand how those jobs relate to yours? Your painter is likely going to hit the doors with a deglosser and hope it works. It might, but I doubt it. Deglosser is notoriously bad on glazed cabinets and it fails a lot more often than it works in that situation. That glaze in the deep groove is likely thick and it isn't coming off and it is going to compromise the coating you put on it.

    In all honesty, I would charge my wife $300 per door, I would tell everyone else to go pound sand.

    Good luck.

  • RedRyder
    12 days ago

    If the painter will remove the doors, sand, prep, sand, paint, sand and paint for that price, go for it. I like the lighter colors - they will brighten the room and make the dark brown feeling go away. Remove the backsplash, fix the wall and paint it. Then do your roof, save your money and do a full reno later.
    Look at soft whites or ivories. SW Antique is a nice ivory, and SW Creamy is also soft but can lean yellow in the wrong lighting.

  • palimpsest
    12 days ago
    last modified: 12 days ago

    In my last house I lived without a kitchen at all for 4-1/2 years. And part of that with a dorm refrigerator and microwave only, sitting in the LR. And in this house a bottom of the barrel melamine kitchen with bits of cardboard shoved into the gaps between cabinets which were then covered with caulk. And we lived with that for 8 years (and are redoing it now). We literally took a couple cabinets down along the way as they disintegrated. Whoever put this kitchen in took the old one out in one day and put the new one in in a day or two.

    But I wasn't going to spend one penny on a kitchen I was going to replace in a few years.

    That said, if you Know you are going to redo this kitchen, and you are willing to spend a couple thousand dollars on it for cosmetics . . . does it really matter if the paint job is excellent or not? How long does it have to last? Is there any chance that you would have to sell the house without doing the real remodel of the kitchen?

  • J T
    Original Author
    12 days ago

    There is a chance I would sell at some point before a complete remodel, which is why I’d consider doing a temporary update…

  • Jennifer K
    12 days ago

    If you're considering an update for the purposes of selling, then the last thing you want to do is cover up high-quality materials with DIY just because those materials aren't to your taste.


    So you have a choice: accept the almost unanimous advice from people who have a lot of experience with sort of thing and do very little with that kitchen until you can afford to do it properly; or potentially significantly devalue the resale value of (probably) your largest asset. Me, I'd find something less risky to spend my money on.

  • Circus Peanut
    12 days ago

    If you absolutely hate those stone counters, I'd probably just remove them entirely and sell them, and then use the cash for simple durable solid surface/formica until you do a full remodel.

  • RedRyder
    11 days ago

    When I was selling my house a couple of years ago, my realtor insisted we paint the kitchen white and add a new backsplash. I don’t know what the real estate market is in your area but many of them will tell you to paint the kitchen a light color, remove the backsplash and leave the countertop. If reselling is in the cards, you need a realtor’s advice in addition to the people here. If painting the kitchen will make YOU happier until you can do the big Reno, then paint it.

    Every market is different. Ask a selling pro for advice too,

  • palimpsest
    11 days ago

    If you were doing these updates for yourself, knowing that you would be renovating in x years, that is when I would say the durability may not be much of an issue.

    I would be more likely to buy a house with granite I did not like than buy a house with some sort of paint or treatment on the granite, because granite is at least durable and easy to clean.

    I can't say about the cabinets being painted. That would depend about the paint job and how long I was going to keep the kitchen myself.

    But I have seen a lot of bad paint jobs imo and I would pass on a house with a lot of badly painted millwork unless I was budgeting to fix or replace it.

  • J T
    Original Author
    11 days ago

    Its hard to devalue an already outdated kitchen at least by 20 years. Moreover, the cabinet painting isnt a hack job. Its done by a pro who I personally know. The “professionals” here are likely kitchen remodelers who always say the same thing bc they make money from it: “just redo the entire thing.” Again, as if everyone has deep pockets and can just toss around a bunch of cash with a wave of the hand.

