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onedevoteddame

A Custom Build Too Weird For Resale

One Devoted Dame
3 years ago

I want to build something so far outside "normal," that resale is completely shot. So, considering that....

What does everyone think of building "temporary" (like manufactured -- *not* modular -- homes), so that whenever my family passes away, the land can be easily/inexpensively cleared off and sold?

[The current idea is to build a main house with several little cottages around it -- like 4 or 5 -- and *maybe* even split the "main" house into 3 or more separate-but-connected buildings. This family village would serve my special-need family of 9, plus my parents, and perhaps my in-laws at some point. I'm in Texas, and yes, I will consult with the county on zoning, etc., but I understand things are very forgiving here. We are, and will be, outside city limits.]

I'm thinking that the houses would eventually be leveled, anyway, even if we had them stick-built. If we have manufactured homes instead, most of them could be sold off (even if just for pennies on the dollar), or even donated to families in need. They could be reused instead of just torn down and thrown away.

Property proceeds would go toward funding caregiving services for the kids after my husband and I leave this world. Assuming I have few/no grandchildren (which is a distinct possibility).

In the meantime, we would enjoy much lower property taxes, which will benefit us now, in old age, and our kids (more money will be set aside in a trust fund for future expenses). I want to minimize the kids' tax burden, since they will be unlikely to afford a huge bill -- even if all 7 of them band together -- therefore reducing the chances they will lose everything (our current tract house appraised at $310,000 this year, with a tax liability of $8200 for 2021; $680 per month is not insignificant).

I am aware of the social stigma of manufactured housing. My life is already filled with several social stigmas, lol, so it's not like it would make much of a difference. ;-) I am also aware of the value depreciation and common issues with manufactured homes.

If -- big if -- one or more of the kids can live a life similar to that of a neurotypical person, then they would have the opportunity to either keep the family village as-is, build stick homes themselves, or sell.

Explore this option with me, if you will. I am specifically looking for criticism, so that I can logically work through the holes in this plan, and y'all are *full* of experience, knowledge, and ideas!

Thank you! <3

Comments (36)

  • jmm1837
    3 years ago

    Is this a set up that your kids are going to be able to manage when you're gone? Are they able to function independently or will they require assistance? If the latter, there's no way I would create a compound out in the country away from support services. I have a family member who has special needs, and her parents have set up a trust for her but are also arranging community support networks for when they can't manage any more. That means being where the services are.

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  • One Devoted Dame
    Original Author
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    We are working toward maximizing independent living. Some have a greater chance of success than others. Sticking together will help all of them, since they each have different abilities and strengths.

    There are county islands literally in the middle of towns/cities here. Grocery stores (and other services, ERs, etc.) are a short bike ride away. So, even if no one can drive a car, they can hook up a wagon/sidecar/all-terrain baby stroller thingy to a bicycle.

    Edited to add: We have a great support system of family friends and church here, which will be especially valuable later on.

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  • PRO
    Virgil Carter Fine Art
    3 years ago

    Well...some random thoughts (none of which may be appropriate or applicable):


    --The more buildings the more the upkeep and maintenance. Initial costs will probably be greater as well, given the numerous site work conditions, foundations, building skins, systems, roofing and innards...so if first cost and upkeep are issues, the concept may not meet the practicality test...


    --You have my admiration and respect for managing a challenging existing family. What will life be like if you add your parents and in-laws to your immediate family and environs? What happens if your or your spouse have a change in your health and obvious strength and parental leadership. Will a village help or make like more challenging?


    --I'm learning that there are so many "life phases" which many of us go through as time passes (I never thought about this as a youngster) that a "forever" house is almost an oxymoron for me. For example, sooner or later many of us may become "mobility challenged", and walkers or wheelchairs become a necessity. Arthritis, and other ailments, may make simple tasks like cooking and house keeping difficult to impossible, requiring varying degrees of in-home nursing care and assistance. Assisted living and memory care may become daily needs for living. In other words, our living needs and supportive housing may change in many ways over time--some predictable and some not so much.


    Said differently, the residents in this "housing village" may each be at varying and differing stages of life and capability. Will an on-site "housing village" be able to support these changing needs in a positive manner or will a "village" make this phase of life more challenging?


