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rosecanadian

Roses that do well even when you're unbelievably bad at growing them

rosecanadian
last month

Well, a lot of you know about my roses this year...they're not doing well....I've been messing around with the pH trying to fix a problem. Lime, lime, lime...then put on an acid, acid, acid....then lime, lime. All I do is make it worse. BUT...these 5 roses don't care.


1. Jacques Cartier - has about 40 buds

2. Parade Day - has about 20 buds

3. Memorial Day - a few buds and a few flowers

4. Nicole Carol Miller- a few buds

5. Night Owl - 20 buds and about 5 blooms.

Nothing else is doing well...many have no leaves.


Do you have any rose varieties that do well no matter what?


Carol


Comments (74)

  • Kristine LeGault 8a pnw
    last month

    Minshen, your Olivia is spectacular! Mine does really well and is my favorite rose. She gets no special special care like some of my divas and always looks great.

    I have several Desdemona that I would gladly give up. One has mosaic so it isnt very pretty but blooms like mad.



    kristine_legault's ideas · More Info


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  • rosecanadian
    Original Author
    last month

    Lek - Yeah, I agree...I wouldn't want to count either. Hoo boy!!


    Noseometer - GASP on your Scentuous!!! The petals look opalescent!!


    Kristine - oh my!! What a beauty!!!

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  • Diane Brakefield
    last month

    I just saw on the news that the West is in a record breaking heat wave with possibly 300 record breaking temperatures to come soon. Also much of the West is in a severe drought, including a third of Idaho (luckily not the Boise Basin so far). Meanwhile, the South is in for a possible 12 inches of rain from a coming tropical storm. What's wrong with this picture? Diane

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  • Stopandsmelltheroses 6a NJ
    last month

    I smelled a bunch of roses sold locally and the best smelling one was Memorial Day. They didn't look too happy but they sure smelled great.

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  • rosecanadian
    Original Author
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Hard to bear. :( :(

    stopandsmellthe roses - Yes!! Memorial Day has SUCH a wonderful fragrance!!! Oh my!!! Are you new to the forum...I love your callname!!! :)

  • Lynn-in-TX-Z8b- Austin Area/Hill Country
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Lek Arun-

    Growing roses in the Las Vegas/Henderson heat definitely comes with trial and error ( mulch and drip irrigation are a must)… We discovered that the meteorologist’s reported temperatures were not accurate for our area and it was often hotter. In addition, one year we checked the temperature on the west wall of the house… it was 186 degrees. There were roses growing in front of that hot wall. We went to Moon Valley the next day and purchased trees that would shade the house and rose beds. Glad to read you are having success growing many of your potted roses…

    rosecanadian thanked Lynn-in-TX-Z8b- Austin Area/Hill Country
  • Lek Arun
    last month

    Lynn, I would not call it a success yet. You need to ask me in October how many I have left.:)

    Last year, I slowly lost a few each week since May, in beginning of September, I still had several left, and I thought they were doing ok, but then before I knew it all the leaves were shivering and canes turned black. It was kind of sudden within a week also while the temperature was not any hotter than July or August (I think it was still 100+ till the beginning of October) It seemd like they decided that it was too hot to live).

    Anyway, we just bought a half acre lot and started planning to build a house, so hopefully I will have survivors to put in the ground one day. And, I will ask for advices to design the garden.

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  • rosecanadian
    Original Author
    last month

    Lek - that temperature beside your house is unbelievable!!!! How horrible!!! I think you should ask Straw on the thread The Rose Doctor. Maybe there's an easy fix that we don't know about?? Canes turning black may be too acidic soil???

  • flowersaremusic z5 Eastern WA
    last month

    I've had such bad years that I just wanted it to be winter again, so we could get started on the following spring and try again.

