Beautiful Native Plants

Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

I long for the natural world that once was, but is no more. We try to save what remains, but the majority of humans don't really care about the wildlife dissappearing. They are more concerned about their own needs, and not the needs of the fellow creatures we share this planet with. Our natural world is getting run down on the highway of human selfishness and greed just like all the animals getting run down trying to cross from one fragmented remnant to the next. People now use the streets that pass by our last natural areas as garbage cans, more interested in keeping their cars neat than in preserving a natural place for the lifeforms that depend on it. When I was a child over 50 years ago there was an abundance of insects and birds. Butterflies were plentiful with many more varieties than are seen today. There are still species out there unknown to science. Will they be discovered and named before a bulldozer makes them dissappear forever?

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)


The first spring flowers will be blooming soon. These are some of the first plants to bloom in my gardens.

Virginia Bluebells, Mertensia virginica

Common Blue Violet, Viola sororia

Well, not in my gardens, and already done blooming, but still beautiful in early spring, Skunk Cabbage, Symplocarpus foetidus

Mayville, Podophyllum peltatum

Primula media

Packera glabella

Spring Beauty, Claytonia virginica

Goldenseal, Hydrastis canadensis

Dutchman's Breeches, Dicentra cucullaria

White Trout Lily, Erythronium albidum




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javiwa

Found it!


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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

I also found it! Ordered a Ipomoea macrorhiza. I am hoping my pandurata is going to come back, but who knows since it was not really doing much last year. And I am not able to find it as a plant.

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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

The first flowers I'll see this spring in my yard will be Sanguinaria canadensis and Cardamine diphylla, which is sticking its leaves up already. Bunch of stuff will be coming back this year, can't wait. My Lobelia cardinalis over-wintered as rosettes and I am excited about that.

I checked the herbarium consortium database for Thaspium trifoliatum, and there were a lot of results in my area! This must have been a somewhat common plant in the past, I'll be on the hunt for it this spring. I see yellow umbellifer type flowers on some roadsides but I thought it was Barbarea vulgaris or at best Packera or Zizia. I will have to pull over and take a closer look, and head to areas with lower deer pressure to search for the purple type.


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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

Those 2 ephemerals are the 1st here too. I want the red flowered T. trifoliatum var trifoliatum too. I have most of the indoor seeds potted up, and under lights. A few seeds had to get 30 days CMS, and I didn't realize it until today. I used coffee filters and then right after that the condiment cups were delivered. I'm leaving it. I hope I can get a few Lobelia cardinalis plants locally. Didn't you winter sow some Thaspium?

Thaspium trifoliatum var trifoliatum, Purple Meadow Parsnip



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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

I did wintersow some Thaspium seeds from Prairie Moon, it's the yellow type. I want to get some Cardamine concatenata from Bowmans Hill this spring too.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

The Cut Leaved Toothwort is very common here, but I don't recall seeing C. diphylla. I was just looking at Jeffersonia diphylla and it occurs in my county. I'm tempted to order a couple plants. It will be interesting to see what comes back this year. I have plants tucked in all over the place.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

That morning glory blooms at night. The pandurata should be doing fine growing in SC.

The minute you step across the border into NC, it becomes a noxious weed. Ipomoes pandurata.

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

Ha ha! Tells you something about my seed starting skills if I try 3 times with different batches of seeds and end up with a single, struggling plant :)

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

There were a couple still in a pot. If they return I'll send them to you. I going to start a few more seeds too.

I don't know if I'm that brave LOL. It would be cool, because there's lots to look at in there, rather than a boring, sterile lawn. This looks like my street.

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

That’s a brave person! Our HOA doesn’t really say much though. We do have to have it mowed 10 feet from the curb. Not that I am seeing many flower beds around my neighborhood in the first place. I do enjoy seeing this guy on my daily walks though. Big bale of hay for a big guy :)


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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

I changed out the coffee filters on the seeds I sowed a few weeks ago. I think they were just starting to get moldy. Keep an eye on yours!


There's legislation to promote native plants at the federal level. Read it over and maybe contact your reps to support it!

https://stefanik.house.gov/media-center/press-releases/stefanik-cartwright-introduce-legislation-promote-native-plant-species?fbclid=IwAR0FrZ7aM3TEf4TBOfa2MQMAVFAHU-hiSg-jZ8n7p9jgP2M0yrG2iUJfD9A


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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

That's the only way things will change for the better, is if they start enacting laws. Like start giving fines to all land owners who have invasives on their properties. If things were as they should be, they wouldn't need to cart European honeybees around to pollinate crops, etc.

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

How would you enforce that? Can’t send botanists through people’s backyards to write tickets. Wish the critters would wait a bit with the nest building. The nice temperatures are not going to last. Wren is going at it in my pot jungle. I was actually going to use that pot. Oh well, it can wait. Little bee was digging hers

Jay, you still need practice? This weed is a real pain to pull. Connected by kind of rubbery feeling roots. At least until they snap and stay in the soil.


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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

Is it bindweed? I see the leaves are sagittate.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

Sheep Sorrel, Rumex acetosa, the whole plant is edible. The leaves and root are a dead giveaway. It's not native. Yes they can send botanists into people's back yards to write tickets. $50 fine for bush honeysuckles and $100 for European buckthorns. I'd love to have that job. You can just forage in your back yard for salad greens Iris.

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

Thanks, Jay! I might have to start eating it if you are going to fine me for having it in the yard. Just looked it up, and of course it’s not native :( In my defense, I cut down the Callery pear in my backyard this week. Not for the first time. It’s not giving up. Meanwhile I look like I got into a fight with my daughter’s cat. And I did wear long sleeves.


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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

The Rumex acetosa is used as a host plant for Hairstreaks. I grow 2 kinds of dock.

I have this Rumex altissima. It's a host plant for about 7 species of leps. I've never seen anything eating it. It gets big and I cut it to the ground and it will grow back fast and flower again. It has rubbery roots too.

This is Rumex sanguineus, Bloody Dock. It's edible too. I collected a million seeds from it. Callery pears are a $250 fine.🤣

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

250 sounds cheap for these. Have you ever encountered these thorns? You could offer a dozen college students with strong backs and chainsaws instead of a fine.

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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

I'd prefer less punitive laws. Don't want to punish people that are unaware of, or are unable to deal with, invasive plant problems. I'd rather create incentives to plant natives, remove invasives, and use sustainable practices. Give credits for having stored carbon and credits for newly created carbon sinks like rewilded areas, but no credit for making the young growth at the expense of old growth. This is actually a problem currently, the forest service cuts down big old trees claiming they are creating early successional habitat and managing the forests, but really they would be better creating the early habitat somewhere else, they are losing stored carbon, and a thinned forest may be less resistant to fire. Leslie Sauer gave a talk about it at the NPSNJ conference, stressed forest science over forestry science. The first is concerned with habitat, biodiversity, and carbon storage, and the other is concerned with "timber".

The bloody dock looks cool. I have Rumex obtusifolius on my property, it is really a tough weedy plant. Not my favorite. Just like Jay said, you can cut it down or mow it a bunch of times and it'll still come back, flower and set seed.


Great job getting after the bradford pear, Iris. I think I have one of these at the back of my lot, I need to take pictures of it and get rid of it if so.

I picked up a couple float valves to add to the sand beds. I'm going to place a bucket partially buried on the outside of the sand bed, put the float valve in it, connect float valve to rain barrel, pipe the bucket to the sand bed. When the water level drops due to plant uptake and evaporation the float valve will open and refill it. The level will remain the same in the bucket and the bed, giving the plants as much water as they want. Could probably grow some nice bog plants directly in the sand at some point.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

I want to make a smaller sized bog, maybe 6' x 6'. I have to move a few taller plants to do it. Your sand box sounds cool. I was exaggerating about the fines. But all these people that don't know they are harboring invasives need to be educated about them for starters.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)


All my vines present and coming this year.

Apios priceana, Price's Potato-bean

Lonicera sempervirens, Trumpet Honeysuckle

Cynanchum laeve, Honeyvine, Bluevine Milkweed

Matelea obliqua, Climbing Milkvine, Northern Spinypod

Passiflora lutea, Yellow Passionflower

Clematis occidentalis, Western Blue Virgin's Bower

Clematis pitcheri, Bluebill

Clematis virginiana, Woodbine, Devil's Darning Needles.

Menispermum canadense, Moonseed Vine

Codonopsis pilosula, Dangshen

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)


Apios americana, American Groundnut, Hopniss

Gonolobus suberosus, Angelpod, Spinypod

Aristolochia tomentosa, Wooly Pipevine

Smilax hispida, Bristly Greenbriar

Ipomoea pandurata, Man of the Earth, Wild Potato Vine, Manroot

Ipomoea lacunosa, Whitestar, Pitted Morning Glory

Strophostyles helvola. Annual Sand Bean, Trailing Fuzzybean

Dioscorea oppostifolia, Cinnamon Vine

Clematis viorna, Vase Vine, Leatherflower

Ipomoea quamoclit


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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)



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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

Jay, that’s a lot of different vines. Do you grow them on a fence? Trellis? Or up trees? My Ipomoea macrorhiza already arrived. No wonder one of the common names is large root morning glory. Hope it will grow well.


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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

Is that Morning Glory a host plant for anything? The tuber is edible. Something nibbled on my pandurata last year.