    Whats the point of discussing these items if everyone’s reply is “just replace it.” Come up with something for the person asking the question instead of the same. Don’t you think there’s an underlying assumption here that I would’ve replaced the entire thing if the budget was there? As I stated earlier, I wouldn’t have come here if I had the budget.

    Maybe the next advice is “just buy a new house. Whats the point of remodeling?”

  • N Johnson
    11 days ago

    You asked for advice and you got advice FOR FREE. It’s up to you to sort out what works for you and what doesn’t and do what you want. There’s no sense in grumbling about your FREE GIFTS. You were lucky to have gotten comments from some of the most reliable contributors on this FREE ADVICE column. Are you going to blame them if you take their advice (or not) and things go wrong? They are looking at your photo with new eyes and you don’t like what they see or the FREE ADVICE they offer. Huh.

    Gratitude is a daily virtue I work to remember.

  • felizlady
    11 days ago

    I prefer a less chunky-veined lighter-toned granite…..concrete is too much like sidewalk, Corian is solid but boring. When we last did our Los Angeles kitchen (after a leaky pipe ruined the lower cabinetry, I selected white Shaker-style cabinetry. I asked my hubby if there was something he would like in the kitchen and he said “green”. I found a beautiful mid-green-veined-on mainly-white-background granite. It doesn’t feel as heavy as a solid stone counter or a concrete counter. I used the granite for the perimeter counters and butcher block for the island. The edges are simple…just lightly “eased” (softened, barely rounded, not sharp edges). The walls are painted a pale green, too. The kitchen has a skylight over the island, so it is a bright room during the day.

    J T thanked felizlady
  • J T
    Original Author
    11 days ago

    There have been some great suggestions here, and I'm thankful for all contributions; however, there are likely some professionals on here who don't like it when people DIY, because it's not helping their industry.

  • J T
    Original Author
    11 days ago

    Thanks @felizlady! I bet that looks awesome!

  • palimpsest
    11 days ago

    JT, actually I have seen threads where the OP was told not to even bother trying to remodel a kitchen and to sell the house. And no, that's not helpful.

    I feel like a lot of times in threads like this I don't give much helpful direct advice, and I feel like my advice in this one maybe has not been that consistent, because partly what I tried to do was sort out the context. And I still feel if you stay until you remodel the kitchen completely that 1) doing something weird to the existing granite would probably be a bad strategic move in terms of you having to live with it until then and 2) painting would be fine if you find the quality acceptable

    But if you Move before you do a full remodel most buyers would find altered granite a negative and the painted cabinets could go either way, a buyer may be fine with it or they may not. Either could force them into a remodel sooner rather than later,

    I don't like to get into discussions about whether something adds value or takes away value in this sort of situation. That really depends upon the buyer. When we sold my parents house, I assumed the first thing they would do was remodel the 45 year old kitchen, but on FB it looks like they put a new granite countertop in and kept the rest. So who knows.

    I am not sure that Houzz/GW is a representative of what most people would do, because the population here is more interested in kitchen and bath remodeling and decorating than most people.

    The most recent people I know who are doing kitchen remodeling are (1) like for like replacement of the existing kitchen cabinets (no changing of design) because the old kitchen was literally falling apart, and they are selling within a year or two. (2) relatively new owners of a house who are remodeling a 50 year old kitchen that is falling apart. Again mostly a like for like replacement.

    Neither of these families have an obsessive quest for the perfect layout, the perfect range hood and other appliances or any of the things that people obsess over for a year before even starting a remodel like the people who frequent these forums. I don't think you are going to get advice of what the typical person would do, or might expect if they are the next buyer of your house. But I still think the typical next buyer would balk at granite counters with something weird done to them. So if you think it is likely that you Will get to remodel full go ahead and try whatever, but if you think it is likely you will end up selling first I would still suggest leaving them alone and trying to work with them.

    J T thanked palimpsest
  • Maria M.
    11 days ago

    I love the darker cabinet color picked by Beverly. I think you should try that and see if maybe the countertop grows on you a little bit.

