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jlynn1187

Kitchen island has stove top with no hood…dealbreaker?

jlynn1187
last month
last modified: last month

Hello! After years of searching, we think we finally found our dream home… except its at the TOP of our price range so we are hoping to avoid a bunch of renovations if they’re not necessary. The home is beautiful - brick, 3 car garage, 5 bedroom, 4 bath, remodeled kitchen, mud room, first floor office (I work from home), basement media room, covered deck, patio, large in ground pool and lots of yard space for the kids.

One thing that I’m questioning is the placement of the stove top on the center island and no hood over top. I’m concerned it could get pretty smoky when cooking. My dream kitchen would be bright and white, with stainless steel appliances and a textured backsplash, and a large hood over the stove - preferably against a wall, not on the island. I actually don’t mind the dark cabinets in this particular kitchen though since the lighter countertops and island cabinets balance it a bit.

I also worry about the kids touching it more easily due to its location. We are so used to having a big island that we use as a catch-all for all kinds of things so it’ll be an adjustment to not have that.

What do you think? Would this be a dealbreaker? Here’s a couple pics for context… We‘d need to make an offer tomorrow if we are going to. Thanks!!





Comments (113)

  • MizLizzie
    last month
    last modified: last month

    The OP moved on days ago, and the offer date has long passed. So for her purposes, what the rest of us think has become moot. Check out palimpsest’s thread on TINY ISLAND COOKTOP. That one is beyond words.

  • jlynn1187
    Original Author
    last month

    @MizLizzie they extended the offer deadline to this afternoon

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  • MizLizzie
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Oh, good. What are you thinking?

    I still find the kitchen perfectly fuctional for the way I cook, but under no circumstances could i keep the gas cooktop. That is the only change I personally would need.

  • lyfia
    last month
    last modified: last month

    I personally don't like islands with a cooktop in it, but the kitchen itself looks efficient for working in. The downdraft with gas as has been mentioned is not ideal, but not a deal breaker either. Switching it to induction as mentioned would be a nice upgrade and if the house has a basement or crawl space probably not a big deal at all. In my area less than $500 for the electric if not already there. It would really only be a couple of hours of work for the electric, but depending on what is needed to pull it there it could vary so 500 dollars is a high estimate in my area. Then the cost of the cooktop which you can get a good one for around $700. Not a deal breaker even if it was at the top of my price range.

    I tend to put stuff into the dishwasher as I go when I cook so having the dishwasher near is nice. There appears to be enough landing space next to the cooktop. Not a huge amount, but adequate. You can put down cooking utensils and you can fit a bowl or cutting board with chopped stuff to add later. I have less than that on each side now and it works, although I have a wall on one side and a corner with more space that I never use on the other due to it being a corner. The only conflict with the dishwasher is that someone else would want to put something in there while cooking. It doesn't look like it is across from the cooktop directly so shouldn't interfere, but that is the one case where I see someone would get in the cooking area outside of the cook themselves.

  • PRO
    The Kitchen Place
    last month

    I would be happy and not offended at all if everyone here tore a potential house I wanted to buy to bits. I would WANT to hear it all...even if I don't agree with it. Something might spark a realization that I had never thought of. So let everyone give their honest opinions. You don't have to like it or agree with it...but it might make you THINK.


    For instance, I love old homes....will NEVER ever own a post-war home. Nothing personal. I grew up in a 70s tri-level....I just love all things old. People would probably trash my 1925 house and my design decisions....but I love it. I wouldn't be offended. Everyone's different. Once knew a guy that would only live in BRAND new homes because he was afraid of ghosts. LOL

  • H202
    last month

    This thread is ridiculous and this forum is getting to be ridiculous. There are about 5 or so posters (some of whom just started posted a few weeks ago) who seem to have some kind of inferiority complex, because for every question posted, they find a million things wrong. I assume they are either pros, trying to justify their own worth ("the pleebs can't possibly design as good a kitchen as a pro!") or individuals who redid their own kitchens 3 years ago and treated it like a literal full time job from which they now derive all their worth, so by definition, every kitchen is a disaster relative to their beacon of perfection.