    The roses that do best for me year after year are Leo da Vinci, Morden Sunrise, M. Blush CAN be fabulous, but some years she's just plain boring. Cinco de Mayo is always a good bloomer, just about any Austin is suitable for this climate, but you don't have to worry about that. I still think there are some Austins that would do beautifully in pots. Darcy Bussell, Tamora, Wm. Shakespeare 2000 for three. Rosita Flamenco is reliable. Still new, but Moonlight in Paris just doesn't quit, Souer Emmanuelle seems to be a good bloomer, Peach Swirl and Marc Chagall are both going crazy setting buds, but have been last to do so. I guess it's good not to have them all blooming at once.

    We all have a bad year from time to time. I hope this is just a fleeting thing and they will perk up beautifully for the rest of the season. You are such a good, attentive rose mom.

    Diane, I think some of my other kids are coming up this way to escape that horrible heat. It'll be hot here, too, but not THAT hot.


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  • rosecanadian
    Original Author
    last month

    Flowers - That's how I feel...I want a do-over. Commiserating does help...thank you!! :) :) And it's SO good to know that I'm not the only one! An Austin (the only one) that has done well for me in pots is Bishop's Castle. It has powdery mildew all over it...except at the top, where the new leaves (I've finally got the pH good on it) are beautiful. It's trying its best! Leo sure seems like a good rose for a lot of people. I've always loved the Peach Swirl that people post here!!



  • Diane Brakefield
    last month

    Carol and Flowers, it's been a bad year so far here because of the weather. Of the last five years, 2016 and 2019 have been the best. However, there are still some bright spots, though when this long heat wave is over, those spots may have disappeared. We'll see who survives this best. So far, it's Boscobel, Golden Celebration, Augusta Luise, Morden Sunrise, Julia Child, Eglantyne, strangely enough, Ascot, Rouge Royale (has more shade than most of my roses), and a few others. I am surprised how well Bernstein-Rose is doing. Losers are Colette, Ebb Tide, Jude the Obscure (surprise), Evelyn, Munstead Wood, and others. Love Song is doing quite well, but blooms won't make it through this long wave I'm sure. Diane

  • Lynn-in-TX-Z8b- Austin Area/Hill Country
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Lek-

    I purchased the carts at home depot, the ones with the open crate like sides and bottom. One Summer, I purchased a lot of small bands and some one gallon roses and planted them in 1-2 gallon pots. The beauty of the carts is I could water the plants while they were on the carts because the water would drain through the holes in the bottom of the cart. These carts on wheels with a handle made it easy to roll the roses out from the covered patio every morning to the exposed section of patio, and then back to the covered patio around 2 p.m. I never lost a single rose... and all were successfully planted in the ground during the Fall...

    Congratulations on your new land purchase and home plans:) My last property in L.V. was on a little more than a half acre. I grew over 250 roses... successfully... Just planting a seed :)

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  • rosecanadian
    Original Author
    last month

    Lynn - those carts sound pretty good!!


    Diane - I haven't mentioned this before, because I feel bad about it....but I killed BOTH of my Augusta Luises this spring!!! Apparently they don't like acidity. Sigh. I wish you plenty of rose luck with your droughts and heat waves. Dang, this isn't easy!

  • Lynn-in-TX-Z8b- Austin Area/Hill Country
    last month
    last modified: last month

    When I first started growing roses in the desert, I ordered 10 Crimson Bouquet from Jackson and Perkins. I got tired of the redundant selection at local nurseries, and think I saw an ad for J&P in an ARS magazine. Anyway, I placed my first mail order for roses and they were delivered in July....to Las Vegas!!! I think I read somewhere "roses will arrive at the proper time for your zone"... Needless to say, I was surprised when the box arrived... Having no idea as to what to do, I called J & P , and was told to plant the bare root roses.... Out I went... digging holes and planting 10 Crimson Bouquet bare root roses in triple teen digit temperature during July!!! I surrounded the roses with manure, watered daily, and in a short amount of time, the roses were leafing out... shortly thereafter all began to bloom... My ex lives in that home, and to this day, the 10 Crimson Bouquet are still happily growing in that island bed...

