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Plant ID request please

User
3 years ago
last modified: 3 years ago

Rummage sale rescue. Looks like peat moss media.


Here's a close up.


Any advise too would be greatly appreciated.

I'm a newbie growing these what ever they are.

Should I transplant or start a new piece from a slip?

For 75 cents I can't lose too much if I fail.

TIA :-)

eta: post date: 9-19-2020

Comments (45)

  • s g
    3 years ago

    Schlumbergera or Zygocactus.

    Repot into a less peaty mix, a free draining mix to avoid root rot.

    It is often a good idea to take a cutting or two to start new plants in case you lose the original one for some reason.

    Google the name for tips on growing it.

    User thanked s g
  • Emily (5b)
    3 years ago

    It's a Thanksgiving cactus, Schlumbergera truncata. It blooms around November, hence the name.

    I would repot into a grittier mix, a 1:1 ratio of cactus & succulent soil and rinsed or sifted perlite (or pumice) should work well

    User thanked Emily (5b)
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  • User
    Original Author
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    Turns out, it wasn't a plant at all!

    It was 4 slips, set to root in one pot!

    Only 3 had any roots to any extent and that was only ~1" L. and very few per plant.

    Some of them had aerial roots showing at the joints, they were small, 1/4" or so.

    If they grow in trees, I couldn't think of a better media than 5-1-1 bark mix.

    Here's what I got. Two pots with the best of 3.

    And the last one with roots, for backup? Maybe a gift. :-)
    I watered them down good. I have a fair amount of Calcium and Magnesium in my water.

    Any more tips now that the hard part is finished?

  • User
    Original Author
    3 years ago

    Update:

    I haven't killed the plants, yet and I haven't watered it since the transplant (12 days ago).

    The media is dry on top and I'm not sure how much water it needs or whether the roots have progressed at all. They should have but it's hard to tell. This media dries at the top first and if left long enough will dry towards the bottom so I'm not too worried yet. Can I mist the tops? And should I just water enough to keep things moist?

    With 511 they generally say to water until the water comes out the drain holes, is that different with this plant?


  • cactusmcharris, interior BC Z4/5
    3 years ago

    511 isn't a good mix for jungle cactus (it's too hydrophobic). Misting them is fine.


    User thanked cactusmcharris, interior BC Z4/5
  • User
    Original Author
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    Thanks!

    I just don't know if it's a good time to move this with new roots so tender. I'll just mist occasionally to keep things from getting too dry for now.

    Can this plant send new shoots without much for roots?

    I noticed today some new sprouts on a couple of branches. Possibly a new shoot at the base also.


    eta: post date: 10-4-2020

  • Nicole
    3 years ago

    I have had one since 2016. It does well. I do not water it often. It does sprout little buds ( red or yellow ) but not much and they don't stay too long.

    User thanked Nicole
  • rina_Ontario,Canada 5a
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    Bill

    It looks good, new growth is a good sign. One of mine started to grow flower buds, hope others will follow. I circled few of the buds (there are more, but tiny so far):


    Nicole

    Is it flower buds your plant grows? Do they open? Flowers last for a while on holiday cacti.

    User thanked rina_Ontario,Canada 5a
  • User
    Original Author
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    Thanks all! :-)

    When I was a boy, my Mother had something like this (or it could've been the Christmas cactus, idk) for many years and flowered sometime late in the season (seemed like winter).

    Would it be possibly for this one to flower already this season? I suppose not....

    I am surprised to see it growing so soon after placing little slips in pots but that usually means that the plant likes something about what It's receiving, so I'll try to figure out the watering and go with the bark media for a while.

    I do agree that 511 will be a little hard to keep moist, especially in the top half of the pot, considering the plant doesn't need to be watered all that often.

    The peat tends to collect more heavily in the lower parts of the pot, as time goes on and the moisture level tends to stay ideal longer.

    So I'll have to watch this one, until the root system fills the pot.

    I have forced air heat so humidity really takes a plunge once the heating season begins. :-/

  • rina_Ontario,Canada 5a
    3 years ago

    Christmas cactus blooms around Christmas, Thanksgiving around that holiday. My large TC blooms couple times some years. And there is a Spring or Easter cactus that blooms around Easter...

    Bill

    I do not see any buds on yours, but there are new pads growing. By now, they should start growing (flower buds), or plant will still rest and keep growing new pads and that is good.

    I try not to use any peat at all, that is why I use mostly inorganic mixes for my succulents. And I do not use any bark either since I found it kept the mix moist for too long (and it is hard to get around here). But for CC and some of the TC I have, I use bark - I got some bark for orchids, and it works very well.