    Listen, my husband and I are both huge cooks and spend three meals a day in the kitchen. We've lived in something like 15 different homes over the last 20 years (thanks to a bunch of moves that we thought would be the last one - so we get a temp place, renovated a home, then had to move again). Lots of rentals with horrible, crappy kitchens that violate 300 rules on this forum. You know what we've figured out? We were as happy with the crappy 1970s galley kitchen with electric stovetop, bad layout and no storage as we were in the $100k perfectly-designed reno. IT'S JUST A KITCHEN! You can still cook in it, you might just have to take three additional steps to walk to the dishwasher. The difference between the crappy kitchens and the well-designed ones were pretty meaningless to our day to day living. I follow this site because I like to follow design trends, and we're always ramping up to do some new reno - so i think it's fun to read and contribute. But this place is filling up with a bunch of crotchety unhelpful trolls (but sadly, I don't think they're trying to be trolls).


    This kitchen is fine. It's safe. It's perfectly well designed. Maybe there are things you'll realize aren't perfect when you get there, but it's not going to impact your life beyond a 3 second thought here and there. So maybe you do a little less meat and fish searing, to avoid the really smoky kitchen, and you start roasting them instead (healthier!). How much smoke does a cooktop really produce otherwise? And yes, the island is small. But I cook all the time, and my cooktop stuff doesn't need much space. I'm not making 54-ingredient soups. Most of the stuff on my cooktop is: Boiling pasta, frying a couple onions or celery and adding a veggie, steaming a veggie, frying a couple eggs. All of those things can be handled on a small island with zero sacrifice. And so what if you do make a big soup or host big dinners. Heaven forbid you chop your onion 3 steps away on the main counter and walk it over!?! Point is, the above hand wringing is ridiculous, the kitchen is good, the house is perfect.... go for it!

  • jlynn1187
    Original Author
    last month

    @MizLizzie thank you! we put in an offer! 🤞


    heres the full listing if you’re interested in taking a look: https://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1437-W-Stoker-Ct_Loveland_OH_45140_M46934-34563

  • mxk3 z5b_MI
    last month

    Nice house - hope you get it! DH would be all over the fact there are both basement and upstairs bars (priorities - LOL!), and I'd be all over that covered patio, pool, and walk-out office.


  • Toronto Veterinarian
    last month

    If I was looking for a house that large, that kitchen would not bother me in the least. I kind of like it (though I would prefer an induction stove over gas). Does it come with the aquarium? I think it's wonderful.

  • jlynn1187
    Original Author
    last month

    @mxk3 z5b_MI thank you! yep, my husband is a bourbon collector so he LOVES the multiple bar areas 😂


    @Toronto Veterinarian it does come with the aquarium and the fish! 🐠

  • Ig222
    last month

    I just looked at the listing. It looks like a beautiful house.


    Good luck.

  • PRO
    The Kitchen Place
    last month

    jlynn....wow, love that basement bar and backyard the most about the house. I hope you get it! Very cool house.

  • Chessie
    last month

    Oh my I LOVE THAT TREE out front!!! I am a bit of a tree nerd LOL! Beautiful home, and I love the backyard - so nice! Love the aquarium too! I can see why you want the house. In the grand scheme of things, the little issues in the kitchen are very minor! I hope you get it and enjoy your lovely new home!

  • jlynn1187
    Original Author
    last month

    @Ig222 @The Kitchen Place @Chessie thanks so much! the backyard is definitely my favorite part and the one thing I did not want to compromise on! the listing agent told our agent the sellers want 48 hours to review all offers (so by sunday) but shes trying to push them to decide sooner 🤞

  • PRO
    The Kitchen Place
    last month

    I just noticed where you live! I'm not far from you. I live in Oakwood, OH (Dayton) and my business is in Xenia, OH. I love Loveland...it's such a beautiful, historic little town!