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  • rosecanadian
    Original Author
    last month

    Lynn - so you did well with planting those roses in the heat of July in Las Vegas!! Good job! :)

  • Lynn-in-TX-Z8b- Austin Area/Hill Country
    last month
    last modified: last month

    @rosecanadian - I guess..., but I definitely was a bad orderer... I have had a lot of practice in working that issue out...

    rosecanadian thanked Lynn-in-TX-Z8b- Austin Area/Hill Country
  • rosecanadian
    Original Author
    last month

    :) :)

  • Lek Arun
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Lynn - thank you. I think with this size of land, I should be able to grow old roses that everyone said they can handle heat better. We are thinking about having the front of the house facing south and the backyard will be facing north. The neighbor on the west had a tall fence that like 10 feet so that should gives us quite a lot of shade in the afternoon. I am planning to put down several tall trees first. Do you have any recommendations on trees that do well in the desert and be good companions for other bushes?

    I cannot imagine planting bareroot in July. I bought a few body bags in January and planted in the big pots and those aren't do so well. Recently, I found a Facebook page for Las Vegas Rose Garden, and someone mentioned that those body bags was not recommended because of the wax coating would burned the canes when the temperature rises up. Do you think that would be the case? How about other online rose nurseries?

  • strawchicago z5
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Lek Arun: I wish I had googled "Trees with invasive roots" to avoid planting them .. 21 years ago when our house was first built, and I planted too many trees back then. Some trees extend their roots beyond their canopy .. endless work digging ditches to stop them from invading rose-beds. The neighbor did the same, planted 2 willow trees in front of her big patio for shade, but they extended far away to crack her basement foundation. Cost them over $5,000 to chop down those 2 trees & fixed the basement.

    I like small Japanese Maples trees, they never invade roses.

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  • rosecanadian
    Original Author
    last month

    Wow!

  • librarian_gardner_8b_pnw
    last month
    last modified: last month

    @Lek Arun are there local recommendations? When I lived in southern Arizona, Palo Verde and Mesquite were native trees that did well in the desert. When planting new trees in the desert, watering is important. Many people use drip systems and move the emitter as the tree grows to make sure they estblash good roots. Palo Verdes are so gorgeous in spring when they get covered in yellow flowers. Mesquite trees are legumes and grow edible bean pods (traditionally dried and ground into a naturally sweet flour).

    There might be other desert trees that are recommended for your area. In Arizona the local electric company actually had a list of recommended trees for planting.

    Nothing gets super huge in the desert, and a PV or M that would be as tall as a house would be very old/mature. Both of these trees are natural companions to other plants in the desert. Saguaro cacti seedlings will naturally grow under these trees, protected by the desert elements. It is common to see a 50 to 100 year old saguaro growing up and through the canopy of the PV or M. It's pretty cool.

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  • Lek Arun
    last month

    Thank you Staw, I will search for more info on this. I like Japanese maple trees too. I saw they have several kinds of Crype Myrtle sold here. Are they ok? I had several them grew in a row behind roses in TN and I don't recall any issue? But, TN got ton of rain and I was in that house for 7 years.

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  • Lek Arun
    last month

    Librarian, I will need to check those out. My neighbor across the street has a beautiful tree seems to have small white flowers all summer. It is huge and he has several bushes below that seems to be fine. I didn't care much about the flowers but the trunks and the shape of the tree are so beautiful. I will need to ask him for the name.

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  • rosecanadian
    Original Author
    last month

    A tree that flowers all summer...I've never heard of such a tree. :) Let us know when/if you find out the name of it. :)

  • Diane Brakefield
    last month

    Lek, better check the neighbor's tree--could it be plastic? Sorry, I couldn't resist. I would be interested in such a tree, too. The closest I come to that is my huge Black Lace Elderberry that I prune to look like a tree, rather than leave is as a shrub. I can grow plants beneath it. It has a great canopy for shade, but doesn't have the invasive roots of a true tree. It's easy to prune because the "wood" is soft and so cuttable. Diane

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  • Diane Brakefield
    last month



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  • librarian_gardner_8b_pnw
    last month

    That's gorgeous @Diane Brakefield! I love the contrast of foliage and blooms. Also love your humor.