    I'm not trying to be critical or negative. I'm really just thinking through my own situation out loud.


    Time to stop and await wiser postings. Very best wishes ODD!



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  • just_janni
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    I kinda like this idea.

    I like the shared open space. I like the independence of individual dwelling units. I like the proximity. I like the privacy and the "inviting folks over". I like the "close enough to be covered by shared network for security and intercom".

    And I even like the idea of manufactured housing. There are MILLIONS of retirees living in Florida like this - and others living in RVs full time. Why not a family pod.

    The stigma with manufactured housing often is associated with the grounds itself, as most don't own the land and so many are being snapped up by absentee owners / investors and raising rates (because these are not mobile!) while declining services, etc. Owning your property takes that ickyness out of the equation.

    There are millions more embracing the "tiny house" craze - which are often built on REAL trailers to NO STANDARDS - at least manufactured housing meets national codes - so why not this?

    And by the way - with heavily and quickly aging populations, don't think that you are all that "odd" (see what I did there) and that this won't have appeal to another family down the road. As our population ages, and the strain on the elder care systems, more and more folks will look for ways to stay at home longer. Think - family, older family member and on site caregiver having a cottage. Or - boomerang kids back after school, or, or, or....

    I think you are smart to think about this in an unconventional way.

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  • PRO
    Celadon
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    I would not waste money on depreciating assets that would be “cleared”. I’d find some place more urban that allowed multi family housing, and build actual multi family housing. An apartment building. With a community gathering center, attached to a caretakers suite, that could be for you, the parents. The big party room with kitchen attached would be for family gathering time.

    Each apartment of course would be fully self sufficient. And the ground floor ones built to ADA standards for your parents. Those would be in high demand as a future asset. Build them all ADA, and closely adjacent to a hospital, and you have a pretty valuable result. Build a couple of extra units to serve as rental income, with a business plan, and you might get bank loan buy in. You would never ever get bank buy in for a mobile home village.

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  • One Devoted Dame
    Original Author
    3 years ago

    Absorbing everything. <3 Thanks to everyone who has shared thoughts so far. I am not discounting *anything* at this point! I'm only married to my husband, not any specific ideas about housing. ;-)

    Good stuff here. Please continue to discuss; I will continue to process.

  • jmm1837
    3 years ago

    The apartment idea is a good one. My family member is on a waiting list for an apartment in a building designed and planned for special needs people. Everyone gets a small apartment, so privacy, but there will also be resident staff to help with meals, shopping and any other needs the occupants have, along with dedicated programs (physio, exercise, social, etc) for the residents.


    Perhaps, if you build something more permanent, when you are no longer able to support the kids, support staff can move right in. And the kids that are more independent still have a comfortable space to call their own. They will also have an asset that will increase in value if they have a share in ownership.


    One thing my relatives found was that, although they did have a supportive family, the younger members, who were the ones that responsibility would fall on, were less able/willing to provide that support. They all had or were developing lives and families of their own. So bear that in mind: you need to look to the next generation, not the current one, for support.

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  • User
    3 years ago

    LDS ?

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  • One Devoted Dame
    Original Author
    3 years ago

    LDS ?

    No, but frequently mistaken for. :-D

    Admittedly, the original idea came from an LDS friend I had in high school -- her grandfather built everyone's house on "The Property," as the need arose. There were at least 7 households (on under 10 acres), and each family had 4+ kids. I always thought it was neat.

  • PRO
    User
    3 years ago

    I kind of like the concept of an English Country House as built to house scads of guests, but the owner’s section is cozy and stand alone self sufficient. There’s a carriage house out back, where the caretaker couple lives.


    It’s close enough to the village that a couple of day help can bicycle in, bringing goods from the shops. Most are built similarly to the New England farmhouse, as Main House, Added house, Added wing, added extension, added conservatory linking carriage house. Etc. The idea lends itself to a mishmash rambling design, maybe Shingle Style.


    Every suite can have a small bedroom, small sitting room, etc. Hotel sized. Bathrooms could be a couple of hall baths, or en suite, depending on needs.