  • jlynn1187
    Original Author
    last month

    @The Kitchen Place wow, you are super close! yes, we moved here 8 years ago (I grew up in Cincinnati) after we got married and fell in love with the area!

  • jlynn1187
    Original Author
    last month

    Update: WE GOT THE HOUSE!!!!!!!!

  • mxk3 z5b_MI
    last month

    Yay!!!!

  • Kompy
    last month

    Yay!!!

  • opaone
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Congrats on the new house!

    Kind of late to this thread but... 10 or 15 years ago I wouldn't have had a huge problem w/ the lack of an overhead hood and might have agreed with the 'replace it with induction'. We've learned a lot over the past few years about the health affects of cooking without proper ventilation and we'll learn a lot more in the coming years so my views have changed considerably.

    Cooking itself, gas, electric coil or induction, can produce signficant amounts of quite harmful VOC's, Carcinogens and PM that if not effectively exhuasted will slowly degrade the health of those exposed to it.

    A downdraft of any sort is not effective nor is any type of recirculating.

    If your cooking is nothing more than boiling water then an induction is a good option. Otherwise you really need to look at installing a proper exhaust hood.

    More: https://bamasotan.us/range-exhaust-hood-faq/

  • Amy10N
    last month

    Congrats, how exciting!

  • bry911
    last month
    last modified: last month

    @opaone says, "Cooking itself, gas, electric coil or induction, can produce signficant amounts of quite harmful VOC's, Carcinogens and PM that if not effectively exhuasted will slowly degrade the health of those exposed to it."

    This is just an exaggeration and, IMO, a bit ridiculous... in reality home cooking produces rather insignificant levels of VOC's and an even a less significant amount of carcinogens. Furthermore, there is no way to produce airborne carcinogens without producing even more food borne carcinogens. Eating a single charred steak will have more carcinogens than charring dozens of steaks. If you eat meat that changes color as it cooks or breads that come out darker than they were before you started baking you have an increased chance of stomach and colorectal cancers.

    Carcinogen is a money word. Say it in the right places and people will just absolutely throw money at it. Sites like the one linked above are simply exploiting that for their own interest...it is the modern day vacuum salesman pulling up a little dirt from your carpet and pretending that it is the most disgusting thing ever.

    Cooking, especially charring, creates VOC's and can/will produce carcinogens... so does farting. Your body is constantly emitting VOC's through breathing, sweating, sneezing, etc. You are a mobile VOC producing machine. As are many other things in our life.

    I support making your home as healthy as you can and so please be concerned about how you cook foods, however, take a step back and look at the entire picture of your home and make rational informed decisions.

    Perspective matters...

  • sprtphntc7a
    last month

    Congrats!! Many Happy Years!!

  • Shannon_WI
    last month
    last modified: last month

    @bry911 - thank you for such a great post! I have never liked the alarmist posts that pop up here from a couple posters about how gas cooking will kill you.

    ETA: I am a big proponent of proper ventilation, but the OP is buying a house that otherwise fits her and her family's needs, and for some people here to be so doom and gloom over the kitchen is over the top. The reason why this forum exists is because people want to renovate their kitchens for goodness sakes, so to advise to take a pass on the house because the kitchen will eventually need renovation makes no sense for people who like to comment on this Kitchens Forum.

  • opaone
    last month
    last modified: last month

    "This is just an exaggeration and, IMO, a bit ridiculous... in reality home cooking produces rather insignificant levels of VOC's and an even a less significant amount of carcinogens."

    That may be your opinion but your opinion differs from what researchers at Mayo, Lawrence Berkeley National Labs, NYU Med and others are learning.

    .

    "Furthermore, there is no way to produce airborne carcinogens without producing even more food borne carcinogens. Eating a single charred steak will have more carcinogens than charring dozens of steaks."