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

I have no idea. As long as the deer don’t eat it. But it looks like it’s going to be a nice one for the hummingbird moths as nectar source once it is blooming.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

















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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

Nothing as fancy going on here, but things are waking up.


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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

Lovely, Iris. Whats the second one, Phlox?


Jay, I'm pretty sure the aliens are just using earth to grow those Puyas. They'll be back to whipe us out for disturbing them

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

Skip, it’s the sand phlox. Phlox bifida. Native a state over from here. Close enough since it at least survives in the sandy gravel right next to the driveway.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

Iris, I was wishing that the Sand Phlox was native by me, and you know what, it is. It's in my county also.

Phlox bifida.

A brand new friend from the southern INPS chapter. Very short video about IDing invasive bush honeysuckles in winter.

https://youtu.be/japr_oP6XDg

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)


Camassia scilloides. I need a few more of them.

Wild Hyacinth blooming in Texas now.

Adam Black


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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)


Frasera caroliniensis

The seeds need a cold, moist period. I just found out they die after they bloom. You have to plant new ones every year.

https://www.illinoiswildflowers.info/savanna/plants/am_columbo.html#:~:text=The%20seeds%20require%20a%20dormant,are%20not%20often%20available%20commercially.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)










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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

Let’s see if I can get one to grow before thinking of doing it every year :) Lots of rain expected next week, but after 2 weeks of no rain, I can use some.

Do I want these? There are a lot, but they are easily pulled. So maybe they are not too bad news? Wonder how things are going for Dandy. Haven’t heard anything in a while.


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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

I think it's Corn Salad, Valerianella locusta. My google lens told me. I'm wondering what's going on with Dandy too. Haven't heard from him in awhile. Zach disappeared also. I try to make everyone feel comfortable here, don't know what more I can do? We are supposed to get snow again. I can't believe it.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

Dandy_line is no longer able to log into gardenweb. 😥

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)


Phragmites americanus left,, Phragmites australis right.

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

That’s too bad Dandy can’t log in. I really enjoy seeing everybody’s seed starting and garden updates. I am having very few problems with this site lately.

I am far from ready to graduate to identifying grasses.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

In this case it's good to know the difference between the native and non native Phragmites so that the dwindling native species isn't mistaken for the invasive australis and destroyed. Wish there was some way Dandy could get back on.

Milkweeds, Asclepias, texana, hallii, tuberosa, (syriaca, white), (incarnata, white), (incarnata, pulchra).

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

I guess I should at least be sure to know cogon grass and itch grass. And I think there was a third one Clemson said to look out for.

Your seedlings are looking good! Hope Spring arrives soon. Gloomy here today with interesting clouds. Should have rain/ storms until Friday.


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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

Is your soil sandy Iris? Don't you get the sand bur grass there?

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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

Is the native Phragmites widespread? I thought it was up closer to boreal forest. I heard cogon grass is a nightmare, hopefully it is too cold here for it.

Noticed this on the Brooklyn Botanical Garden website, Clematis ochroleuca, native Georgia to Maryland, extirpated from Long Island, NY. Says not native to NJ, but how did it get to LI without landing in NJ? It's like a little shrub?


Oh yeah, the other day I planted 9 American holly cuttings I had sitting around in pots. I was trying to grow them large first but it's too much work and I think they'll be better off in the ground. They grow rrreeaallly slow though, I don't expect any appreciable screening from them for like a decade. I put them in the back where there was just a bunch of pokeweed and other rank vegetation growing. I really wish I could just burn all the invasive vines on my neighbors property back there.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

My friend burned his yard without a permit and the cops drove by and didn't do anything. He said it's easier to ask for forgiveness than it is to ask for permission. I want to burn my backyard. I'm just going to do it. My next door neighbor burnt all the pieces of broken fence after the tornado with no hassles. That's a nice Clematis. I hope to get all the native Illinois Clematis in the next couple years. Does anybody offer ochroleuca?

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)


Lupinus polyphyllus

Lupinus diffusus

Lupinus polyphyllus. I ordered seeds. I think I'll send some to Dandy.

Asclepias humistrata. You need this Iris.

Lupinus diffusus

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

That’s a nice looking clematis, Skip. Little thing if it’s about 15”. Looked it up and it’s native for me :)

Jay, I think I have tried the Asclepias humistrata a few years ago and it didn’t survive. Maybe I should try again. Some neighbors do burn their brush piles here, kind of scary at times since it seems they don’t know what they are doing. One tried on a sunny, windy day. Burned part of their neighbors lawn and fence.

I do have the sand burr grass showing up in one part of a flower bed. For the most part I have red clay soil in my yard. On one side, I am living on a rock with a tiny bit of soil on top it seems. In areas the rock sticks out. Very inconvenient area of the yard since I am struggling to find something that survives there to block the view into my neighbor’s garage.


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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

That rocky area is an opportunity to plant rare plants that can survive that type of area! Do you know what type of rock it is?

There's a nursery selling that clematis if you google it. I'm not really interested in getting it, just thought it was interesting.

I would love to burn my yard and I doubt the neighbor would care, he's always setting off fireworks and having loud parties in the summer, but the viney mess isn't even on my property.

I noticed on saturday my lupine seeds were sprouting in the pots outside already.

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

Sprouts already? Love Lupine, but they are another thing not working for me. It’s been a cold, rainy day here. Thursday is a high risk of severe weather. Followed by maybe frost this weekend. My redbuds want to bloom.

need to think about the clematis. It’s pretty, but my other ones are not too popular with the pollinators. I am not sure what kind of rocks we have here. From what I tried to find out before, probably metamorphosed granite that is composed of feldspar (white), quartz (gray), and mica (black). I do know that they needed explosives to get my neighbor’s pool in.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

Yeah, it would be cool to bring back whatever natives like to grow in those rock outcrops. Not sure anything tall that would be a good screen would grow there. I think humistrata and lupins like a more sandy soil. Does all the red clay get as hard as a rock when there's a drought? I hear it best to grow the Apios vines in wet clay. I only see I Lupinus Perrine returning. The others hopefully are still alive.

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

The clay goes from sticky and heavy to hard as rock really quick. Makes the watering of the little trees more time consuming in our droughts since it just wants to run off.

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

Yesterday’s rain really got the rust going. Looking really slimy.

looks like the fly also got a fungus? Or the fungus got the fly?

I took the bird feeders down because of the salmonella outbreak with the Pine Siskins. Pretty sure the wildlife is planning a riot. Deer are going after the Carolina cherry laurels again. Talk about deer resistance.

Here is hoping the severe weather forecast for tomorrow is not going to be as bad as they say.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

I hope all that bad weather misses you. I looks worse further south. It was cold and rainy here today, and we're supposed to have high winds tomorrow. Do you grow Cardinal flowers Iris?

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

LOL So funny I forgot to laugh.


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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

Jay, I hope you are right about the weather. We are in the purple high risk area. The local weatherman constantly popping up with updates is not helping. Tornadoes are making me very nervous. I tried the red cardinal flower several times, they never came back the next year. I do have the great blue one and a cultivar (black truffle) that are going to be in the third year.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

These are native plants growing on a granite outcrop in Alabama.




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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

My areas are not that big, but some color on them would be nice.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)












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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

Nice pictures. Just had one thunderstorm in the early afternoon, all is fine. Things are starting to poke out here.


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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

Glad you didn't get any tornados!

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

Morning rain kept things colder and stable. We did have a brief tornado warning in the afternoon. The sound of the alarm on the kitchen radio had the dogs scrambling. Pretty strong wind now, it might freeze this weekend. I really don’t like everything trying to grow just to be hit by some late frost, but it happens almost every year.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

Yeah, glad your weather wasn't bad Iris. I ordered 3 Meehania cordata plants today. Morning Sky Greenery has Aralia nudicaulis plants I think. I have to check it out. Still not much happening here. Nothing has broken dormancy yet.

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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

Jay what do you have that flowers summer through fall in part shade dry soil?

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

Collinsonia, Verbesina alternifolia, Eurybia, Ageratina. Commelina communis. I'm trying to get some native Commelina going, but I haven't had any seeds germinate. I've tried starting C. erecta and C. dianthifolia from seed. Not many species bloom in those conditions around that time, but spring is another story.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)


A fiver









Meehania cordata

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

Well, happy to report I dug up a little bit of lawn around the patch of sickle pots/ Schweinitzii sunflower today to expand the area. Very slow going with all the Bermuda grass. I am seriously behind with the weeding in other beds. So what am I thinking adding more space? The violets all over the place are also getting out of hand. Really pretty right now though.

Went out to give an apple to the possum. So at least one critter is not mad at me for taking down the bird feeders. Hope the Siskins are going to migrate north soon. Nice sky while I was out.


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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

I love the violets, let them run, they are green mulch. Tomorrow is the first day of spring, have some weeding to do. Allium vineale, hairy bittercress and deadnettle everywhere.

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

By the time I get to pulling violets it will be too late. Variegated Fritilary are going to get there first. The wild garlic is a pain, but it smells really nice when my husband is mowing.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

I like the Confederate Violets. I wish I had some. Allium vintage? We don't have that around here. It's a weird looking onion. You have dead nettle too. Where did it come from?

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

Some of my favorites.