    I think the advantages of being all under one roof, but with privacy, and self sufficient suites, is a better concept than individual separate homes. Especially with mobile homes running 100K, each. I think you’d get a bigger bang for the buck, and have easier care for each other, if closer together.



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  • Lindsey_CA
    3 years ago

    What you've described is similar to cohousing. In the early 1990s, a woman at the agency where I worked was involved in getting a cohousing development going in Sacramento. At the time, I believe it was one of very few in the entire country (USA). Now, there are many more. It is sort of like a condominium/townhouse complex, in that people own their own dwelling unit, but there are common grounds, and a common building. Each individual home is a complete home, but the common building has a big kitchen where community meals are cooked, and residents can either eat with the community, or make their own meals in their own home.


    Ah, I did some Google searching, and found it... Southside Park Cohousing. There are cohousing communities all over the United States. This Cohousing Directory lists them. I know you're in Texas, but I'm not sure where in Texas, but maybe one of the four communities in Texas is near enough to you to visit.

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  • worthy
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    What assurance is there that as they mature the members of a special needs family and your extended family will remain in a rural "village" of your devising?

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  • bpath
    3 years ago

    You also have to look further into the future. As your children grow older, they many eventually leave the family village for a variety of reasons. Disability, immobility, death. But over several decades, meaning the property can’t simply be sold At once.

    What If you create a non-profit or some kind of trust, to continue the “village”? It would require a fund-raising arm for continuity.

    I like your concept, but it needs to last ALL of your children’s lifetimes. Do you also have neurotypical children? If so, could/would they be involved in running such a concern?

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  • One Devoted Dame
    Original Author
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    What assurance is there that as they mature the members of a special needs family and your extended family will remain in a rural "village" of your devising?

    It wouldn't be rural. Ideally. If it *had* to be rural, I wouldn't do it. The whole point would be independence and ability to go to the grocery store at minimum (without driving).

    Do you also have neurotypical children?

    No. Well, not so far. We'll know about the baby in another year.

  • functionthenlook
    3 years ago

    I don't know if this helps at all making your your choice, but manufactured homes fall into two categories. Real property or personal property. The qualifications differ from state to state.

    But generally manufactured homes that are unmovable are considered real property. They are on personally owned land, wheels and axles are removed and affixed to real property . They are taxed the same as a stick built home, have a real estate title and appreciate in value. Conventional mortgages are used to buy real property manufactured homes.

    Manufactured homes that are movable are considered personal property and are not taxed as real property. They do not have a real estate title, but a DMV title. They usually deprecate in value. When buying a personal property manufactured home you need a chattel loan. They are usually higher % rates and shorter term. Chattel loans are difficult to get.

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  • One Devoted Dame
    Original Author
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    Okay. More thoughts. Apologies if I wander around. It's late, but my brain won't shut off.

    So, give it to me straight: Am I simply being impatient, and trying to achieve too much, too soon?

    I know that I am a planner. I also know that, "When Man plans, God laughs."

    I know that I am an optimistic idealist. I also know that reality isn't always very kind.

    I know that I am not normal, that I am drawn to Different. I also know that sometimes Different isn't actually creative, but can make life unnecessarily complicated.

    Is it truly the wisest course of action to simply *wait* until my youngest has reached adulthood, when I will have a better idea of what everyone's abilities are, and where all of us are in life?

    In the meantime, over the course of the next 20 years, walk a more conventional path (standard home ownership; continue focusing on teaching the kids hygiene, as well as life skills like relationships/manners/cooking/cleaning/home maintenance; explore employment options with them; nurture flexibility in schedules/routines; buy additional insurance policies and create trusts; write a best-selling book about my family, lol, etc.)? AND THEN -- if it's still a viable option -- dive into the family village thing, in whichever form makes the most sense at the time (main house with cottages; townhomes/apartments; mini-mobile home park; co-housing community; buy an entire cul-de-sac in a suburban neighborhood)?

    Sigh.

    I need a Life Instruction Manual: Oddball Situations Edition. Anyone have one? :-D

  • john3582
    3 years ago

    Maybe make a 5 year plan. We have one kid with Aspergers and all 3 with ADD , The stress of uncertainty and what if I'm wrong stays with me now and my youngest is 19. I'd worry about manufacturers homes and ADA.. My mom lived with us for a few years and I wished we had designed things a little differently. Just the shower curb was difficult for her to step over. Could you build a family home and add manufacturer homes or guest cottages later? The main home with mother in law apartments, in 20 years the most independent kids could move into them and later a manufacturered house.Could have some fluidity in moving people in and out of the independent living.