    Yes, sort of, but two very different things. The carcinogens from eating a steak typicallly result in colorectal cancer. Airborne carcinogens result in lung and bladder cancer. The amount of carcinogenic exposure needed to develop cancer is very different for these and much lower for airborne. As well, some/much of the carcinogens from eating a steak are expelled quickly after eating while those you breathe appear to result in a much higher bit remaining in your body.

    IIRC, the effects are much greater in people who smoke. So while someone who doesn't smoke may have a 5% greater liklihood of developing cancer, someone who smokes will have a 30% greater liklihood for the same exposure (on top of the direct risk from smoking). There definately appears to be a compounding effect. And similarly, exposure appears somewhat logrithmic so 2µg may have 3x the effect of 1µg though there is still a lot of study needed on this.

    There have been some indications that babies born to women who stir-fry frequently at home are underweight and have lower cognitive function. Researchers aren't surprised by this and largely understand how it happens but how great the effect is needs more study.

    .

    After some years of writing about health topics in the U.S., EU and elsewhere I've a bit of a sense for which tips of icebergs will be ice cubes and which will be ice bergs. Similar to asbestos exposure, this all feels much more like a berg that will grow the more we learn.

    Your health, your choice.

  • bry911
    last month
    last modified: last month

    "That may be your opinion but your opinion differs from what researchers at Mayo, Lawrence Berkeley National Labs, NYU Med and others are learning."

    This is simply not true and really it is an inaccurate comparison, you are comparing my opinion to research findings rather than to the researcher's opinion on their findings. What studies have found is evidence of a mutative effect in laboratory conditions and in animal testing where we forced bioactivation, but we haven't found the extent to which humans bioactivate the inhaled carcinogens. In fact, studies are split relatively evenly on whether or not the aerosolized carcinogens are actually bioactivated and even then their cumulative effect is incredibly small. There are some studies that have found pretty small Odds Ratios for people who spend at least 10 years of high-heat deep frying.


    This is a problem with giving people access to research without the tools to properly analyze the research or the perspective to put that research in the broader scheme. It isn't what researchers find, it is how knowledgeable people in the field process and internalize that research.

    If you were to read my research you might be tempted to stick your money in a mattress and start Doomsday prepping, I don't and neither does anyone with proper perspective, but somewhere out there, someone has likely applied my findings to validate a rather bad decision.

  • mxk3 z5b_MI
    last month

    You guys -- her renovation isn't going to be anytime soon, stop cr*pping on her rainbow and let her revel in the joy of getting the house.

  • Mrs Pete
    last month
    last modified: last month

    If it suits her, who cares if it's inefficient for you or doesn't suit some "rules" of kitchens. She's the one living in it, and you know nothing about her life or family. There's no great burn or grease hazard with the stove in the middle of the kitchen - that's not an island with seating, and adults know to not stand next to flying grease.

    What I'd be concerned about is grease on the floor around the cooktop. I know that when I cook something like hamburgers, sometimes some grease flies out onto the floor in front of the range -- enough to make the floor slick enough to require immediate cleaning. When I cook something like hamburgers, I try to remember to lay a layer of newspaper on the floor so I can just throw it away /avoid the need to clean the floor afterward. And certainly the backsplash sometimes is hit with grease or steam. This cooktop will require some new habits.

    The OP says that in her old house the island became a clutter spot /things piled up ... I don't see this island taking on that same habit. The location seems to discourage that. Also, when moving into a new house, the OP has an opportunity to set up a drop-spot for mail, etc. and to build good habits right away.

    Last thought on the cooktop: my brother's house has no range hood at all. He says it's not all that big a deal; when he cooks certain things, he turns on an oscillating fan that he keeps on a side counter. Also, his kitchen is huge, like the one the OP is showing us.