Streptopus lanceolatus var.
rosea

Stenanthium gramineum

Aletris farinosa

Clintonia umbellata

Chamaelirium luteum

Pink flowered Anemonella thalictroides

Shoaf's Double pink Anemonella thalictroides. A natural occuring mutation.

Double flowered Sanguinaria canadensis

Pink flowered Sanguinaria canadensis

Pink Flowered Sanguinaria canadensis. Plants Delights, Tony Avent

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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

https://www.illinoiswildflowers.info/weeds/plants/field_garlic.htm it's in Illinois. It's a real spreader. I went around and carefully sprayed a bunch of them with glyphosate, putcardboard around to catch overspray. Its almost impossible to get rid of the bulbs by digging or pulling because the bulbs make offsets and come up as a huge chunk of soil and still leave tiny ones behind, the whole yard would be dug up. I don't know where the deadnettle came fr, it's been here since I moved in, I didn't really mess with it today. I moved a beach plum to a sunnier spot and cut up some downed tree branches.

can you guess this one?


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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

That's a Sambucus, Elderberry. I have one thats identical. They are plants that Dandy sent. I think they are canadensis. I've sowed the recemosa seeds but they didn't germinate. They grow fast. I have to move my 3 plants to where they can get big. The Viola sagittata seeds finally arrived. There were supposed to be 10, but it looks more like 20. I'm going to sow them in a pot, water it, and keep it in the refrigerator for 30 or 60 days.


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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

Yes very good. This one was actually a volunteer at the back of my lot. Kind of near where I found the Viburnum dentatum, Viburnum prunifolium, and Sassafras growing. I did start some of the seeds Dandy sent and planted them last year, but they were still tiny and I haven't noticed them regrowing yet. I didn't plant them until around October and they were just growing in a soda bottle in the shade all year.

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

Ha ha, I was going to suggest elderberry, but didn’t want to say anything with my limited knowledge. Jay, glad your seeds finally made it. Is this all you were missing?

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

All my seeds came in, but I was just going to order more. There are plants coming too. Maybe I can sell native plants at the farmers market LOL

Skip, according to that map there is Allium vintage in my area. I've never noticed the flowers/bulbets, and maybe when it's not blooming I mistake for a native. It apparently grows along the canal path that I hike on a lot. I'll try to keep an eye out for it.

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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

Give yourself some credit Iris! You know your plants by experience, the best way.

The wild garlic is really obvious this time of year. Everything else is pretty much dead and brown and you'll see much taller tufts of grassy foliage. I've only seen it in flower like the pictures with all the bulbels a couple times, where it was on the side of the road. Where did you order the violet plants from again? A new native nursery opened up near me, but they only sell species in plugs in quantities of 5, with a min order of 25 plugs, at $3.50 each. $3ea for 50 or more. If I can get all these damn trays to germinate I will be growing like $3000 worth of plant material by that standard.

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

I am interested to know if weed killer actually works on the wild garlic. Seems like one of the plants where the stuff slides off. I have to say it’s kind of satisfying to dig it up and sort out all these little bulbs from the soil. Maybe that’s why things are taking me so so long and I am so far behind. I am still having my fingers crossed to:get my Amorpha nitens this year. Even though I have no idea yet where to put them.

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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

Yeah the weed killer will slide off if you just go by quick with a pump sprayer and large droplets, but I used a spray bottle and got up real close, laid the foliage flat on the cardboard and sprayed, and a lot of the liquid stuck to the foliage. The really visible plants in front of my garden by the road, I actually rubbed with 60 grit sand paper first before spraying. Many of them I just cut down with a string trimmer. They are not so noticeable if mowed routinely, but in areas without mowing, they are becoming too abundant.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)


There are a couple things that Reeseville is sending me. The Linaea borialis and chinkapin. I think I'll order a few more dirca too, because I'm not sure the 2 little sprigs they sent last year will return. If my prickly ash doesn't return I'm going to take cuttings for rooting from the bush at the park. I was looking for seeds or plants of Lilium canadense but everything is sold out. The variety coccineum with red flowers is highly sought after. I'm should to do pop up native plant sales lol.

Zanthoxylum americanum



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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

I burned the prairie in my back yard. It was fun.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)


Braidwood Dunes and Savanna. The frogs were croaking loudly. This is the path under water, so I couldn't walk far.


You can rent bikes at the Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie. This bike had a flat tire. There are about 30 miles of roads and trails. I good way to get up close to the buffalo. I couldn't see any plants emerging yet. Hopefully in a couple/few more weeks.


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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)




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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

The bike rental looks nice. Learned Zanthoxylum is pronounced zantho-zylum recently. Not much growing yet, tons of hairy bittercress is starting to flower. I shredded sycamore leaves that were matted down over perennials, these leaves are big and durable enough to block things from growing. Some insects are out. Silver maple is blooming.


Just ordered 4 more swamp milkweed, 10 Zizia aurea, and 4 Iris versicolor. I have 1 swamp MW, 1 Iris, 2 Zizia already. Want masses of them, and pinelands is selling plugs for $2.50, cheap.

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

Yay! More plants! I should really wait to see what’s going to come back. The maples here are getting their helicopters. The first of the oaks went to looking green overnight.

Finally had some critters out today (other than carpenter and honey bees). Blueberry bee showed up just in time.

saw the first Tiger Swallowtail, a orange sulphur (no Senna to be found yet though) and this little one


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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

Wow that's an interesting one. My blueberries are still looking like sticks jabbed into the ground, no leaves even starting to form. I think the insect I saw was a sawfly.

Early figwort and Penstemon hirsutus starting to germinate in the trays outside.

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

Is this too early for your plants to germinate? Would you have to protect them from frost at this stage? I have been moving my indoor stared seedlings (just some sunflowers and zinnias) in and out. But wondering if it’s different with outdoor started perennials. Looked at my 10 day forecast. It’s up and down with the highs between 62 and 80. The lowest I see is 41, maybe I am done with freezing temperatures. Not counting on it. First aphids showed up on an aquatic milkweed that doesn’t even have a single leaf yet.

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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

Supposedly the seedlings can deal with the cold temps, the whole practice of wintersowing relies on it. We don't have any more freezes in the immediate forecast but the average last frost date is around April 20 which is a lot of time. This particular area was notorious for having late killing frosts in June, ruining blueberry and cranberry crops, documented in an article I read from ~1914, but I think we've probably warmed the climate enough to avoid that now.

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

My safe date is April 15. I am so often being fooled by not seeing any frost in the ten day forecast in the beginning of April and planting stuff out. I think it was about 7 years ago that was especially sad. Went out Easter Sunday in the morning for the family egg hunt and there were so many frozen baby birds.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

I've heard a lot of talk about the correct pronunciation of binomial names and it doesn't matter how it's pronounced as long the other person knows what plant you mean. Joey Santore pronounces a lot of species names differently than I do. It would be nice if more nurseries sold in plugs for cheaper. There's a native plant sale coming up with plugs for sale. What exactly is a plug? Something that was grown in a tiny 72 cell tray? I read a little bit about blueberry bees, and it said they are only active when the blueberries flower. What happens to them for the rest of the year? There hasn't been any germination in my winter sowed pots yet, but some plants in the ground are starting to come back. The milkweeds, fascicularis and subverticillata are coming back. I thought for sure they wouldn't overwinter. They didn't even die all the way to the ground like all the Illinois native milkweeds do. Our last frost date here is May 15. I'm thinking it might be better to sow seeds that require double dormancy in milk jugs, to avoid weed seeds getting in them. I still have fungus gnats. I'm wondering if they were in the pro mix I'm using. I did the training for Plants of Concern. Another plant I badly want, but is sold out everywhere is our other Solomon's Seal species, Polygonatum pubescens. I tried to remove all my Asian variegated Solomon's Seal last year.

Polygonatum pubescens



https://www.illinoiswildflowers.info/woodland/plants/hry_solomon.html

Some Bloodroots popping up. Looks like a weedy Geum in there too Trying to get all the mock strawberries out of this bed.

Scrophularia coming back. I finally succeeded in growing a few of these.

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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

I have a similar looking weedy Geum by my bloodroot.

Joey Santore is the one who mentioned the Zanthoxylum pronunciation, I guess I should have said it "could" be pronounced that way.

A plug is a plant from a deep plug tray, all the ones I've gotten from Pinelands have been from a 38-cell deep plug tray. I grow in 50cell DP trays and 38-cell DP trays, the cells are 5" deep. They can support a pretty good sized plant.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

The pots are deeper that I thought. Joey seems to be doing a lot of new videos. Most of his new videos are beeped out on fb. I like them better with the swearing. I went to the gravel prairie.

They burned the left side this time. Last year they burned the right side.

Tetraneuris herbacea, Lakeside Daisy

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)


Asclepias nivea seeds

Asclepias nivea

Asclepias nivea var. curassavica

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

Pickens County, South Carolina

Pachysandra procumbens (Allegheny Spurge)

Hepatica acutiloba, ( Sharp Lobed Hepatica)

Sanguinaria canadensis (Bloodroot)

Shortia galacifolia ( Oconee Bells)

Photos by Jim Fowler.

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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

That looks like an interesting place. Probably good to visit in the warmer weather. I saw some pics people posted of Erigenia bulbosa, did you find any?