    J T thanked Maria M.
  • J T
    Original Author
    11 days ago

    @palimpsest Thanks for the advice! I think I'm going to put up some paper or paint some cardboard white or something similar and put it up over the backsplash for a few days and see how it works. I may also do something similar with the cabinets and then make a decision going forward. After seeing some posts here, probably not great to touch the granite....I do, however, believe that a replaced backsplash and possibly painted cabinets (again, professionally) could make the kitchen a place that doesn't absorb all light around it, and then I can move on to other items in the house (that will be done by pros).

  • coray
    11 days ago

    J T: I know what you’re saying (re pros possibly trying to convince people to completely remodel because that benefits their industry), but I’m not sure I agree. I have seen many pros on Houzz give endless advice to people, weighing in again and again, often for people who can’t seem to make a decision on the simple purchase of a vase, a picture or the like….some are very patient. I think the bigger issue is that when you pose a design question to such a huge community, you’re bound to get tons of very different answers/advice, often opposing what the previous person said….it’s the nature of the beast. I do agree with one thing you said: often people ask specific questions re a few specific elements (as you did), and you’ll receive advice such as “oh, don’t do any of THAT, what you REALLY NEED is all new appliances, lighting, furnishings etc”, which doesn’t really help much. I think in your case the overwhelming consensus was to remove the granite backsplash and keep the tops, unaltered…..I’d say that is good advice to heed. The rest (cabinet paint colors etc) is up to you.

    J T thanked coray
  • bry911
    11 days ago

    "there are likely some professionals on here who don't like it when people DIY, because it's not helping their industry."


    First, you are not DIYing this. You are paying a professional $1,000.

    There is certainly an anti-DIY bias on this site, but I don't think that is because of any loyalty to the industry. I strongly suspect it is because there are so many sources pretending that if you have $200 and a free weekend, you can do a kitchen makeover. You can't, if you had a raw look at the hundreds of hours that bloggers, magazines, and television shows put into a "weekend project" you would be amazed. I do think people get defensive when you pretend you can master the skill the have spent thousands of hours and thousands of dollars mastering with $200 and a weekend.


    I am not a pro. I have pretty extensive education and experience with coatings. I spray paint as a very expensive hobby. I often give tips for DIY paint jobs on this site and firmly believe that people can get production results if they are willing to take the time necessary.


    However, unless you are sleeping with the painter, you are not getting a decent prep job on these cabinets for $1,000. Even then, the painter is a fool, but people in love do foolish things.

    ---

    The reality is these things are always a little risky. I have had coatings that really should have failed last years and I have coatings that should have lasted decades fail in a few years. I try not to set myself up for heartache by using the spray and pray method. Your painter is going to scuff up the existing coating as best he can, the spray and hope that whatever he sprays doesn't have adhesion issues.

    J T thanked bry911
  • PRO
    Debbi Washburn
    11 days ago

    Most of us are not trying to be negative to your DIY but we have lived it. Clients who have cabinets painted only to have to repaint them every few years; ones who do a partial remodel to what seems popular today only to have be incredibly out of fashion when they go to see; ones who go to the expense of changing counter and backsplashes and then throw that all away when they finally remodel the kitchen and change the layout. We are just trying to point out what we have experienced.

    My honest opinion - if you really want to paint the cabinet AND the talent is there, then go ahead. I would also remove the backsplash and do a nice tile.

    Good luck!

  • bry911
    11 days ago

    Just for clarification. I would feel better about your project were you DIYing the paint job with a $1,000 budget. That seems like a reasonable budget for a DIY cabinet painting job. However, that only works because you are not adding in your labor.


    There is another option that will be more than $1,000 but increase the chances for success exponentially, incidentally, even if you were DIYing that kitchen I would advise this... get new doors. Good, paint-ready shaker doors run between $45 - $60 each and something with more detail will be $60 - $75 each. It will be such a massive time savings that it is really the only way to go for those doors.