    Personally, I'm glad all the "do what you want and it will all be sunshine and roses" people weren't around when I was doing my Kitchen...I wanted to have people analyze and be honest, not just say something to make me feel good (at least until I had to live with the issues that were glossed over).

    Agree.

    I'm not crazy about this kitchen, but it seems to be in an otherwise nice house. It's also not my business. What I can do is give an objective opinion on this or that detail.

    c'mon really, the microwave being inconvenient would be a thing to make you as you put it "seriously miserable"?

    First thought: We have different opinions of "miserable" because we use our microwaves differently. I rarely use mine for anything except warming a plate of leftovers for lunch. I'd be happy to have mine in a pantry or something.

    Second thought: On the internet in general, if you ignore the adjectives, you're likely to get closer to the truth.

    someone who smokes will have a 30% greater liklihood for the same exposure (on top of the direct risk from smoking).

    In my limited experience, I've found that people who smoke aren't overly concerned with their health.

  • Chessie
    last month

    CONGRATULATIONS!!!

  • opaone
    last month
    last modified: last month

    @bry911, congrats on the chem degree. That was my second to least favorite subject. Biology was my least favorite - which is why my wife and friends from those days think its funny that I ended up writing about medical/health stuff. I've a great deal of respect for anyone who makes it through 5 years of chem or biology!

    I'm not sure where you're getting the 60/40 split. All of the research I've seen shows mutations and enough to cause serious concern and warrant further research. As I said twice above, more study is needed, but lab and community studies are both strongly pointing to very significant risks from household/consumer airborne. I believe NYU has been doing some great work on this if you have access to their papers behind the paywalls.

    If you read the FAQ I posted I addressed this issue several times including a short bit specifically on dosing and exposure.

    To your earlier post that I originally replied to... If you'd said that there was a longshot chance that effluent from cooking would prove to be a not major issue I'd have agreed with you.

  • Buzz Solo in northeast MI
    last month

    Congratulations on getting the house you want!


  • bry911
    last month
    last modified: last month

    I'm not sure where you're getting the 60/40 split. All of the research I've seen shows mutations and enough to cause serious concern and warrant further research. As I said twice above, more study is needed, but lab and community studies are both strongly pointing to very significant risks from household/consumer airborne.

    "Further research" is a term that everyone who publishes research is required to put in published papers. It is quite literally saying we don't have enough information to reach a conclusion on this matter, but invite other people to research it. It is a guidepost for future grants and that is really all.

    Next, I haven't seen any study that says there is "very significant risks" and I am dubious that any peer reviewed journal would allow that. I have seen several studies that purport statistically significant findings at a 95% confidence interval, but that is a world away from "very significant risks."

    The research I have read, is showing statistically significant OR's in the 1.2 to 2.5 range for ten years of daily exposure to heavy frying. While they have presented their findings as statistically significant, they haven't presented it as a significant cause of lung cancer. For perspective, if your cabinets were painted with conversion varnish (still the most popular coating for kitchen cabinet manufacturers), they will have OR's in the 1.6 to 2.5 range and you don't have to cook anything at all for that exposure. Several organic solvents and cleaners have OR's in that same range.

    I get the 60/40 split because many of the studies are not finding OR's above 1. In fact, most of the research is coming out of China, because Chinese homes usually have no ventilation and they cook with hot oil which is often reused.

    We might also want to note that there is very tentative evidence (I probably shouldn't even mention it because it is mostly tangential) that downdraft hoods are preferred for this, as the studies haven't found an OR above 1 for others in the home even when there is years of heavy cooking in small homes with no kitchen ventilation. So apparently, only the person who is immediately inhaling fumes as they cook has this slightly elevated risk.

    ----

    Again, it isn't about whether something can hurt you or not, it is about not letting misunderstanding and fear distort that risk. The OP has now gotten a house that they love and this is something that they may one day want to address, but there are likely other coatings and textiles in their house that they may also want to address. Or they maybe they should start cooking better, or cooking better things, but they shouldn't be focused on any single concern out of context of all other concerns.