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)


A Comma butterfly at the Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie on 3-21-21.


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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

Getting closer to the growing season! Anyone in here growing Sabatia angularis? Jay did you ever get Triodanis perfoliata to grow?

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

I don’t grow the Sabatia. Really nice looking though. Thunderstorms this afternoon, looks like some rough weather tonight. How come my golden Alexander’s always bloom so early? I thought they were supposed to start in early summer.

otherwise it’s really violet time.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

Skip, I haven't tried growing the Sabathia yet, but I'd like to. I like the Fringed Gentian,Gentianopsis too. It is gardening time. None of my Triodanis seeds germinated. I should have saved all my ungerminated pots from the beginning. I hear from wise gardeners that some perennials can take up to a few years to germinate. I'll get some Triodanis growing at some point. I ordered a few more plants 3 Aralia nudicaulis, 2 Gentiana andrewsii, 3 Jeffersonia diphylla, 2 Berberis canadensis. That's a nice Viola Iris. I sowed seeds for that one. There's more time to go out exploring now.





Rudbeckia laciniata




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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

Iris my golden alexanders did that last year too. I heard someone talking about early flower mention that plant too, so it must be common for it to bloom very early. Mine has not bloomed yet this year, there are more leaves piled around it this year, I wonder if that has anything to do with it.

Cool pics Jay, is that hazelnut? I ordered the Sabatia today from Hungry Hook, I got 3 so hopefully I'll get a ton of seed of them. They have Triodanis too but it won't be ready to ship until May.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

My golden Alexander's bloom early too. I think I now have both species. I wonder if they both bloom at the same time? They seed around pretty good. The catkins are American Hazelnut, and American Hornbeam. Did you order the Triodanis too Skip? I gotta go look at Hungry Hook again. I have a lot of plants ordered, Chinkapin Castanea pumila, Linaea borialis, Clematis occidentalis, Clematis viorna, Matelea obliqua, Aralia nudicaulis, Gentiana andrewsii, Berberis canadensis, Jeffersonia diphylla, Sanguinaria canadensis 'Venus', Sanguinaria canadensis 'Multplex', seeds, Lilium superbum, Lobelia kalmii, Boehmeria cylindrica, Anemone patens, Trillium grandiflorum, Lupinus perennis, Lupinus polyphyllus, Lobelia cardinalis, Mimosa nuttallii. I'm done ordering plants, unless I see any Endodeca serpentaria forma hastata, Lonicera canadensis, or Pleopeltis michauxii available. I think in Joey's video of the prairie I went to yesterday, he showed some of our Illinois endangered leafy prairie clover, Dalea foliosa that was growing in a cage there. I saw the cage yesterday. I could see it because the plant material that hid it was burned. I don't get why the cage though, because the Tetraneuris herbacea is out in the open, and unprotected, and I think it is rarer than the Dalea is. PM sells seeds for the Dalea. I will know more about this soon, I hope.

I would have had to cross the swamp to get to the cage or go far out of my way to circle around and approach from the other side.

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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

Wow yeah, that's a lot of plants. I didn't order the Triodanis, didn't want to hold up my whole order for it. I wish my golden alexanders would seed around, I think there are probably too many weeds taking up space. I'm interested to see how your Berberis canadensis differs from the imported type.

Maybe the Dalea is more susceptible to herbivory than the daisy.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

I suppose there could be deer in that prairie? Maybe marsh deer that are good at hiding? Some animal chowed down on a Cicuta bulbifera. I know there are coyotes in there,, I've seen them. What I see most of the time is Canada geese. There were quite a few, and frogs too. Maybe the geese like eating the Dalea. Maybe it's because it was discovered back when Floyd Swink, and Gerould Wilhelm first discovered a remnant leafy prairie clover population there. They used a lot of that area as sort of a dump before that time. . There's broken glass everywhere and cement is in the ground in places. Joey Santore talks about all that in the video.It seems like they must have moved a lot of earth to form the raised trail area and the weird martian hills. The cops were shooting guns, which I don't get, it seems like its 24/7. That's a lot of expensive ammo to be wasting. When I leave that prairie I drive up a steep hill and cross a highway and right there on the right corner is the state police, so they are pretty close to the prairie. In the wooded area there was a lot of motherwort. I hate that invasive as much as garlic mustard. Now when I'm pulling garlic mustard, I search around the area, and kill all the baby garlic mustards too. How many years have you had your Golden Alexanders Skip? Mine seed around and are on the verge of being weedy. They usually pop up within the stones I use as borders. The wild petunia likes growing in stones too.I could possibly remove the stones for more growing area, and let the low growing edging plants just blend into the flagstone, and hide all the rough edges.

Family portrait Motherwort and Garlic mustard, actually not related Lamiaceae and Brassicaceae.

Berberis canadensis. American Barberry. Allegheny Barberry

Berberis canadensis

Berberis canadensis

Euonymus obovatus. Running Strawberry Bush. I never realized it was more of a groundcover. Cool!

Euonymus obovatus

Euonymus obovatus

Lonicera canadensis, American Fly Honeysuckle. Beautiful!

Lonicera canadensis.


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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

I planted the Zizia fall 2019, not long ago. I tried wintersowing it a couple times and it didn't work.

Gerry Wilhelm often talks about watersheds and the interplay between soil and wetlands. There was another episode of the native plant culture podcast with more about that with a different guest. https://wildplantculture.com/podcast/2021/3/24/episode-016-restoring-streams-with-drew-altland 

A lot of the invasive problems we see are due to mixing up the soils, straightening, channelizing, and damming streams. Tulip tree, Liriodendron, is getting dominant around here because the old lowlands have been filled in with sediments due to watershed modifications. The old surface soil is buried under these clay silty soils with low permeability and that excludes a lot of native plants but favors tulip tree and invasive shrubs and vines.

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javiwa

The Monarch migration is making its way through, and I spotted my first female ovipositing on everything in sight today -- pictured, on A. fascicularis.



Jay: remember those asperula seeds you sent me a million years ago? Two plants desperately try to come back every spring, then something gets to them. I have utility flags permanently in place so I don't forget the milkweed are there.

This year, Spring #3, they're developing quite nicely - longest branch is 9" and flush with growth! Migrating female also egg bombed the two asperula, so I may do a bit of egg relocation to give these plants a fighting chance this year.



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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

Wow Jay, that is a lot of plants! Do you have space prepared where to put them, or do you need to dig up some lawn first? Have to give a shout out to my willow. So much activity around there today. Lots of little bees and a bunch of neat flies.

Now I just hope it will be host for a bunch of caterpillars this year.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

My front yard slopes down and one side has 2 Bald Cypress trees. Maybe I can create horizontal terraces to hold more rainwater that would otherwise just roll off. It could make it easier to grow plants around the two trees. We've definitely messed up the soil quality just about everywhere and it has to have an effect on nearby preserves. I been able to successfully winter sow Zizia. I now have 2 or 3 Z. aptera from last year.

Java, your asperula looks good. You should get a couple flowers from that plant soon. I hope mine return. The fascicularis and subverticillata both have leaves forming already.

Asclepias texana, white syriaca, incarnata pulchra,tuberosa,hallii and white incarnata.

There are a lot of milkweed species that I have planted, but that have not bloomed yet.... variegata, speciosa, ovalifolia, latifolia, pumila, viridis, viridiflora, purpurascens, arenaria, exaltata, and Gonolobus suberosus.

Iris, I'll have to dig more beds for all these new plants. I see that Reeseville Ridge is the only place with Lonicera canadensis. I'll have to call and order a few, and more Dirca palustris. Maybe I should get a native willow too. It's impossible to order from them online, and they say my email isn't valid. 🥺

Still a few weeks away from it looking green.

We need a few days in the 70s I think.

Its hard to see, but it's a little woodpecker searching for grubs.


Asclepias hallii. They've had an early start. It would be nice if they bloomed this first year. They are an experiment. Time will tell if they can overwinter here, or not. They seem stronger, more vigorous than the cordifolia. They did not do well here. How did your cordifolia do Iris?

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

Jay, my cordifolia just looked wimpy and sprawled on the ground last year. Not sure if I can expect them back. Looks like there are some kinds (like poke and Redring) that I just can’t keep alive.

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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

Picked a slug out of a plug tray this morning that's supposed to be Phlox maculata. I wonder if or how many seedlings it ate. Pests... The Scrophularia lanceolata, Silene stellata and Penstemon seedlings are really coming up en masse at least. A ton of Doellingeria umbellata seeds have germinated too.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

Awesome dude! I got nothing yet. The weather hasn't gotten warmer than the sixties, so if it was warmer more things would be popping. I think this is the window for seeing Erigenia bulbosa, Harbinger of Spring. Wish I had guide to show me some. I ordered that wildflower book. It's loaded with illustrations, cool.


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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

Skip, glad your seed starting looks like it’s going to be a great success. It was 81 here today. Things are really growing. Too bad it looks like it’s going to freeze Thursday night. Seems these late frosts happen every year.


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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

Great picture! Is that a Duskywing? Wild Johnny Jump Up?