    User thanked rina_Ontario,Canada 5a
  • User
    Original Author
    3 years ago

    Okay, Thanks!

    I know also there's a difference in barks, with some types holding moisture better or worse than others.

    I'm a little bit of an experimenter so I'll go with what I have for now and of course that could all change at a moments notice. :-)

    I'll try to keep this thread updated and post up when/as things progress, bad or good.

  • User
    Original Author
    3 years ago

    With Thanksgiving around the corner, here's an update of my Schlumbergera-truncata. The daily misting and weekly watering causing new segment buds to come forth. All have good green color although one has shiny surfaces and some more dull green.

    #1 new shoots at the base.

    #2 Several tiny new segments.

    #3 One new shoot.

    Only one more year and they possibly could bloom? :-)

  • rina_Ontario,Canada 5a
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    No idea if age has anything to do with blooming, I had small cutting to bloom. It was given to me even smaller, this photo is about 6-7 mo after I got it. It bloomed every year since


    User thanked rina_Ontario,Canada 5a
  • User
    Original Author
    3 years ago

    That's incredible!

    I suppose mine, just starting to make roots at end of September wasn't far enough along to bud?

    Until now, I've been watering weekly with just a smidge of MG in the water, barely turns the water a light, light blue.

    Do you think increasing to half of recommended amount of MG would be better? Of course I'm not expecting any buds but thinking it might do better. What do you think?


  • rina_Ontario,Canada 5a
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    That cutting above didn't have roots when given to me either. Actually, I do not fertilize mine. They could get some water with fertilizer in it, but only in summer if I have some left from watering my veggie garden. That doesn't happen often, since I usually have them watered by rain (I keep my plants outside during spring to fall). Maybe 1-2x a season, if. I also use rain water I collect. Do not know if that makes any difference.

    JMO, but I believe "less is more" - so I wouldn't use much more than 1/2 of recommended amount of fert. But that is just MO, and maybe some disagree.

    I think your plant looks great. I have few more, and not all bloomed so fast. I got some CC cuttings and they bloomed first year with me. But they were bigger than your plant, rooted when I got them and came from old plant - maybe that has something to do with it? They had only few blooms first season (I see some buds again). Here is a photo from last year in December:


    and here are cuttings in May, when I got them:

    There are also many "tips" out there as what to do with holiday cacti in order to encourage blooming. I personally do not do anything special for them. Keep them outside during appropriate weather/season, bring them in as it gets cold - same as all my plants. So I can't recommend or otherwise, and wouldn't be bothered to do so. I am sure there are ppl out there that believe in it, and possible some of it works for them. I do not... Here is older TC I have, it was given to me by a neighbour in 2012. It was smaller then, but I am sure few yrs old. It blooms profusely every year:

    Your plant looks very good and healthy. So it maybe just needs time and I am sure it will bloom when ready :)

    User thanked rina_Ontario,Canada 5a
  • User
    Original Author
    3 years ago

    Okay thanks!

    Makes perfect sense to me. :-)


    The bark mix I use is simply that, bark, perlite, dolomite and peat so I'll probably stay with the 'smidge' of MG and only occasionally, so there's not a possible deficiency in nutrients.


    Otherwise, after checking with a tell, watering weekly, at least indoors during winter heating season, seems to be the ticket in keeping the plants happy. And we always set the heat down to 66F before bed time. We sleep better when it's cool in the house and I notice the plants like that too. :-)

    The daily misting has a secondary benefit of keeping the top layers of bark from getting too dry but really, I've never had my 511 get so dry that it's hydrophobic. Maybe it's the type of bark I have? Or maybe I water often enough so it doesn't.


    The table the pots are on is well below the window sill, so no direct sun this time of year but the bright indirect light, reflecting off the white vertical blinds, seems to do it.


    Now after thinking about it, my Mothers plant was Christmas cactus (Schlumbergera bridgesii), I remember what it looked like, even after all these years. She never did anything special either and it grew/bloomed very nice every season.

  • Warahoon Apache
    3 years ago

    It's a kalanchoe or Christmas

  • Warahoon Apache
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    All you need is good draining sandy soil..and let it be ..water maybe every 2-3 week in winter ...a good soak..and that's it. Remember it's a cactus or succulent ..they don't require much water

  • rina_Ontario,Canada 5a
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    Warahoon Apache

    Sorry to disagree...It is not a kalanchoe, and it is not a Christmas cactus. It is a Thanksgiving cactus. Kalanchoe is completely different plant; and there are quite a few different species (about 125...).

    Sand isn't really best for most succulents, unless it is grainy.