    ETA: Just for a bit more perspective, the incidence rate of lung cancer for non-smokers is between 6 to 8 per 10,000 people. Using the higher, these studies are similar to finding that 4.1 of the people who got cancer fried foods regularly while 3.9 didn’t but still got cancer.

    A researcher would be over the moon about those numbers, because if your research is about the causes of cancer among non-smokers these are incredible results, but using the perspective of all people it is a pretty low number.

    So saying that it, "will slowly degrade the health of those exposed to it," is not accurate at all. The vast majority of people will not have any adverse effects.

  • Alicia
    last month
    last modified: last month

    I am so confused by some of these comments! ”nothing that 100k cant fix”, ”deal breaker”. what market are these people in!? its a crazy sellers marketEr. no house is perfect, even if you custom build it. the kitchen is large, the island is in the middle, the kids will throw their stuff on the pennisula, not the island. yea yea, i wouldn't design a kitchen from scatch like that. but its nice enough, and if you love the house. ive had a kitchen without a hood and it wasnt awful. down the road you could put a range against the wall and get rid of the island maybe, that would not cost a 100,000, that is insane.

  • opaone
    last month

    @bry911, let's take the technical discussion to the FAQ (https://www.houzz.com/discussions/6099827/exhaust-hood-faq-ii) rather than glob up this post. Also, please post links to papers and excerpts of critical bits. I will do the same but as I have many other prirorities it may be a few days before I respond in any detail.


  • opaone
    last month

    "So saying that it, "will slowly degrade the health of those exposed to it," is not accurate at all. The vast majority of people will not have any adverse effects."

    You don't know that. And your saying that causes me to question your claim to be any sort of chemist or researcher.

    For perspective, the most conservative person I know doing this research is Brett Singer @ LBNL. Brett takes a very 'don't-dare-risk-overeacting' approach on the harmful health effects of cooking effluent and he now strongly recommends exhausting hoods for all residential cooking. He would say that the OP should very definately install an exhausting hood (vs recirculating, downdraft, etc.) in that kitchen before cooking in it. The potential health risks are simply too great not to, especially if there are children in the house.

    .

    "Again, it isn't about whether something can hurt you or not, it is about not letting misunderstanding and fear distort that risk. The OP has now gotten a house that they love and this is something that they may one day want to address, but there are likely other coatings and textiles in their house that they may also want to address. Or they maybe they should start cooking better, or cooking better things, but they shouldn't be focused on any single concern out of context of all other concerns."

    Yes. Absolutely. But your approach seems more along the lines of 'if you're not going to address the other IAQ issues then don't worry about addressing the cooking one'.

    All houses should have good general ventilation and in many or most cases (where windows can't be kept open much of the time) this will require mechanical ventilation in the form of an HRV/ERV or similar. Exhausting CO2, VOC's Carcinogens, and PM is critical to IAQ and occupant health.

    In many and possibly most homes the number one source of extraneous bad stuff in the air is from cooking. And, it is far best to eliminate this gook at the source than to let it spread out. A good proper exhausting range hood provides this critical benefit as well as providing some bit of general whole house ventilation.

    .



  • suedonim75
    last month

    ^^^Or maybe just let it go.

  • Mary Elizabeth
    last month

    @opaone "97% of scientists agree with whoever is funding them."

  • Toronto Veterinarian
    last month

    ""97% of scientists agree with whoever is funding them.""

    Or, more properly, 97% of what scientists can publish agrees with whomever is funding the study. It's a type of publication bias - studies that aren't turning out as the funding source expected might get stopped, or pulled before publishing.

  • opaone
    last month

    "97% of scientists agree with whoever is funding them."

    :-)


  • c9pilot
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Congratulations on the new home. I do hope that your inspections and appraisal go well.