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

Yes it is. Lots of these Johnny Jump up looking ones in the lawn currently. Saw the first hummingbird at my feeder tonight. I asked on one of my Facebook groups and the insect forum here about a cocoon I found yesterday. Looks like it might be Cecropia moth. Never seen one in my life, so I am really excited and am going to keep a close eye on it.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

Cecropias are my favorite. There were once many up here long ago. Absolutely beautiful! Duskywings love using Astragalus canadense as a host plant.





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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

Bear Island









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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)












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deanna in ME Barely zone 6a, more like 5b(USDA says 6a, we say 5b, midcoast Maine)

Wow. Late to this thread, but so many beautiful photos. It's encouraging to read what of all you are doing to establish meadows and promote wildlife. Gives me hope, and more oomph to keep going, as creating a meadow has proven to be harder than plopping some native seedlings in the ground and then ignoring them during the summer rush. (I was hoping for the easy way out!)

Jay, my favorite photo is the Stenanthium gramineum. It is not native here, unfortunately.

Question about burning in spring--are you concerned about burning insects that haven't emerged? I'm waiting to do any clean-up till well after things hiding under leaves have awakened. I'm pretty sure I wait far too long, but I haven't figured out the timeline yet. Just starting to learn all of this info. Is that not an issue with burning a field? Wondering if only forested leaf decay is where the action is and not fields?

I've got native pollinator friendly trees/shrubs pre-ordered with the county extension. Very excited!

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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

There are insects that overwinter in stem cavities, and insects that seek out stem cavities to build their nests in during the spring.



You have to weigh the factors and priorities and decide when or if to burn. Some places will burn the fields one section at time each year to leave some unburned habitat. Some scientists advocate annual burning because the fires are much less intense and don't burn down into the soil where a lot of other organisms live. I would probably plant my meadow and then let it grow 4 years to build a living, root-occupied soil before burning it, then maybe do the annual burning (if I was allowed to burn it).

With the constraints of not being allowed to burn at all, I will identify the area where I have woody plants growing, add forbes to these areas around the woody plants, and each spring cut them down to 18" leaving the remaining stem standing. For a larger meadow planting where I don't really want woody plants, I would mulch mow the area with the mower on the highest setting, making multiple crossing passes, and leave some of the debris behind as mulch (ala Roy Diblik). Where the debris are matting down or building up too much and blocking plants from emerging, I would rake out some of this material.

This year in my front garden I cut everything down to about 12" with a weed wacker and left the debris down. Some of it I picked up and placed where I step or where I don't really want more seedlings.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

A few plants are emerging. They are doing a burn, close to my house. I'll try to take pictures.

Anemone canadensis

Prunella vulgaris

Erigeron pulchellus

Penstemon hirsutus

Stylophorum diphyllum

Trillium and Mertensia virginica.

Aquilegia canadensis

Zizia aurea

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

I have started cutting some stuff down otherwise my Winter cleanup would not get done until September. Slow going since I am trying to pay attention to overwintering chrysalis or places insects may be in. Like this hibiscus stem

had more thunderstorms coming through early afternoon. Pretty sunset tonight.


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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

A guy in my Native Plant Society group took these pictures today. I think I know the place, so maybe I'll go there tomorrow. I still need to see Erigenia bulbosa for the 1st time.

Erigenia bulbosa, Harbinger of Spring, Pepper and Salt

Symplocarpus foetidus, Skunk Cabbage

Caltha palustris, Marsh Marygold

Sanguinaria canadensis, Bloodroot

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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

I follow a couple of people from Illinois and Ohio on instagram and have been seeing the Erigenia pics for a week or two now. You haven't found any though? Did you check iNat?

Something completely removed my red bud. Do rodents rip out small tree seedlings? It was inside the part of my yard that's fenced in, so I don't think it was a deer.

Some of your plants I have coming back too, like the Penstemons and Erigeron. Erigeron philadelphicus has spread all around where I had one plant. I like the plant a lot but I'm afraid its going to outcompete the butterfly weed , Chrysopsis and other seedlings I had planted in that area.

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deanna in ME Barely zone 6a, more like 5b(USDA says 6a, we say 5b, midcoast Maine)

Iris, the sunset is just stunning. The hibiscus stem is...mindboggling. The fact that you saw that little hole in a hibiscus stem, a hole that hold life and a future--that's amazing.

Thanks for the input, Skip! I leave every single stem up over winter, mainly because I'm at the stage of life that requires the garden be ignored from September to June. But, I'll bet I can find a couple of minutes to shear some plants off to 24" for habitat. Isn't it the Asclepias that are always so nice and hollow?

Jay, you are a bit ahead of me. My Aquilegia canadensis have emerged under the leaf litter, but are staying protected their a while until temps are more consistent. We have had some warm days, but this week it will dip to the low 20s. Thankful for the leaf blankets on them. I don't have time to rake in the fall at all, so I am certainly glad all those leaves count for something in the garden!

A separate question: Pink Lady Slippers (Cypripedium accuse) grow wild in my wooded yard and the woods nearby. They are lovely, and are getting some good press as an orchid that can easily become endangered. What I find surprising is that I can find NO information on what they do for pollinators or their habitat above the soil level. They are a heralded native, but they provide no pollen, don't host any insects/caterpillars, etc. Happy to keep them alive and protected, but does anybody know of their role in the ecosystem besides being beautiful and their symbiotic relationship with soil fungus?

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

Deanna, I am feeling your pain with temperatures dropping again. It was 81 here two days ago. The forecast for Thursday night now says 29. Seems these late frost are happening almost every year. Very frustrating after everything is just staring to come up, but I have resigned myself to it by now and am not running around trying to cover all kinds of stuff. I am still going to be upset though and will come her to whine about my frozen plants :)

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Clavdia (VT, 5b)(6 Brooklyn, NY)

Incredible photos posted here! New to the forum (well, I used to post on Gardenweb back in the day). Very inspiring. For a long time I was tending native areas in my community garden in Brooklyn but last summer we moved to southern Vermont and now I am tending 2 acres chock full of invasives--but working my little heart out to restore it.

I am super frustrated by places that sell invasives alongside natives. I write to them every time I see it. If more people do this maybe nurseries will start paying more attention. For example, I was about to order seeds from Vermont Wildflower and saw they sell Dame's Rocket seeds! I should keep a list of seed sellers and nurseries that sell invasives.

Last year I wrote to a company that touted itself as a native supplier that also sold a heinous plant that chokes wetlands. Oh, it was Star of Bethlehem. They wrote back and said something like, "well, we think it's pretty!"

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Clavdia (VT, 5b)(6 Brooklyn, NY)

The Erigenia bulbosa, Harbinger of Spring, Pepper and Salt is incredible! So many beautiful plants. Some day I would love to see these spring ephemerals in my woods.

I have been looking for seeds of Thaspium trifoliatum var trifoliatum.

Questions re double dormant ephemeral seeds: is it possible to winter sow them, water the containers over summer and let them sit for the second winter? Is it impractical to keep the seeds from drying out over summer? Trying to figure out how to propagate my woods without spending a fortune or waiting for ten years. :)

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

Clavdia, good question about double dormancy ephemerals. I've decided to sow mine in milkjugs, so they hold moisture longer. I just sowed some Lilium superbum seeds and I'm going to sow some Trillium grandiflorum seeds in a milk jug or 2. What about direct sowing some seeds in your woods, and see what happens? I'm looking for the red flowering Thaspium too. I just went to a huge wooded preserve to look for the Erigenia bulbosa. I heard Pepper and Salt was there, but I didn't know exactly where. I walked pretty far into the woods and saw spring beauties and cut toothworts, but no Erigenia. On the walk back I found a colony around one tree, but nowhere else. My first time ever seeing it. Very tiny, but very beautiful. My phone camera doesn't do these ephemerals justice.










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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

Beautiful pictures Jay.

Deanna, I dont know what, if any, ecological function orchids play, other than having inherent value as unique organisms and being an indicator of a healthy ecosystem. Orchids can even be sneaky and parasitic in some species, maybe their niche was to use excess.

Clavdia, welcome to the red Thaspium search party! I'll be looking in mid May, already have a few days off.

Checked my seeds again today, lots of pasture thistle coming up, Solidago puberula, Phlox maculata, Bidens aristosa, and Zizia aurea! Even some Zizia aptera seed from last year is sprouting, yeah!

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

Really nice pictures, Jay! Looks like a nice walk to take. Chased a new to me butterfly around the yard. Wasn’t able to take a picture, but it looks like it might have been a male Falcate Orangetip. Now there would be something to eat the bittercress :) Hope it comes back.


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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

Skip, is this cold front at the end of the week coming your way, too? No worries about all these seedlings? Saw some flower buds on my Valeriana paucifloras. Wonder if they will still bloom after the frost.

And yes, not native in South Carolina, but they are doing really well. And pretty close :)

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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

Yes 28 and 29 degrees Thursday night and Friday night. Can't do anything about that, will just have to see what happens. They're basically on the ground and covered already, there's not much more but to hope they have some built in mechanism to survive late frosts. Heh, now that I ordered Zizia, all the seeds are going to germinate and grow. Forgot to mention the Dodecatheon meadia seeds are germinating too.

I have sown my double dormancy seeds in milk jugs and left them in the shade so they don't dry out. Some of the other ones I mixed with sand and CMS in the fridge, then I'll sow directly on the soil this spring with the rest of the seed mix I got.