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  • Seabornman
    3 years ago

    Outside of the city limits adds a few issues. You'll probably need a water well and septic. You should verify whether a well in that area can produce the amount of water you'll need for that many people. In some areas of Texas, septic is the only permit you will need. A septic system is usually designed for the number of bedrooms. If you decide on separate units, you'll have to pipe the water and sewer to each one. And of course everything needs to be freeze-proof.

    All of this costs money, so thinking temporary construction might get leveled in the future doesn't make sense to me. You're not the only family in this situation, so I think there'd be value in whatever you decide.

    If you like the separate structures idea, you could create a sort of rv park, with utilities to a number of pads. That would keep taxes down. Rv parks are becoming more popular as permanent residences.

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  • PRO
    User
    3 years ago

    Not meaning to push my idea but, a larger family home now, that had 2 bunked smaller bedrooms linked to a playroom with accessible bathroom, (times however many needed) could form the basis for the Big House now, at the younger child stage. Close to mom and dad, but together. Kids sharing and being together is good at a young age.


    As the children achieved more independence, the design response would be to add two Independence Suite Additions in a wing, and the two bedrooms and playroom with bath in the Big House, could form the basis for one of the Big House Indepencence Suites. The bath plumbing backing up to the playroom can form the basis for adding a kitchenette in the playroom/living room.


    Build for Now. Because you need Now. But on a property that supports Later. And with a Master Plan that supports Later. Like a strong central hallway axis on the two floors that could be extended. Or a sacrificial bedroom that could be lost for the hallway to the new wing. Plan wings on both side. And a T off of the Wing. You might end up with a WXYZ shape house, but if it were roughly planned now, and the Big House planned well now, you wouldn’t be biting off too many issues.


    Seeing into the future is impossible, and I don’t know the abilities and prognosis of your children. But I think you’re driving yourself crazy planning for 50 years from now, when you don’t even know what is needed 15 years from now! Don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good. The right now. One child might not want to ever leave, while another would want to try a different situation away from home, with new people. Plenty of atypical children can lead independent lives.


    Plan for the next 5 years. You can see that far. Plan for the next 10 years by having that 5 year plan choose the right property for a 50 year Master Plan that might never be needed. Plan for the next 5-50 years by conservatively guarding resources to be available in 15 or 50 years. If the resources are there, and the property is there, and the Master plan is there, any number of adjustments to in house or outsourced residency can occur.

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  • lyfia
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    Just throwing some thoughts out and they are all random and not related.

    A village in your area could it be sold to be a B&B or wedding venue? I sort of have an idea of your greater general area, but it really depends more on where you are if this would be something that is viable in the area you are looking. If it is a possibility then stick built would be better. Or could it be sold as a house with rental properties on site.

    Having multiple mobile homes on a property is not uncommon in rural Texas and likely would sell even with them there, just would be lower value, but still higher than land value alone. A ramp can help in access for those that have an issue getting in. There are options to order an ADA shower in mobile homes. I know because we looked at getting one to live in on our property while building, but just decided the cost isn't worth it. They are much more expensive than I figured to start with. We even looked at used ones.

    A modular home as compared to a mobile home might be a compromise. Probably a bit more expensive, but if you could get one that works for your family all under one roof, with maybe an additional mobile home then it might be less than all stick built. Ie a house stick built would likely be more than a permanent modular home.

    The cost of doing separate cottages will be higher than doing a bigger house that accommodates all based on the foundation and pad having to be built in many spots, more exterior walls etc. So doing a main house and then adding either mobile homes or taking the sheds and converting it to a small home might be a good option. This way the house and the property will keep the value and the other items could be moved off it they would be considered a detriment. I would think you're not the only family who might want a "family compound" though. BTW for converted storage sheds check out company in Giddings. I've seen one of the conversions they did. They also have some on their Facebook page. I can't for the life of me remember the name now though.