    However I do feel compelled to comment because this thread has gone berserk. Would this kitchen be a deal breaker? For me, if I hadn't budgeted for a big renovation ASAP, yes. But that's me and my family. We spend a lot of our time at home in the kitchen. We cook nearly all of our meals at home, and invested in high quality appliances and a great kitchen design so that we can enjoy the time we spend there.

    Frankly, despite what some of the others have said, this is not a great kitchen design. I think you'll find that the first time you cook a simple dinner with an entree, two side dishes and a salad, feed four people and clean up. Of course you're cleaning while you proceed. You'll be traipsing across the kitchen from the fridge to the sink to wash and prep veggies. Then around the DW to cook with no prep or drop zone on that tiny cooktop island. It's hard to tell how wide the counters are on either side, but I need 24" minimum. I've rented in a kitchen with 12" and I hated it every day. Besides scrubbing the grease off the cabinets nearby because there was a microwave hood thing vice a real venting hood.

    And I agree with not much much clear counter space behind the stovetop and a walkway around it to get to the sink or fridge, that it is a much higher risk than a wall installation or island with a raised bar or really at least 12-18" around it.

    And it does look dark to me, with all the lights on in the photos. You might be able to replace with brighter lighting. If those are CFL's, maybe they were just turned on and hadn't come up to full brightness yet when the photos were taken.

    But it's not black or white. The decision is whether you can live with the inconvenience or not. It would make me crazy and I don't even have small kids to worry about. They'd be banned from the kitchen while I was trying to cook. Perhaps you don't spend as much time in the kitchen. This is perfectly fine for a minimal cook. There's lots of counterspace and hopefully the lowers are all pullouts. It's pretty to look at. Good luck!

  • Shannon_WI
    last month
    last modified: last month

    @c9pilot - you missed the part that the OP has purchased the home. Or perhaps you saw the multiple congratulatory comments and you wanted to be a Debbie Downer and be smug ("this is perfectly fine for a minimal cook"). You also missed the part about how the housing market is in extreme short supply, and people often do not have the luxury of waiting for the right home with the kitchen that meets your requirements. You appear out of touch with the realities of today's real estate market.

    @jlynn1187 - as a long-time member of this forum, I know that there is usually someone who pops up who likes to put down the happy news of others. I hope you will ignore, as it looks like you lucked out with this home, and will have many happy years in it.

  • olychick
    last month

    Congratulations on your new home! i’ve cooked for many years in a variety of homes with less than ’perfect’ kitchens. it almost makes me laugh to read how impossible some think it would be to produce meals in that gorgeous kitchen. Seriously? If it turned out that I thought more space was needed beside the stove, I might look into some fold down , hinged butcherblock cutting boards at the ends of the island that can be folded down when not needed. I hope you have many years of wonderful times in your new home.

  • awm03
    last month

    As someone who's had two kitchens with only four feet of counterspace (or less) to feed a family of five (or a cross country team of 40), I think jlynn can get much happy use out of her new kitchen. The average American kitchen doesn't have nearly as much to offer as her new one.


    Family rooms, dining areas, bedrooms, garages, & backyard recreational space are just as important to a happy functional family life as a glitzy kitchen designed for military-like efficiency. Kitchens are fixable; lack of family space isn't so easy to fix.


    Wishing jlynn many years of happiness in her new home!

  • kayozzy
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Congratulations on the lovely home! I truly feel bad for people that let such little things like walking a couple extra feet or having to reach over to the counter next to you for something, make them miserable. I wish for everyone that they can find joy in life. It is a nice spacious kitchen with plenty of prep space. If you practice Mise en place, any kitchen will work perfectly.

    For grease splatters, here you go: Grease Splatter Screen For Frying Pan Cooking - Stainless Steel Splatter Guard Set of 3-8", 10" and 11" inch - Super Fine Mesh Iron Skillet Lid- Hot Oil Shield to Stop Prime - Walmart.com

  • opaone
    last month

    The kitchen can always be remodeled down the road if it doesn't work for the OP. If the location and everything else about the house is great then for the OP and probably the vast majority of people that kitchen, except for the lack of ventilation, will be perfectly fine.