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deanna in ME Barely zone 6a, more like 5b(USDA says 6a, we say 5b, midcoast Maine)

Skip, I tried double dormancy seeds in jugs that "hinge" so the top can stay down, and found that summer created too much fungus growth in the container. Next I will try a milk jug where the top can come completely off, allowing me to let it have good air circulation in the summer, and hoping that makes a difference. I can let it air in summer and cover it in winter. don't know if that will make a difference. How did you cut your milk jugs for double dormancy seeds?

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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

I got standard milk jugs and cut them almost all the way around 5" from the bottom, fill bottom with soil, add seed, then taped shut completely, cap off. I use 511 mix for this for better drainage, and use a thin mulch of granite chicken grit, sand, or turface. I haven't had any mold although moss and algae do grow in some especially the turface. I don't know if that will be a problem or not. I'm still waiting to see if any double dormancy seeds will emerge, this is going to be the second spring for a bunch of things like blue cohosh, maple leaf viburnum, and american ginseng. Honestly I'm still waiting for results on these.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)


Lotus Hairstreak, Callophrys dumetorum, California

Spring Beauty mining bee, Andrena eriginae, Illinois

Male mining bee, Andrena sp on hairy bittercress, Illinois

Male polyester bees in search of mate. Colletes inaequalis, Illinois

Sagebrush Checkerboard, Chlorine acanthus neumoegeni, California

buffhead mason bee, Osmia bucephala on Dutchman's breeches, Illinois

yellow shouldered drone fly, Eristalis stipator on hairy bittercress, Illinois

leafhopper found along sandy creek, Illinois

Asian multicolored lady beetle on prairie willow stem, Illinois

Sagebrush Checkerboard, Chlorine acanthus neumoegeni, California


photos by Angela Morehouse and Solar Darkroom

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

The blood flowers bloomed.



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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

Nice yours were first this year.

My blood root are peaking up now

Blue bells and wood poppy

??


Packera aurea


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graywings123(7)

Clavdia, care to tell us the name of the company selling Star of Bethlehem?

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

Very nice! Now why don’t I have blood root? I don’t even want to know what the neighbors are thinking when they see me running around chasing butterflies. But the one from yesterday came back, so that’s what I did :)

First Juniper hairstreak also showed up

Seek is telling me this grass is sweet vernal grass. Not native, but not listed as invasive in SC. Would this be correct? Trying to at least keep up with the invasive ones.


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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

You have some unusual butterflies down there. The sweet vernal grass can make chemicals that inhibit other plants, but when their roots die they make other nearby plants grow better. You can just deadhead them before they go to seed. Did you smell the grass Iris? Skip, weird that your winter sowed seeds are ahead of mine and my bloodflowers are ahead of yours? I didn't know that Packera aurea had trifoliate leaves. I don't know what the mystery plant is yet, a hosta maybe?🤣 I ordered a couple special bloodflower cultivars.

'Multiplex'

'Venus'

Stenanthium densum in Florida after a January burn.


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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

I was planning on going to take a sniff at the grass tomorrow. Speaking of nurseries and ordering plants. My husband mowed over the last of the Georgia Feverbark. After it took me so long to find them in the first place. The place I did get them from last year didn’t have any to replace them. Found a nursery in NC that does. They don’t usually do mail order, but will make an exception with a husband like mine. They will tell me what to pay after they ship and find out what the price for that will be. Of course I don’t know yet what the plants will look like, but it certainly sounds like a place I would love to order more from. They even mention “Bringing Nature Home” in their about us section.

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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

The park near my work is full of sweet vernal grass, it's actually cool looking and it smells nice. The place is also full of Anaphalis margaritacea and Solidago odora, and all of it together smells amazing in late summer.

My bloodroot and other spring ephemerals are shaded by my house where it stays a little cooler, and the flowers come up later than they should. I'm working on improving a different area for them where they'll get more sun in the spring and dappled shade during the summer.

I'd love to be able to go visit a place like that with all the Stenanthium. The NJ Audubon has a preserve in the pine barrens that they restored to a savanna very similar to that picture. I haven't been there but saw pictures of it during a presentation. Not sure if it's open to the public, I'd guess so? But it is fenced to keep out deer and ATVs. Turkey beard and fly poison are a little more common around here (still uncommon, would need a guide to find), and kind of remind me of the Stenanthium.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)


The Pinckneya fever bark is a pretty cool shrub. Never knew about it til now. I can't be tempted to grow that one at least.🤣 Is it possible that your's could grow back from the roots Iris? I ordered 3 Valeriana pauciflora plants a couple days ago and had to have the order a certain amount, so I also ordered cliff goldenrod and green and gold. Ah, I was wondering about a strange plant and the mention of Anaphalis magaritacea jogged my memory. Thanks Skip. How long have you been growing the Valeriana pauciflora Iris? I wasn't even aware that you grew them. Do they smell nice? I just have 1 Valeriana officials and it smells great. It's one of just a few non natives that I grow. I'm going to try to collect some Spring Beauty and Harbinger of Spring seeds when they are ready.

They did a burn a couple days ago at this preserve which is a block from my house. I got to see the flames, but wasn't able to get a picture.



My milkweeds so far. From front left clockwise texana, syriaca(white), incarnata pulchra, tuberosa, hallii, and I lone white incarnata. I'm trying to get more texana and white incarnata going. I've accidentally cooked a bunch of amplexicaulis seeds. They are the most important out of all my current milkweeds. I can't mess up any of my final 10 seeds. I should check and see if any nurseries are currently offering amplexicaulis plants ( just in case).

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

Jay, I just planted them last year, so this is the first time they are trying to bloom. I hope they don’t get damaged by the cold so I can smell them :) A lot of plants are getting ready to bloom. Baptisia, blue star, alum rod. Guess I will see how they do with the freezing.

Your milkweeds are looking good! Got to say the burned area looks huge and a bit scary. Glad these are people knowing what they are doing.

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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

Nice pics of the burn, the milkweeds look nice.

I found some colonies of Potentilla canadensis before on the property where I work. Yes, I will be taking some cuttings of that, more genetic diversity. There are some sedges there too I'm going to try to ID. I have a lot more germination going on, I think this is going to be the best year yet. The Pycnanthemum flexuosum is sprouting now. Lots of Helianthus divaricatus seeds I planted last year have sprouted, looking strong too


is this a fungus or a gall?

Sedge?

Dichanthelium?


im gonna start an illegal garden in this retention basin. The deer pressure is super high though. In gonna try Iris versicolor, swamp milkweed, Lobelia siphilitica, Eutrochium purpureum and fistulosum, maybe some mountain mint, Rudbeckia laciniata, Doellingeria umbellata, Verbena hastata, hmm?

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

Skip, why do you say 'illegal' garden? Looks like a sedge, are the blades triangular? Maybe deer tongue grass D. clandestinum? Are all those H. divaricatus from the seeds I sent? I always confuse Rudbeckia laciniata for a Helianthus, because they are so big. I ordered 2 Lonicera canadensis and 3 more Dirca palustris from Darrell at Reeseville Ridge today. Still really nothing winter sowed germinating yet except a couple minute seedlings in 1 pot. These tall pots work much better for the milkweeds, but I may have to transplant a few to give them even more space. I have several holes in the tops of my sealed milkjugs, so I don't believe they will have a problem with holding too much moisture. Time will tell. Weird that the deer don't touch any wild Rudbeckia laciniata, but if I plant it, they eat it down to nothing. I have 1 Ohio spiderwort blooming already. It's growing up against the south side of the house. Forgot to take a picture. Tomorrow....

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)












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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

The H. divaricatus is from toadshade seeds I got in 2019-2020 winter. I direct sowed the seeds you sent, some of them sprouted in the ground and stayed about 4" tall last year, maybe they'll grow up some more. I say illegal garden because it's just a drainage basin behind an industrial park. The Rudbeckia laciniata is supposedly edible when the leaves first emerge in the spring, that's probably when the deer go after them right? They love to eat tender new growth, the leaves get rough like sandpaper as they get older.

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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

Stumbled upon some Danthonia spicata outside work

wonder if this broader leaf one is Danthonia compressa?

Potentilla canadensis

the native plant that fills the niche that creeping charlie and mock strawberry take over

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

I am always so impressed by your ability to identify plants. Especially all these grasses and sedges. Walking the dogs this morning, everything looked yellow. The pollen really came off in clouds from the pines.

Everything at the side of the roads is purple. Looking pretty. And so invasive.


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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

What are the purple plants?

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

Wisteria.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

Some botanist was trying to tell me the woodland sunflowers I have by me are Helianthus hirsutus, and not H. divaricatus. Maybe you'll be able to compare both Skip. I remember wanting to collect a few Potentilla to fill a niche, but I brought home the Duchesnea indica by mistake. I'll add some native potentilla once all the mock strawberries are gone. That's a really huge colony of Potentilla. Is that the invasive Asian wisteria Iris? I don't think my Cynanchum laeve would be as hard to remove as a trumpet vine or wisteria, because the honeyvine isn't woody like the other 2. It was only in the mid 30s here today, but starting Sunday it will be in the 70s.

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

It’s either the Chinese or Japanese wisteria. Didn’t drive slow enough to see which way it is chocking the trees. I see them popping up in my yard again, too. Little sprigs coming out in the grass about 15 feet from where I have been fighting the original one for years. Even with roundup. It’s supposed to get really cold for two nights, hopefully done with this by next week. My poor Pipevine is trying so hard.


