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lclark21324

Pyres Ussuriensis Mountain Frost

L Clark (zone 4 WY)
8 days ago
last modified: 8 days ago

Anyone grow this tree or have experience with it?

Comments (11)

  • L Clark (zone 4 WY)
    Original Author
    8 days ago

    @mntreegrower. If anyone has experience with this tree on here it's you!

  • davidrt28 (zone 7)
    7 days ago

    This species just seems like a more northerly, parapatric variant of Pyrus calleryana. What's to keep it from also becoming invasive?


  • gardengal48 (PNW Z8/9)
    7 days ago

    ^^^ Aside from the fact that it has been grown in this country since the turn of the 20th century and with no indication of invasive tendencies? That and the fact that it flowers earlier than any other popular pear species and so is prone to frost damage that would prevent any fruiting, especially in colder/more northerly locations. And it also needs a compatible pollinator.

  • davidrt28 (zone 7)
    6 days ago
    last modified: 6 days ago

    Fair enough, but has it been grown in places where those tendencies could be demonstrated?

    According to this website it's not grown in many gardens along the eastern seaboard.

    https://websites.rbge.org.uk/multisite/multisite3.php

    Longwood has a plant, but only starting in 2007.

    Prunus mume and hazelnuts are 'fruiting' / 'nutting' (LOL) most years here, so I would speculate it would have no trouble producing viable seed here.

    But it sounds like a valuable ornamental for zone 4 where it's unlikely to become a problem.

  • maackia
    6 days ago

    "Prunus mume and hazelnuts are 'fruiting' / 'nutting' (LOL) most years here, so I would speculate it would have no trouble producing viable seed here."


    I have to admit, I don't understand the logic of how this pertains to P. u. (?) invasiveness potential.


    This tree never seemed to catch on in the upper midwest. I don't have numbers, but I rarely see it offered at retail nurseries. There are a couple of clones, which I think Bailey Nurseries and NDSU developed, but neither seems to be especially popular. I did see a nice seedling specimen at Morton Arb and started to seek it out. It was never available where I was looking, which was pretty much all over western WI and eastern MN.

  • L Clark (zone 4 WY)
    Original Author
    6 days ago

    I planted a 'Ure' an a 'Golden Spice' last summer which are obviously fruit trees, but I loved their their ornamental qualities most (great fall color and leaf texture). A pyrus ussuriensis selected specifically for ornamental qualities has got to be a really nice tree

  • davidrt28 (zone 7)
    6 days ago

    I have to admit, I don't understand the logic of how this pertains to P. u. (?) invasiveness potential.


    Because they are early blooming too, probably earlier than this species.


  • mntreegrower
    20 hours ago

    "somebody mention you in a question" - If houzz hadn't sent me an email, I might not have noticed this until late spring.


    Why, I certainly have tried Mountain Frost! You have guessed correctly. It's a rather nice tree for sure, but as maackia said, it just has never caught on in the upper Midwest. That's the main reason I only planted a few smaller trial crops of it. I couldn't sell all of them. It's probably been over 5 years since I had one in my fields. If I remember right, fall color was quite nice, never saw any fruit (but the trees may not have been old enough yet), and never witnessed much of any leaf or twig blight. Growth rate here was similar to many crabapple cultivars. They did, however, seem more susceptible to developing trunk cankers than your standard ornamental tree. I don't know if that was a result of Minnesota's often extreme spring and fall temperature swings or not. Your climate is different in its own ways so hard to predict how this tree would perform for you.


    Does anyone sell it in your state? A major retailer here in the Twin Cities appears to still offer them in pots on their website and Bailey's still has them in their catalog for lining out as bare root.

  • maackia
    20 hours ago

    MNTG, thanks for sharing your experience with this tree. Do you think its failure to catch on with the consumer was a concern over invasve potential? I’m guessing no, but you would know better than I.

  • mntreegrower
    19 hours ago

    I would say no to any real invasive concerns. I think it's just more of a case of people not being familiar with it. Simply, they're not native and there are so many other ornamentals people can plant instead. Plus, fruit equals terrible mess for a lot of people. It's already like pulling teeth to get many customers to consider planting a Starlite crabapple (fruit the size of a large pea) over a Spring Snow - which has to be the worst crabapple for leaf fungus on the market right now. But hey! No berries!


    Oops, better stop myself before I go on a "Spring Snow is a garbage cultivar" rant. :D