    For me I think the biggest issue other than the lack of a hood is the counterspace next to the cooktop but that could be fixed with something as simple as a small counter height table. OTOH, for as much as we cook that kitchen might be closer to a deal breaker than it would be for many people. Everybody is different and everybody's needs are different.

    .

    The OP asked for thoughts and ideas and people gave them. That's the purpose of this forum. It's fine to disagree with what people say so long as you state your reason for disagreeing and offer an alternative if appropriate. To bash people for offering valid ideas or opinions and especially for calling them names for doing so is immature and nonproductive.

  • opaone
    last month

    "I truly feel bad for people that let such little things like walking a couple extra feet or having to reach over to the counter next to you for something, make them miserable."

    For people who spend a lot of time in their kitchen and especially if multiple people are in there at once or making very intricate meals, every extra step can be a bit of a PITA. Something as simple as having to reach around an open frig door to take stuff out and put it on the counter can become a major irritant when done numerous times per day. Fine for a few weeks, maybe not so fine for a few years.

    A well planned kitchen can be a joy to work in while a poorly planned kitchen can become irritating. A well planned kitchen can encourage someone to cook and experiment and learn new things while a poorly planned kitchen can discourage all of those.

    I agree with you that attitude makes a big difference. We've cooked in tiny kitchens in Scotland and inadequate kitchens at beach houses. A good attitude and adjusments to what you choose to make can go a long way. HOWEVER, if it's a kitchen that you'll use every day for years to come and you'll use it a lot every day then paying attention to small details can make a huge difference in how much you enjoy it.

  • suedonim75
    last month

    ^^^you just can’t stop can you? She has purchased the house but you just cant help posting again about how it is beneath your standards.

    Congratulations @jlynn1187, its a beautiful house and I hope you and your family enjoy it.

  • c9pilot
    last month

    @Shannon_WI If you read my post you'd realize that I yes, I was aware that the OP's offer was accepted. There is quite a time to go before they own the house. FYI, in this market, it's not uncommon to have to put in offers before carefully assessing a home to even have a chance. The OP has plenty of time to think about if this kitchen will work for them and what they can do in the near or far future to make it work. Or maybe not.

    But I haven't been on this forum since the GW days to sugar-coat reality for anyone. I think I was rather gentle, actually.

    My new kitchen is far from ideal, too. We made the modifications that we could within the permit (to the chagrin of the builder) to make it workable for people who spend a lot of time in there. Lots of people here made all kinds of horrible comments about it, but one thing I've learned here, is you gotta have a thick skin to learn anything. And the last person I helped was so happy when I pointed out that his kitchen design was missing a fridge (LOL) and that a 3' wide walkway with a DW and range was going to be difficult at best. Guess where I learned this? Sticking around and picking up tips here. Take it or leave it.


  • suezbell
    last month

    Congrats on the house. Perhaps when the project will not bust your budget, you can invest in a stove against the outside wall with a hood if you want one. Meantime, microwave cooking is the new norm anyway.

    Unsolicited suggestion: Be frugal, beginning today -- including with your furnishing purchases -- and not just so your new home doesn't create conflict but also so you can begin to save for emergencies for subsequent repair or upgrades you want and/or need and you'll enjoy your home a lot more.

  • Alicia
    last month

    Congrats! be happy for your purchase. many would dream for a kitchen like yours! the people that say they ”could never cook in a kitchen like this” are entiled to say the least. many men and women cook for thier families daily in kitchens with much more than this one to be desired. my current kitchen is tiny with a huge 1950’s range with a tiny tiny oven, like 14 inches wide. and i manage to host thanksgiving and christmas every year and cook for my family of 4. i didnt hate every minute of it either. enjoy your new house!