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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)


Arnoglossum plantagineum

Tiarella cordifolia

Caulophyllum thalictroides

Caulophyllum giganteum

Carex tonsa

Sarracenia rosea

Valeriana pauciflora

Lupinus perennis

Escobaria missouriensis, Physaria densiflora, and Lupinus texensis

Hexastylis heterophylla

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

Heros

Lorrie Otto

Doug Tallamy

Robert Betz

Gerould Wilhelm

Daniel Boone

Tom Givnish.

Floyd Swink

Alan Weakley

Na J. Pilla

Adam Black

And so many more!

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)


Native eastern Potentilla

Potentilla anserina

Potentilla bipinnatifida

Potentilla canadensis

Potentilla norvegica

Potentilla pensylvanica

Potentilla rivalis

Potentilla simplex

Potentilla supina.

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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

Nice lists. I got a battery electric string trimmer, it is epic. So much more enjoyable than the gas one. I love the little bladed head it came with too, cut down so much wild garlic today, cut through the standing dead stalks of cutleaf coneflower, sunflower, joe pye, pokeweed, etc like butter too. Covered in garlic clippings, terrible smell. Also got a little carried away and completely beheaded my sweetfern, ohhh man, it will probably grow back, right? Maybe that will stimulate it to start sending out runners.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

I don't have a lot of experience with sweetfern. I planted 3 last year on the west side of my house and they haven't grown much yet. They are in gravelly soil. The 1st plant I had was in sandy soul, and it died.










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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

Ha ha Skip, I did get my husband one of these electric string trimmers. He didn’t use it yet, hope he is not getting as enthusiastic using it. He does love his electric chainsaw. Most of the time he is getting the job done by the time it would take him to start the gas one. Plus the noise and smell are so much better while I am trying to pull weeds somewhere. Paw Paw is blooming. No frost damage from last night. Now fingers crossed for tonight.


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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

The best part is pulling the trigger on the string trimmer and not getting blasted with 2-stroke engine fumes. It's a whole different experience. Good luck with the frost tonight. I didn't even open my cold frames today to peak, don't want want to disturb whatever equilibrium might be forming in there.

Jay, the brown outer skin on my Asclepias amplexicaulis is starting to split, does that mean they're ready to plant or do I need to wait until the radicle emerges?

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

I wait for the radical. Just don't cook yours like I have. Supposedly, they don't need cms. I was walking in the area where I found Blue Eyed Marys last year, but I didn't see anything recognizable. Sunday is going to be warmer, I'm thinking about visiting the sand prairies again. They were doing another burn in the same area by me today.

young Dirca palustris in Alabama. The mother died from crown rot. Apparently all members of Thymelaceae are susceptible to it. The young Dirca plants have larger leaves than the adults. I hope mine will look so healthy. There is a wild colony next to a river in Illinois north of me. I should go take a look this year. I have an electric weed whacker but I rarely use it these days. What brand is your battery charged one Skip?

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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

It's the 40V Ryobi one. I hope to not have to use it some day, but yeah weeds are still everywhere and I have a long sidewalk in front of my house and all the fence lines. I think I have quack grass now too, I was pulling that yesterday, what a pain. Creeping charlie is invading my front bed hard now too, I'll have to hand weed that when I get a chance.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)





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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

ANIMALIA

a jay










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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

There are native Heliotropium!

Heliotropium curassavicum, Illinois, New Jersey, South Carolina

Heliotropium indicum. Illinois, South Carolina

Heliotropium tenellum. Illinois

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)
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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

Lots of pictures! I wasn’t so lucky last night. It went down to 26 degrees. Guess I will see later what damage this caused. The Apple farmers were really worried.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

That's so strange Iris, that you would be colder than us up here? We are going into a heat wave now. Even possible to hit 80 in the next week, and rain too, which is desperately needed. I was pulling the baggie dome off my Caribbean milkweed pot and it tipped. Now I have to start the seeds again from scratch.🥺

Do you know this Hibiscus aculeatus is native to the Carolinas and gulf states. I love the petal edges. I like this one better than Abelmoschus manihot. Same color pattern, but mostly because this one is native.😁😆😂

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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

It hit 26 here last night too. I just checked my seedlings and they look ok, even more are popping up. Tons of Lobelia spicata, wild strawberries, Baccharis, Erigeron pulchellus, Agastache nepetoides, Liatris spicata and scariosa. Bloodroot finally flowered too.


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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

Does your hoop house hold in moisture? Maybe that's the secret? Not much happening here yet. My Erigeron pulchellus only had about 1 flower last year. I want to collect seed from it this year. They spread fast enough to divide them every couple years,( if they are happy). I think more things will be appearing in the next week, with the warm spell coming.

It's looking like I'm in.😁

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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

I guess it does. I've been misting the soil when it starts to look dry too, I have a Fogg-It nozzle for the hose, 1/2gpm superfine. Just spent some time pull creeping charlie out of my front bed. There was a garlic mustard plant in there too! Most obnoxious plants

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

That’s a nice looking hibiscus, Jay. Need to look it up. Hope you are going to get an assignment soon, sounds like fun.

Its supposed to warm up here, too. Skip, glad all your plants are looking alright. A lot of mine do not look happy.

Frostweeds.

Sycamore

Weeds in the lawn.

On the bright side, the milkweed I was not able to identify last year is coming back and doesn’t look frozen. So maybe it will get a name this year:)

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

Take a picture of the milkweed when it's a bigger and we'll figure out the species. I think your weeds are cool looking. It looks like they are dusted with snow. My frostweed is just now poking through. I have a lot of creeping Charlie and henbit. I found 1 garlic mustard plant. I wonder how it got there?

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

I hope it works to identify it this year. Didn’t bloom last year and the Monarchs had a go at it. Looked a bit depressing out there today, but the blooms on the wild black cherries didn’t freeze. So there is at least something.

Had a hummingbird at the feeder in 27 degrees. Guess they wish they would have stayed south.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)


Arisaema triphyllum

Trillium nivale

Dicentra cucullaria

Trifolium stoloniferum

Hieracium venosum

Aquilegia canadense

Ansonia tabernaemontana, Hymenocallis liriosme

Aletris lutea

Dirca palustris

Calapogon pallida


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deanna in ME Barely zone 6a, more like 5b(USDA says 6a, we say 5b, midcoast Maine)

Skimming over previous comments, saw Skip's sweet fern question. Sweetferns here are difficult to kill once established. Mine have bounced back after pretty severe pruning.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

Somewhere in Texas right now.

Phlox pilosa, Baptisia spheriocarpa, and Castilleja indivisa.




Photos thanks to Adam Black.

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

That’s really pretty! Big inspiration for Javi! Hope you all had a happy Easter. Jay, I ordered the hibiscus :)

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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

Is that a planted garden or a "natural" habitat? Looks really nice.



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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

Packera aurea and Claytonia virginica. Adam usually only botanizes in wild areas of Texas. That's a wild area there located in Houston Co. in the photos. He used to work for the John Fairey Garden in Texas, so he visits there and makes posts about the unusual ants there occasionally. He travels to exotic locations like New Caledonia and botanizes too. I explored some woods today.

https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=3100246210228478&id=100007293883803


https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=2641663199420117&id=100007293883803



Hydrophyllum virginianum, Virginia waterleaf

Cardamine concatenata, Cut Leaved Toothwort, Dicentra cucullaria, Dutchman's Breeches, Allium cernuum, Wild Nodding Onion

Viola pubescens var eriocarpa

Mertensia virginica, Virginia Bluebells

Hydrophyllum sp. The virginianum and apendiculatum are hard to distinguish right now when they are still little.

Sanguinaria canadensis, Bloodroot

Thalictrum thalictroides, Anemonella thalictroides, Rue Anemone

A Ranunculus species? I ran into the other, rarer ramp species Allium burdickii. It has a hotter, spicier taste, but still very mild in flavor.

Iris, that's a beautiful Hibiscus!

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

Deanna, have your sweetferns multiplied since first getting them? Were kind of area are your Comptonia growing in?

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

Jay, I was surprised I was able to find the hibiscus so easily as a plant for sale. Most of the stuff you put in my head takes me a while :) Moths are showing up. Hopefully it’s really Spring now.


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deanna in ME Barely zone 6a, more like 5b(USDA says 6a, we say 5b, midcoast Maine)

My sweet ferns are all naturally occurring except for one. They have established in various areas of the understory on my property. But one determined fellow was planted in the bed of the office sign before we arrived. He was...exuberant...for such a small bed. I tried to prune him into submission, but he responded to pruning very well. That one plant spread by runners, as well. If it weren't for the small size of the bed the runner growth would have been considered "well-behaved." I would not consider the spread of any of my sweet ferns to be at all problematic. If anything, a bit more spread might be nice. The naturally occurring ones are in a soil that is definitely clay-based, but also pretty poor and shallow. There is significant granite in our area, as well as an old quarry in the neighborhood. I would imagine the granite and quarry rocks create a more acidic base to our soil. Even though I am on the coast, our soil is not only by experience clay, but also clay according to the geological surveys.

I have heard they are hard to get established, so all my naturally growing ones are left alone! I really should investigate trying to plant some to stabilize the shore.