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  • flowersaremusic z5 Eastern WA
    last month

    Diane, I wonder if anyone else has ever thought to trim a Black Lace like yours. I've never seen pics of any. It's really such a good idea to give you more planting room, plus it's just pretty to expose the trunks like that.

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  • Lynn-in-TX-Z8b- Austin Area/Hill Country
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Lek Arun-

    @strawchicago z5 provided good advice regarding placement of trees due to root systems.

    With a half acre, you should be able to grow trees, roses and avoid breaches of structures. Japanese Maples are not widely grown in the arid desert.

    There are many trees you can grow and a couple or so have already been suggested .

    My favorites trees were:

    African Sumac... I loved the growth habit

    I had multiple ash trees but forgot the actual variety

    Australian Bottle Tree… I liked the upright growth habit

    Western Redbud

    Chitalpa

    Crape Myrtle (attracted hummingbirds)

    vitex/chaste tree

    California Pepper Tree… boy can it make a mess (neighbor had this tree)

    Flowering Plum trees

    Bay Laurel

    I grew many drought tolerant shrubs:

    russian sage

    nepeta (walker’s low)

    Lavender (Goodwin Creek, spanish, sweet)

    greek oregano

    chapparal sage

    salvia ( so many thrive)

    mexican salvia

    other shrub plants:

    greenspire euonymus and others

    hawthorne

    texas privet

    boxleaf

    pineapple guava

    liriope, mondo grass and elephant’s ears for shade, partial shade… agapanthus

    daylilies

    These are the plants and trees that I remember off the top of my head, and have grown, except what was noted… If it matters, some of the desert trees are super messy…and talk about allergy triggers…. I tried to avoid those…

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  • Lynn-in-TX-Z8b- Austin Area/Hill Country
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Oh- Lek Arun

    Most Old Garden Roses are not availble grafted… my go-to places were/are:

    Burlington

    Rogue Valley Roses

    Antique Rose Emporium

    Roses Unlimited

    Angel Gardens

    There are others, but those that come to mind that have a great selection of OGR’s, unfortunately do not ship out West..

    For grafted modern roses, just remember… grated onto Dr. Huey will be most carefree of the widely available root stocks…

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  • librarian_gardner_8b_pnw
    last month

    High Country Roses out of Colorado is another great place for old garden roses. 😊


    To add to Lynn's list of flowering shrubs tha compliment roses...penstemon! There are so many wonderful desert varieties and pollinators and hummingbirds love them. Can you tell I love them, too? Two great drought resistant ones are Perry's pentstemon and Firecracker penstemon. Tried and true in the Arizona desert. Penstemon Supurbus is great too.

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  • rosecanadian
    Original Author
    last month

    Diane - what a pretty tree/shrub!! Are those white berries? You did a great job on pruning it!



  • Diane Brakefield
    last month

    Thanks, Carol. That's a popular shrub marketed by Proven Winners called Black Lace Elderberry (Sambucus nigra). Mine has grown huge to match my roses--ha. Those white things are the blooms it produces in spring. It's quite easy to prune, though as it's grown larger over the years, the pruning can take more time. I've grown it about 13 years. This photo was from two years ago, and it's bigger now. I've got new photos....someday. Diane

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  • Diane Brakefield
    last month


    Elderberry up close.

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  • rosecanadian
    Original Author
    last month

    Really unique - the leaves look prehistoric up close. Cool!

  • Lek Arun
    last month
    last modified: last month

    @Diane Brakefield, LOL, I am sure that those flowers are not plastic. The tree is taller than his 2 story house.



    Here are the flowers, still look pretty at 111F, right?



    I have seen it flowers till fall, anyone know the name?

    Lynn & Librarian, thank you for the info. I will save these lists!

    Carol, here is a three days old bloom of Apricot Candy. With this kind of heat, the bloom still looks pretty. Even I don't want to be outside at all, I ran out to take a picture of the neighbor tree (for Diane) and ran back in the house. These days, the temperature is already at 95F at 7 AM.



    Two weeks ago, I got this one from clearance carts from Home Depot for $10. I cleaned her up, changed into a bigger pot and put her under a tree. Her flowers just started slowly open yesterday and they look pretty good, right?