    User thanked rina_Ontario,Canada 5a
  • User
    Original Author
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    'Remember it's a cactus or succulent ..they don't require much water'

    That statement cannot be true. To say what one plant needs, simply because it belongs to a group that contains such wide diversity of plants.

    Schlumbergera (sp) originates either side of the Tropic of Capricorn in S.E. Brazil, which is both Tropical to the northern area and subtropical to the southmost area. They are basically 'Jungle plants' where humidity is high and temperature generally range from 70F to 90F. Annual rainfall amounts are 60" to 120". So I don't think they know what it is to be 'dry', comparatively speaking. :-)

    Besides, I never water on a time basis anyways. You have to get to know each kind of plant you're tending to and what it likes and doesn't like. I frequently check media to find out what conditions are and water accordingly. This species of plant doesn't like 'soggy' conditions but leaving it for several weeks without sufficient moisture, in a media that isn't intended to hold water, could mean less than desirable results. imo.

    Anyways, I agree with rina about wrong plant identification you posted. But thanks for your concern. :-)

  • User
    Original Author
    3 years ago

    Just and update:

    2-26-21

    I ditched the larger pot bc that plant didn't seem to be doing as well as the others (rightmost pot). It had rooted nicely and had several long, far reaching roots that went to the bottom of the pot. It also didn't dry out as nice as the other two pots did.

    I also raised the one of the others (middle) that had sank over half way down into the pot but we'll let them go now as I hear they like to be a little on the root bound side.

    I'm giving them more 'window light' each day also and they get misted every time I think of it during the day. :-)

  • User
    Original Author
    3 years ago

    3-16-2021

    Update:

    The 3 TC cutting are developing very well in the 5-1-1 mix.

    Still watering once a week although I think I could wait an extra day or three. It's just that when the plant is doing this good I hate to question it. :^)

    Spring appears to be coming early this year and all the house plants are putting out new growth even though it's not all that nice outside yet.


  • Donna Gore
    3 years ago

    Its a Christmas catus it bloom s flowers at Christmas

    User thanked Donna Gore
  • User
    Original Author
    3 years ago

    Donna,

    Very similar to a Christmas cactus and in the same Genus but this one is called a 'Thanksgiving Cactus' (Schlumbergera truncata). It blooms more in late Fall, closer to Thanksgiving rather than Christmas.


  • jojosplants2020
    3 years ago

    They look great! I have a few I need to get moved into 5-1-1 mix. One plant is confused and getting new buds for it's 3 round of blooms. lol

    User thanked jojosplants2020
  • User
    Original Author
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    3 rounds of blooms! What do you feed that thing? :-o

  • jojosplants2020
    3 years ago

    LOL! @User

    It's had 1 feeding of fish emulsion since Oct.! That's it.

    It's either really confused or grateful I rescued it from the Lowes clearance rack. lol

    User thanked jojosplants2020
  • User
    Original Author
    2 years ago

    Moved the Schlumbergera Truncata to inside the house today. Couldn't find a reliable source to find just how cold they can take?

    We're starting to get low to mid 50's F. at night so didn't want to take a chance.

    It's been a drought season and these got watered every few days. I tried to limit the sun exposure but some days I'd forget and they'd get a few to several hours of direct sun for a day or two. Didn't seem to hurt them but they did loose the deep green color they had before I put them out.

    Soaking rains the last couple of weeks.

    Very weak fert mixture a few times and did put a little MgSO4 in the water a few times this summer.

    Lots of new growth and healthy looking over all. Now will they bloom this time around? ;-)


  • User
    Original Author
    2 years ago
    last modified: 2 years ago

    10-16-21


    Here come the buds. Thinking flower buds? :-)


  • Tiffany, purpleinopp Z8b Opp, AL
    2 years ago

    If they're round, not flat, they're buds. Might take a few more days to know for sure.

    User thanked Tiffany, purpleinopp Z8b Opp, AL
  • rina_Ontario,Canada 5a
    2 years ago

    Bill it does look like buds to me...we already had Thanksgiving here in Canada, and my TC is confused - will bloom closer to Christmas or maybe US Thanksgiving

    User thanked rina_Ontario,Canada 5a
  • User
    Original Author
    2 years ago
    last modified: 2 years ago

    It has begun!

    Must be this plant blooms over a period of time just looking at how the buds form erratically?


    Full view:


    Window side:


  • Jurassic Park
    2 years ago
    last modified: 2 years ago

    I collect xerophytic cacti (those from arid regions), but I love all the tropical and cold hardy cacti best.