    Maybe create a spread sheet with all the different options, pros/cons, costs etc. You don't even need to know the actual cost as it can all be relative as you are comparing the different options so for example you need a septic that can handle the load no matter what so you can assign a common value to that. You can look at listings for land with mobile homes and compare the price as a percentage to land with stick built. Look at building costs in your area and look up advertised prices on modular homes, mobile homes, tiny homes (I can give you an idea there from visiting a place in Bastrop that sells those they ranged from $35K basic 1 bed to 100K. They weren't super tiny though they were smaller ). This exercise of figuring out the costs and value of land with mobile home vs. land with stick built without extra cottages might be helpful to get an idea what the difference would be in the future.

    BTW having a stick built house with mobile homes on a property again isn't that uncommon either.

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  • PRO
    Virgil Carter Fine Art
    3 years ago

    It is not uncommon in Texas to own a suitably large property, and have homes for each and every family member on the single property. Regulations, however, apply. For example, in Kendall County where I live, there is an on-going water shortage, thus the requirement for each residence to be on a minimum of 10 acres. Each and every jurisdiction will have its own regulations to check out.


    There are quite a number of developments in the Kerrville-Boerne-Fredericksburg area which have been set up as wedding venues and/or B&Bs venues, with a main house and additional stand-alone smaller houses. Such a development might help with the assessed value and potential for later resale.

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  • cd7733
    3 years ago

    Your idea is very doable and not at all out of the ordinary. I personally know of three different similar situations, here in Texas: one is my grandpa's cousin's family, two are childhood friends. (Catholics and Baptists, since LDS was mentioned above)


    Outside Yoakum, my grandpa's cousin's family have a multigenerational farm on 15ish acres. It was started by a grandparent who had a single house. Then a barn was converted. Later trailers for each child's family. There's even two RV's. (The RV's gave the idea to another cousin to open an RV park on family land for oil workers!)


    One childhood friend lived in a double wide on land owned by her great-grandma. There was her great-grandmother's house, her brother's house, and then many different trailers for their children, and then their children. This was just outside city limits on about 5 acres. By the time we were teenagers, the land was divided into each families' name and a few extra trailers were added to the land closest to the main road for rental property. Those rentals helped cover property taxes.


    The other friend's family turned their land into a trailer park. It started out on their grandparent's land with her family and another child's family putting a trailer on the land. They then moved the trailers when another sibling moved onto property and made room for rentals. Two different "roads" were poured. One side of the trailer park was for family and the other for renters. All of this beside the main house within city limits.


    My husband and I have been toying with the idea of buying land around Yoakum for a vacation spot. We'd put a simple barndo and a couple of tiny houses. That way we'd have a solid structure, if needed, that can be a communal hangout with good size kitchen and little guest houses for friends and family. But we've only been in our new build a year. That'll have to wait a bit!!

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  • ladybug A 9a Houston area
    3 years ago

    I'm surprised no one else from other countries has chimed in...I come from India and this sort of set up is very common. You can find many extended families living right next to each other and many joint families where kids do not move out.


    Things have been changing with the younger generation wanting to move away, but this set up is still very prevalent and children are the primary caregivers to parents and parents are the primary caregivers to children with disabilities.


    Multi level houses where parents live in the main floor and kids families on higher floors are very common.



    My parents live with me for most of the year and they have their own main floor bedroom and bathroom but set up could be better. When in laws visit, it's usually for several months.


    With this background, and the fact that it is not very common here, and you should not be building something that is not salable, a multi family housing may serve your needs better. That may give you more flexibility and with proper planning should things not go the way you foresee, you can rent out portions.


    Good luck!



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  • chicagoans
    3 years ago

    I was lucky to live in a really tight neighborhood where all our kids grew up together and we saw our neighbors more than our own adult siblings. The summer after my DH passed away, I was at a neighbor party where we talked about next steps and investing together in land to build a compound. I wanted that so badly! We're all empty nesters now or nearly so, and most of us have sold our big family homes. 5 families have all bought in the same 55+ community within steps of each other; 4 others have bought in another townhouse development. Sadly despite the allure of dear friends, neither location is my dream (or my BF's, who is younger than me) because we want something close to outdoor activities (for as long as we can enjoy them), so my search continues (but I still hope to end up near other dear friends.) Around the same time as my compound-housing wishes, another woman I know (younger than me) was building a house on a cul de sac with 4 other friend-families building on the neighboring lots, so that their kids would all grow up together. I'm only chiming in to say that there might be a market for other family centric 'compounds' like you are describing, even when family is comprised of friends who are closer than family. I'd be all over it! A combination of separate and social would be ideal for many people at various stages of life.