    Miranda Rambert



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  • Lek Arun
    last month

    Oh and look what I found from Maggie today?


    Two new suckers!

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  • Lynn-in-TX-Z8b- Austin Area/Hill Country
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Lek Arun-

    Your second image of the tree looks like it could be a Chitalpa Tree.

    Edited to add… now that I think about that bark… the 1st image reminds me of what I saw on my Chitalpa trees… I remember thinking something was wrong with it….


    My apologies for the hijack @rosecanadian

    rosecanadian thanked Lynn-in-TX-Z8b- Austin Area/Hill Country
  • Diane Brakefield
    last month

    Lynn, do you mean a catalpa tree, or is that a different tree from the one you are talking about? Catalpa's grow around Boise, and even a street is named after them. Lek, I'll take your word for it about the non plastic flowers--ha. Your roses look better than the 100s I just deadheaded off my rose bushes, and I have been doing that for days. It's a horrible mess. We're about 90F at nine o'clock right now. I'm sure LV is worse. Lynn has heard this story, though she may not remember it. Way back in 1972, I crossed the desert from LA to LV in an un-airconditioned car with a four year old in the back seat. I had no idea how bad the heat was going to be. The heat came up through the car's floor, and I couldn't even grip the steering wheel. I was really worried about my little girl. Anyway, Baker, California, loomed ahead, and the sign by the side of the highway said 126 degrees. In desperation, I pulled into a restaurant. I got out of the car and my pants fell down! The elastic waist had failed from the heat. I'll stop at this point, but we survived. And you want to grow roses in this climate? Diane

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  • Lek Arun
    last month
    last modified: last month

    @Diane Brakefield that is so funny. Last year, my husband had a handyman came in to do some work and service the air conditionings (they were working fine, but we heard from a radio that in the desert, air conditioning only last for 11 years) after he left, the air conditionings started blowing only hot air. That night, we all stayed downstairs and couldn't sleep. It was too hot, this was late September. I told my husband that he better called that guy back. Our air conditionings were fine until he showed up, even though it had been more than 11 years that we lived in this house. Next day,, he came back and within 10 minutes they were working again. I think he forgot to do something. :(

    Also, here is what I found from Google, Diane.

    "who would have thought such a terrific tree would be the result of a cross between desert willow and catalpa? Chitalpa certainly inherited the best of both parents, so it really is an outstanding performer in just about any desert garden!"

    Lynn, I think that is the tree. Is this tree invasive? I read that it is drought tolerant. Would it do ok with a flower bed around it? Or just plant at the end or on its own?

    rosecanadian thanked Lek Arun
  • Diane Brakefield
    last month

    How interesting, Lek. I learned something new, since I had no idea about the cross between the catalpa and desert willow. That's pretty funny about the AC. Las Vegas is a place where you couldn't survive without one. I was told back in 1972 that I made it across the desert that day to LV because the car had no AC and didn't overheat because of that. There were cars pulled off all along the Highway with engines burning up. At the hotel in LV, someone had burnt out the engine of their new car because they had kept driving, rather than pulling over. I saw it parked in the parking lot all burnt up. What an adventure that trip was (I was meeting my parents in LV for the weekend). Good luck finding trees that like the desert. Diane

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  • rosecanadian
    Original Author
    last month

    Lek - oh say it isn't so!! 95F at 7 a.m.??? Shudder! I couldn't bear that. It was 16C/61F here today. What a strange tree...looks like it has bromeliads all over it. Oooh!!! I really love your Miranda Lambert!! It doesn't seem to mind your heat. You got that for $10?? Great price and great job in giving it TLC!!


    Lynn - hijacking is not a thing on one of my threads. No worries...everything has equal value here. :)


    Diane - !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Oh my goodness!!! It was the cherry on the top of your awful day, I'm sure. But in hindsight (pun intended) it's quite funny. Oh my!!! I have never been in that kind of heat and hope to never be.