    Schumbegera truncata (Thanksgiving cactus)




    Eastern Prickly Pear (Opunria humifusa)

    User thanked Jurassic Park
  • rina_Ontario,Canada 5a
    2 years ago

    Bill

    Leaving it in cooler conditions will encourage blooming. Just like jades (& some other plants), holiday cacti will bud after some shorter days (naturally, in the fall - I don't use any other tricks recommended on some sites like keeping it in a darkcloset, lol) & cooler temps. I left one of mine smaller/younger plants in a breezway (unheated; lowest temps so far were abt. 7*C), & it is full of buds now. Plants inside, where it is warmer & more light, are far behind.


    User thanked rina_Ontario,Canada 5a
  • User
    Original Author
    2 years ago

    That's good to know rina.

    Our days are getting short, more cloudy and quite a bit colder.

    One question, why are my blooms 'Pink' and Margaritaville's are so 'Red' in color?


  • rina_Ontario,Canada 5a
    2 years ago

    Bill;

    Because holiday cacti come in many colors: including red, rose, purple, lavender, peach, orange, cream, and white. Pink seems to be most common.

    User thanked rina_Ontario,Canada 5a
  • Jurassic Park
    2 years ago
    last modified: 2 years ago

    Bill, right after the holidays, these big box stores discount all their holiday plants that most people probably buy for temporary decoration and then throw out. But I can't resist saving them, so I will look for different colors; red, pink, magenta, white. They are really easy. I also keep an eye out for evergreens that they seem to sell as temporary decorations and are ready to give away after the holidays. (I've purchased nice sized laurels, holly bushes, Osmanthus, etc. that end up in the yard..) Regarding the holiday cacti, I hang mine in a strand of Eastern Hemlocks along with other epiphytes (ferns, bromeliads, etc). I leave them out from April through October and this year, they would have sailed through November so far. BTW, if you do leave them out, I learned two years ago can they are readily eaten by DEER, so, I started hanging them higher in the trees, LOL. I did put them recently into my garage/greenhouse (and we get a lot of winter sun). All are covered in buds. Not sure if it's the cooler temps for longer nights, or both, but it always works.

    User thanked Jurassic Park
  • User
    Original Author
    2 years ago

    The flowers open up a lot bigger than I thought. Are all the different colors the same?

    This is one single bloom.

    Underside of same single bloom.


  • User
    Original Author
    2 years ago

    Bill said 'Are all the different colors the same?'

    Let me rephrase that question.

    Besides color, are there varieties of the blossoms also?

  • User
    Original Author
    2 years ago

    Well, I learned a new word 'zygomorphic'. ;-)

    Which could cause the blooms to appear different at various stages of blooming.

  • rina_Ontario,Canada 5a
    2 years ago
    last modified: 2 years ago

    Bill

    I don't have any 'fancy' ones, but hybridizing produces many colors. Also shape of the blooms. I really like the Chiba Spot for the different shape:


    Have a look thru here for some different hybrids (check them all): https://cactus-epiphytes.eu/z_galerie_2010_zygocactus_schlumbergera.htm

    There is also another thread running: https://www.houzz.com/discussions/6199025/what-are-your-favorite-christmas-cactus-schlumbergera#n=10

    User thanked rina_Ontario,Canada 5a
  • User
    Original Author
    2 years ago

    Ah, thanks!

    I'll check them out. :)

  • BillMN-z-2-3-4
    last year

    9-22-2022

    Just an update:

    After spending the summer outdoors (under that plant table), our nights are getting pretty cold. So I brought the Schlumbergera Truncata in. I'm keeping a couple for my DIL until they get their new house built next spring.

    I actually had a couple of blooms pop up over the winter months, a month apart from each other. I think March was the last bloom. Anyways, I haven't decided which one to keep but I like the one that has a stout, woody trunk at the bottom. :-)

  • BillMN-z-2-3-4
    last year

    I just wanted to add/share;


    Last Fall & Winter I was watering once a week. For a while this worked well, but after a while (a month?), the 511 mix did tend to get very dry. So, watering once a week, became once every day or two.

    It then occurred to me, if these plants grow where 200" of rain annually is the norm, then rehydrating the 511-bark mix shouldn't be a problem.


    So, what I did was, put the pots in a container and bottom watered.

    I'd fill the container until the water was almost level to the tops of the pots and let them soak from 2-3 hours, could be longer. This re-hydrated the bark mix and after that, I could water normally, once a week again, for the next couple of weeks, until the bark dried out again.


    The plants actually seemed to like this method and I got great flowering with several flowers popping up all winter. (no, I can't explain it but 200" annually means pretty wet) :-)


    11-16-2021;


    December 5-2021


    February 27th, 2022:

    April 2-2022:

    June 5 2022:


    :^)