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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

That's nice to hear Deanna. I have mine planted in an unammended sandy loam at the edge of the drip line of a silver maple. I have seen them growing in loam under power lines in uplands, and at wood edge in sand here. I've seen them on the mountain side in the Hudson river highlands as well. They seem to be adaptable. The plant I got is a root cutting I bought from a small nursey in the pinelands. Larry Weaner has written that vegetatively propagated clonal shrubs behave differently than their counterparts grown from seed by having less suckering and tending to be leggier. I wonder if there is truth to that and if mine will have enough vigor to come back.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

I'm hoping my 3 Comptonia plants return. Nothing showing yet. I'm going to be very busy with Plants of Concern and a new assignment of hunting down and recording native orchids, and my own gardens which require a lot of time. Some plant orders are being delivered already, to add the the workload. I was at a couple sand prairies yesterday.






???



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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

We have rain in the forecast, and we need it bad. No germination yet, almost ready to start freaking out if something doesn't happen. Maybe somebody sprayed all my pots with weed killer.😵🥺

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

Isn’t it way too early to be freaking out? I thought you still have a while until it’s safe from frost in your area.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

Well, Skip has a lot of things germinating already and he's only a couple weeks ahead of me. I wasn't watering the pots because they dry out, out in nature. Now I'm thinking I'd have more things germinating if I was watering.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)


Pictures from the past couple days

Aquilegia canadensis in a sand prairie

Hepatica

Dicentra cucullaria

Cardamine concatenata

Mertensia virginica

Trillium?


Hydrophyllum virginianum


wild strawberries or robust seedlings? Yarrow millifolium

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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

Is that hairy bittercress lol? I saw those wild strawberry looking plants outside work today, that might be what those are. I still haven't seen any water leaf around here, do deer like them? You have some nice plants in your preserves. I guess I'd have to take a hike to get to the places in good condition. Maybe this weekend

Yeah you don't want the pots to dry out, this isn't nature where there's ground water and soil biology a few inches below the surface, it's a pot that can become bone dry and dead if it doesn't get water. If your hose has a multi nozzle with mist that would be a good option.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

I looked at Rubus seedlings and none of them match, so they probably are wild strawberries. They were in a Rubus thicket. I could spot a lot more plants last year because they did a burn. This year the dead plant material is hiding the Antennaria and Viola sagitata. I could see any. It's still kind of early. I have some Zizia aptera blooming in the bin they germinated in. I guess I be doing some planting or putting plants in bigger pots. The ground is dry. There's rain in the forecast.

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

Jay, hope your seeds will still germinate. Violets in the lawn are still going strong.

First Monarch stopped by today!


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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

There was a problem with my sump pump line, it would get blocked with ice during deep freezes, and the place where the outlet was routed to was sending water down a hill onto a sidewalk, and the hill was eroding. I had a makeshift black flex pipe on the surface taking the water away to a different spot but that was inconvenient to get around and ugly.

I decided to dig a 30ft trench 7" wide and 10" deep and install 4" pvc pipe to carry the water away from the house. I expected to, and did, run into tree roots, bricks, concrete, and rubble, but in 2 places there were huge blocks of concrete buried about 8" down, at least 2ft x 4ft and 4" thick. I couldn't get the blocks to budge by prying with a mattock, and I tried digging around it but the edge of the block was no where in sight. Here's where the jack hammer rental comes in. It easily broke the concrete but I freaked out when I realized there were 2 steel pipes embedded in them, and I was working literally on top of my natural gas line mark-out. A visit from the gas company technicians calmed me down, they said they weren't their lines, theira were deeper. I continued with the demo hammer and broke a trench through the block, then had to cut the pipes out with a sawzall.

The sump pump pipe is going to drain to a low area, and I'm excited to plant a bunch of Eutrochium purpureum, Doellingeria umbellata, and others around it. I'm going to route a pipe to catch the AC condensate and move the water to the sump pump line too, so there will be a constant source of water even during the dry periods of summer.

My body is destroyed from this project it took from 10am to sundown and I'm not done yet, got a late start due to random rain showers. Wet, heavy, sticky clay. I got the trench dug, graded 2.5 inches of fall per 10 feet, and glued the pipe together and put it in. Tomorrow I'll recheck the grading, fill it back in and hopefully be done with it.


The sun went down and I was gluing the PVC pipe together in the dark with just my head lamp on, so I didn't get a picture of that part.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

Wow, that's a lot of work. Nice job. That will be a nice rain garden. Blue flag iris and obedient plants like wet areas like that.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)


something in ericaceae? all pank

wolf spider

Luna

can you see the moth?

My friend Frank has a business converting yards and properties back to native. He makes things appear like they happened naturally. I love the mixture of textures. He learned from Robert Betz.

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

Great job, Skip! Any idea how all these slabs of concrete ended up buried in your yard? If I remember correctly, it’s not the first time you have run into them.

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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

I know right, Iris? It's almost a guarantee that if I start digging I'm going to run into old rubble and concrete. I think there must have been a structure that was torn down and instead of disposing of the rubble properly they just buried it. These pieces were especially thick, I've never needed a jackhammer for any of the other stuff

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

That would be interesting to learn the history of those concrete blocks. 2 plant orders were delivered yesterday, and 2 more today. I have some planting to do. It rained all day.

These are 2 native barberries, Berberis canadensis. I have gotten some really cool plants. Is that project finished Skip, or is there still more? I have some major projects that have to get done too.

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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

Those look nice, bigger leaves than the invasive one.

The project is almost done. I covered the trench back up this morning, I have to do some more grading and finishing around the outlet and direct the 1-1/4" pipe from the sump pump to the 4" pipe.



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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

Jay, is it safe in your area to plant these out? I have been getting emails today about plants being shipped. Looks like all kinds of things are going to arrive tomorrow. Didn’t really expect them all to arrive at once. Woodlanders ships them in bags instead of pots (the hibiscus for example), so I guess I will need to take care of that first. Wonder if Reeseville is still remembering my order from last year. Didn’t hear anything about that.

Skip, hope you got the job finished and are not too sore.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)


a restored woodland

Trillium cernuum, I want to grow them. Nodding Trillium

Sarracenia flava.

Polygala nana.

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)












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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

I sowed my milkweed seeds, they were in CMS exactly 1 month, Asclepias amplexicaulis and Asclepias quadrifolia. Potted up a bunch of the other plants that were in the seed starting tray, Rhododendron periclymenoides, Pycnanthemum virginianum, and Clethra alnifolia.

Pycnanthemum roots


For the soil for amplexicaulis I used 1:1:1 part screened pine park:gran-i-grit:screened turface allsport. For the quadrifolia I did 5 parts pine bark fines, 2 parts turface allsport. I added some azomite, gypsum, a tiny bit of epsom salt, and mycobloom to both.

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

Now that’s what I call serious roots. Your plants are looking great! I got some of my ordered plants today.

Really like the shiny look of the Virginia creeper coming up in my brush pile.

some critter is planting wild black cherries in bundles of a dozen or so. Chipmunk?


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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

I saw more Dutchman's Breeches today than ever before, and Virginia waterleaf too. I have a lot of potting and planting to do all weekend. Good luck with your milkweeds Skip.











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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

Nice park pics, wish it was easy to create something like that.


phlox grows slowly but it will edge other stuff out, now it's taking over the stairs haha. It's going to crowd out my Erigeron and Ionactis, I'm going to have to trim it.

didnt throw out this tray from last year

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

I wish I had bluets. Maybe I do somewhere. I'm finally getting good germination weather, cool temps and lots of rain.

This Trillium that occurs in Ohio and Kentucky is referred to as Trillium flexipes, but the flowering stems on these Trilliums stand erect and aren't pendulous like the true Trillium flexipes. This is probably a new, unnamed species.






Trillium flexipes with typical nodding flowers.

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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

Interesting! Time for some biologist to do the molecular phylogenetic work on that.

I did the Volunteers in the Park training today. It was focused on trail maintenance, stuff like fixing grade and erosion problems, and clearing overgrowth. They encouraged us to wear our hats and/or shirts every time we use the trails on our own, and we could carry hand tools to take care of anything that could be addressed by one person. I'm putting some invasive vines on notice right now!

When I got home I saw the neighbor behind me outside near the property line and flagged him down. Got the okay to clear out multiflora rose, japanese honeysuckle and whatever other invasive crap grows in there. This is the wetland area. He didn't even think it was his property so now it's really fair game. Finished up the sump pump project too.


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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)

Skip. Do you grow Carex plantaganea? I have a sedge with wide leaves, but I don't remember the name or having seeds for it.

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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

I don't have any sedges with leaves as wide as that. I have fox sedge, Carex blanda, the palm sedge, and a noID sedge that has a relaxed decumbant growth habit and long leaves. I'm adding a bunch of new sedges this year hopefully

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)


Jeffersonia diphylla in Michigan

Virginia Whitebells in Illinois.

Viola pedata

Lithospermum virginianum


Arisaema triphyllum. Now considered a complex with at least 3 subspecies that I'm aware of.

Polygonatum Polly went native.😁

Temporary shelter

Uvularia puberula, Appalachian bellwort

bathing in banana blooms

that's so fly. Is it a muscid or a blofly?

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Jay 6a Chicago(5b/6a)
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