    I'm sure you have/will talk to local realtors and your financial advisor. The financial advisor will be even more important in your case with your unique family requirements. Please keep us posted on your plans!

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  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    3 years ago

    This requires buy-in from the children, mentally and financially, and too often they don't share the vision of mom and dad.

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  • shead
    3 years ago

    I know these questions might be a little too personal and you obviously don't have to answer but......


    What are the goals/reasons for having your parents and/or in-laws live on the same property as you? Is it to help you with your children or as a way to pool resources, etc.? Honestly, I would go crazy if my parents and my husband's parents all lived on the same property as me but perhaps your family dynamic is quite different from mine ;)


    With that said, you've mentioned before about some health issues with parents. Would living on the same property make YOU the sole care-giver for your children AND your parents and in-laws? If so, that's a lot to handle and you have my sincere admiration.


    How close do you need your parents to be to you on a daily basis? Do their dwellings need to adjoin yours or could you have one main house and two separate mobile homes that could be moved later if needed?


    I am very interested to see how your plans come to fruition. I'm sure you've done this, but definitely seek out legal and financial professionals to help you navigate the ins and outs of providing long-term financial support for special needs children. I would not want to sink a lot of money into dwellings for you and your parents and in-laws that would not be able to be liquidated or converted at some point in the future. I especially would not want to put 6-7 figures into a house(s) that would ultimately be torn down.

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  • new-beginning
    3 years ago

    Also in Texas. Purchased a five acre tract 14 yrs ago, husbands wish to live our retirement 'in the country' (he was a country boy). Property was already fenced, had septic and well for three mobile homes, two went with the property, third belonged to owner's friend.


    At that time husband had just been diagnosed with esophageal cancer; he lived 22 months. Anyhow, knowing he didn't have a good prognosis, we purchased regardless. The two mobile homes that went with the property were not even new when moved to the property by the previous owner, think they were about five years old at that time; seller had been there seven years (so we were purchasing 12 yr old mobile homes).


    I will tell you that the mobile homes are still quite livable even though they are now 25 or so years old. My grandson, his wife, their two kids lived in the double wide. I lived in the single wide. My brother and sister-inlaw bought a mobile home and lived in it on the third spot for several years, eventually selling it to grandson.


    Two years ago grandson/wife/kids bought a home the next town over, with a garage apartment (where I live) and the mobile homes have been rented for two years. We put the property up for sale in late Feb., got two offers within a few days, will be closing end of month (long closing due to giving renters time to locate new place to live).


    I will tell you a couple of things to consider: check out the manufacturer of the 'manufactured' (i.e. mobile home) well, visit the factory if possible, choose wisely (my brother wanted thicker walls so he 'lost' any overhang on the roof (rain runs right down the siding). Secondly, our selling price is TWICE what we paid for the property 14 years ago.


    We will have control of the property for another two weeks if you would be interested in visiting (Waller County).

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  • One Devoted Dame
    Original Author
    3 years ago

    Could you build a family home and add manufacturer homes or guest cottages later?

    The original plan was definitely to build the main house now, and build guest houses as needed. I never really thought to deliberately do mixed stick/mobile. Hmmm.

    You're not the only family in this situation, so I think there'd be value in whatever you decide.

    It is *so hard* for me to think this way, lol, since I can't seem to find an existing property that would work for us. I really hope you're right. <3

    Not meaning to push my idea but, a larger family home now, [....]

    No pushing felt. :-D I am absorbing and processing and considering everything presented here. I deeply respect many posters here on GardenWeb, including you. I'm thrilled to have so much participation in my thread so far. A lot of great ideas.

    A village in your area could it be sold to be a B&B or wedding venue?

    Yes. My current favorite lot/parcel can't support something like that (parking and interstate access issues), but other properties I'm considering can.