  • Lynn-in-TX-Z8b- Austin Area/Hill Country
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Lek-

    The Chitalpa is a beautiful tree that is widely grown in Vegas. Now that it is on your radar, you will likey see it growing in so many places around the valley. I grew multiples of this flowering, drought tolerant tree (front and backyard) , which has leaves I found aesthetically pleasing. Leaves matter to me... The two that I grew in an island bed were closest to plants, however, I did not plant anything around it's base... The Chitalpa was actually two of the 3 trees we purchased to shade the side of the house that was 186 degrees on a wall one Summer. We also planted and watered our trees in a way that encourages the roots to go down for water versus spreading all over the place. We ALWAYS hired professionals to plant our trees... You live in Las Vegas, and thus know it in no way looks like a barren waste land or sand, rocks and cacti... Professionals and residents have mastered growing plants, even creating lush landscapes in the desert...you will too :)

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  • Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR
    last month

    I'm trying to grow a Cramoisi Superior Climbing rose up a Chitalpa tree.

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  • Lynn-in-TX-Z8b- Austin Area/Hill Country
    last month
    last modified: last month

    @Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR

    That will be a striking combination!! When I grew Cramoisi Superior, I planted it behind a Western Redbud, with hope for a similar effect, although it would have been a brief look due to the short bloom period of the Redbud...and reliance on the C.S. to actually be in bloom at the same time... The timing never synced... The Chitalpa is such a better choice...

  • Nippstress Nebraska z5
    last month

    Diane not only is that a stunning example of a Black Lace Elderberry, but also I'm amazed that it let you prune it that way. Mine is a total diva about pruning. Cut mine anywhere back of the blooms even slightly - like maybe tip pruning or cutting off a few crispy leaves - and the entire branch rather dramatically dies down to the ground. Every time. No exceptions. I even have some thick branches that are totally dead that I'm leaving for fear of disturbing the rest.


    I've gotten so I don't do anything but finger prune off the blooms and I do even that gingerly so that I don't disturb anything else about Her Highness's eccentric hair-do. Mine is robustly winter hardy but after shedding 50% of her branches if I dare to brush against them too roughly, mine is still rather sparse at about 6-7' of limp "I vant to be alone" lounging against the 5' wire green fence I use to keep her together and out of harm's way.


    Yep, she's my Greta Garbo of shrubs. Suited for Sweden and lovely when she's happy but a spoiled headache when she's not.

    Cynthia

  • Diane Brakefield
    last month

    Good grief, Cynthia. I could take an axe to mine, and she'd smile. I hack that poor thing dreadfully and have done so for years. Maybe it's your colder climate? Or maybe you should get another Black Lace plant and see if it responds the same way. Mine sheds no branches in the winter and is totally hardy. It's probably about 15 feet tall. My friend grows a bunch of Black Lace and prunes them every year (not like a tree, though), and has no problem. This is very puzzling. Yours needs some competition. Diane

  • rosecanadian
    Original Author
    last month

    Well, my roses are doing a bit better...nubbins are growing on some and nubbins are becoming leaves on others. Slowly but surely. LOL


    My Parade Day bloom smells heavenly!!

  • Diane Brakefield
    last month

    Great, Carol and good attitude. You will be having roses bloom while those of us in the oven will be envious of you. We get into the 100s in couple of days, with 105F so far the highest prediction. I have a number of roses that have no blooms because they all became crunchy, so I removed them. The Prince, bless his cowardly royal heart, just gave up. I think he's going to take a royal nap. Ballerina still looks fresh and lovely. How does she do it? Tonight, we eat out to celebrate Clare's birthday. Again. She likes breakfasts, so guess which high toned place we're going to? IHOP, International House of Pancakes. I actually suggested we go there after a nice dinner/breakfast we had at IHOP a few years ago. They have the best fish and chips. Diane

    rosecanadian thanked Diane Brakefield
  • rosecanadian
    Original Author
    last month

    Diane - I just can't imagine that kind of heat. Horrible!! I'm so glad you had a fun time together!! (I know, because of another thread...LOL) Yeah, how does Ballerina manage to look fresh and glowing?

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