  • Caroline Hamilton
    11 days ago

    Completely honest opinion here and I haven't read all the other responses. Your kitchen is not that bad.... I fear if you paint the cabinets white it will look off. White cabinets will just look like a remuddle and clash with the counters. I would just live with it and wait until you can remodel. It looks like a poor layout. Can you actually stand at your sink and have the dishwasher open? It doesn't appear there is enough room.

  • palimpsest
    11 days ago

    It's interesting that you are experiencing some pro bias in this case (the don't bother to DIY etc.) because typically there is a Lot of Anti Pro bias as in "post your kitchen plans here, you will get a Much Better design than some disinterested KD will give you" and "Interior designers are a ripoff and you will end up with impersonal rooms that do not reflect you" or "You don't need an architect". I've seen a lot of that over the years too.

    J T thanked palimpsest
  • RedRyder
    11 days ago

    I have refaced two kitchens and worked in that industry. Changing your doors will be expensive. You will be bordering on spending almost as much as a remodel without changing the layout.

    As for the free advice, you have a HUGE audience and there will be some ideas that seem “off”. Ignore them. If someone wants to paint a house and asks for color help, inevitably a pro will tell them to change out their windows. A professional can’t “unsee” design errors and I think even the out-there responses have some basis in logic to the pro.

    I know I’m prejudiced about painting things that are annoying, even if a full remodel is in the future. So that’s what I recommended. Having a variety of ideas, even if it seems like the responder didn’t really “read” your question is just food for thought.

    Remember that most people who offer ideas would like to know what you’re going to do and, at the least, see the end result with photos. And many of us enjoy watching the progress if you remember - mid-job -to post for us.

    J T thanked RedRyder
  • bry911
    11 days ago
    last modified: 11 days ago

    I have refaced two kitchens and worked in that industry. Changing your doors will be expensive. You will be bordering on spending almost as much as a remodel without changing the layout.

    I don't want to get into a big debate, but this is simply and objectively false. I also question the relevance of your industry experience given your support for the $1,000 professional paint job.

    An 18" x 30" paint grade Alder frame with MDF panel and a standard hinge bore is $52.45 from Barkerdoor and they are not particularly cheap. You can find the same doors in a Google search with boring for $45. So there is no need to speculate on door prices being too expensive, there are dozens of door suppliers online with automatic quoting tools. The OP can take a few measurements and figure out their price. The standard price is $15 per square foot plus $7.50 for hinge boring.

    ETA: Given the picture, I suspect the OP has 8 full size doors, and 5 or 6 drawer fronts. The price will be a bit less than $800 for shaker doors and drawer fronts. Which the painter can then paint without having to deal with prepping.

  • palimpsest
    11 days ago

    I think RedRyder is talking about professional refacing where the exposed parts of the boxes and such get faced in matching material to the doors, which is a process which can be as expensive as new cabinets, the advantage being that there is no demolition. She is not talking about the homeowner ordering new doors online.

  • bry911
    11 days ago

    "I think RedRyder is talking about professional refacing [...]. She is not talking about the homeowner ordering new doors online."


    The post says, "Changing your doors will be expensive. You will be bordering on spending almost as much as a remodel without changing the layout."


    The refacing industry largely prices at the cost of substitutable products. Doors and veneers are fairly cheap. It is expensive to order a veneer and a door that are finished and match each other. As the OP has a painter, this doesn't apply to the OP.

  • housegal200
    11 days ago

    Get a few pieces of thin plywood cut to the size of a long section of your backsplash. Mortar plain subway tiles onto the plywood in a pale shade pulled from the lightest background color from the granite. See how it looks in daylight and under kitchen and undercounter lights and how well the tiles harmonize with all your elements--wood cabinets and floor.

  • dcarendt
    11 days ago

    FWIW - similar color cabinets, busy granite cleaned up with ivory subway tile and BM Lace Handkerchief wall color to tone down the cabinets.