    What are the goals/reasons for having your parents and/or in-laws live on the same property as you? Is it to help you with your children or as a way to pool resources, etc.?

    Roughly 10 years ago, I started talking with my mom about my family village idea (in the context of my kids *only*, not extended family), and over the years, she decided that she wanted in on it, too, as a way to pool resources during my folks' retirement.

    I, however, am not expecting any assistance with the children (none has ever been offered in earnest, none has ever been requested), nor am I expecting an inheritance, from either set of parents.

    I simply want to have the option of more easily caring for them, if they choose me as their end-of-life caregiver. I would like to be able to accommodate the people who need me, without going absolutely bonkers due to lack of space and/or insufficient design/planning.

    Would living on the same property make YOU the sole care-giver for your children AND your parents and in-laws?

    Yes.

    My husband worries about this, a little bit, but I honestly cannot see a greater use of my life than serving loved ones. I have a bit of experience caring for the particular special need that my kids have (by virtue of having so many with the same problem; my oldest is mid-teens), and I also have personal, live-in experience caring for disabled elderly family for 10 years.

    Granted, I've never done both at the same time. But the kids are getting older, and are able to help with each other, so I have hope that where there's a will, there's a way.

    How close do you need your parents to be to you on a daily basis?

    Whatever their preference/needs would be, given their situations at the time; obviously this is likely to change as they age.

    Do their dwellings need to adjoin yours or could you have one main house and two separate mobile homes that could be moved later if needed?

    Both are options.

    I will tell you that the mobile homes are still quite livable even though they are now 25 or so years old.

    This is *very* good to know. Thank you! <3

  • lyfia
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    Here's the shed option which the layouts are similar to single wide mobile homes in the larger ones, but you would set it on a foundation so it would be more permanent. I remember the cost being reasonable.

    https://enterprisesupercenter.com/custom-finished-cabins/

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  • cd7733
    3 years ago

    @One Devoted Dame My friend's parent's still live in the same double wide they bought in 1987. It's 34 yrs old. A good quality manufactured home that is well maintained can last a long time.


    It's 1600 sqft, currently tax appraised around $12,000. Their tax bill is less than $400 without exemptions with their small portion of land. (There's also a two car garage and two large decks, one covered.)

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  • new-beginning
    3 years ago

    with any home and especially so with a manufactured home, 'well maintained' is the key. The double wide I referred to earlier had horrible siding when we purchased the property (it looked like Masonite!) and we replaced the entire thing with Hardi-Plank (and insulated the wrapped it at the same time).

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  • new-beginning
    2 years ago

    ^^^^^^ well, the sale closed this afternoon; initial purchase cost: $140K, 14 years ago almost to the date (middle of June 2007); sale price: $310K.

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  • One Devoted Dame
    Original Author
    2 years ago
    last modified: 2 years ago

    Wow! Even after inflation adjustment, $310k is a seriously *significant* increase. I guess (almost) everything I read about manufactured/mobile homes declining in value isn't the case. <3 Thank you so much, New. <3

    This really helps in the decision making process. <3 Not gonna lie, there is something appealing about the simplicity and humility of a manufactured/mobile home, regardless of the dominant cultural views of them. I'm neutral on the idea of a manufactured home, in and of itself, so positive experiences/information is great!

  • new-beginning
    2 years ago

    the main value is in the land; two of the mobiles were already 12 years old (or thereabouts) when we purchased. The third one is about 10 yrs old. They do decline a lot when new ( just like a new vehicle); however, again like a vehicle that is well maintained, they do reach a level where there is an actual value that starts to stay pretty static.

    In 2005 I purchased, brand new, a Chevy Colorado club cab truck (about $20K I think). I am still driving that vehicle 16 yrs later, almost 200K miles, with (cross your fingers) the original engine and transmission! I haven't looked to see what 'value' the Blue Book has on it (if they even list a value based on the age), but it still looks almost like new, still runs great, gets me where I need to go.

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  • raulporter1
    2 years ago

    I dont listento realtors. they tell you one bedrooms wont sell, they will. they tell you paint color, count…… They sell to the masses, you only need ONE buyer.

    One Devoted Dame thanked raulporter1
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