55% of coronavirus patients still have neurological problems three mon

palisades_

By

Nicole Lyn Pesce

30

Mounting evidence suggests COVID-19 could cause brain damage in adults and kids

Could the coronavirus lead to chronic illness?

While lung scarring, heart and kidney damage may result from COVID-19, doctors and researchers are starting to clock the potential long-term impact of the virus on the brain also.

Younger COVID-19 patients who were otherwise healthy are suffering blood clots and strokes.

And many “long-haulers,” or COVID-19 patients who have continued showing symptoms for months after the initial infection passed, report neurological problems such as confusion and difficulty concentrating (or brain fog), as well as headaches, extreme fatigue, mood changes, insomnia and loss of taste and/or smell.

Indeed, the CDC recently warned that it takes longer to recover from COVID-19 than the 10- to 14-day quarantine window that has been touted throughout the pandemic. In fact, one in five young adults under 34 was not back to their usual health up to three weeks after testing positive. And 35% of surveyed U.S. adults overall had not returned to their normal state of health when interviewed two to three weeks after testing.

Now a study of 60 COVID-19 patients published in Lancet this weekfinds that 55% of them were still displaying such neurological symptoms during follow-up visits three months later. And when doctors compared brain scans of these 60 COVID patients with those of a control group who had not been infected, they found that the brains of the COVID patients showed structural changes that correlated with memory loss and smell loss.

.............

the rest of the article,

https://www.marketwatch.com/story/55-of-coronavirus-patients-still-have-neurological-problems-three-months-later-study-2020-08-07?mod=home-page


Never let your guards down!

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Comments (24)
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maifleur03

I have thought since the virus started making news that doctors and news articles should be more truthful about the condition of people who have "recovered" from the virus. I do not know if they purposefully choose people to interview who either have few remaining problems or the people chosen simply lie because they do not want people to know they are still having problems. Even when the news was only mentioning pneumonia I knew there would be long term health problems. I had the interstitial type pneumonia and still have problems with breathing and chest pains and this is more than 25 years later.

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Annie Deighnaugh

Scary stuff. Does this mean the same side effects could be triggered by a vaccine? I guess time will tell.

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mr1010

I agree that there's too little emphasis on long term changes in the body.

Doctors, patients and the media need to stress this more so the public doesn't dismiss this as just the flu. they've been saying this all along but not enough emphasis.

Just as in horses, some viruses do affect them long after the virus symptoms

have lifted, but the neurological problems may never go away.

And a warning here- many neurological problems get worse as the patient ages.

So after Covid, your body may never be the same.

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ronminsouthga

Lancet? Really The Lancet retracts Hydroxychloroquine study.

https://www.webmd.com/lung/news/20200605/lancet-retracts-hydroxychloroquine-study

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queenmargo

Scary stuff. Does this mean the same side effects could be triggered by a vaccine? I guess time will tell.

So, if a vaccine comes out, will you take it? Or will you let "others" be the trial rats?

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adoptedbyhounds

I would like to know what treatments were provided to each of the patients while they were in the hospital.

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deegw

I would like to know what treatments were provided to each of the patients while they were in the hospital.

----------------

Follow the links in the article.

Here is the first study from the article.

https://www.thelancet.com/journals/eclinm/article/PIIS2589-5370(20)30228-5/fulltext

Control F the word "treatment".

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Iris GW

But let's send the kids back to school!

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nancy_in_venice_ca Sunset 24 z10

When a new virus appears, new scary stuff is discovered.

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adoptedbyhounds

Control F the word "treatment".

Thanks, but I have no idea what that means.

What drugs, if any, were patients given?


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maifleur03

adopted on all computers since at least there is a key that is labeled Ctrl. It used to be spelled in full as Control. By pressing it and other keys depending on what you want to do you are using the shortcuts that have been built in since DOS was the main computer language.

However you may need a translator between British English and American English for the names of the drugs. Paracetamol in England is called Tylenol in the US. Other drugs are also named differently.

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maifleur03

I found it interesting that previous studies have mentioned changes in the brain but this one actually mentions changes happening in the right side of the brain in both right and left handed people.

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deegw


adoptedbyhounds

Control F the word "treatment".

Thanks, but I have no idea what that means.

What drugs, if any, were patients given?

----------------------

Choose your favorite search engine.

Enter the key words "what is control f".

You can use the control f shortcut to find the words "treatment" or "drugs" in each study linked in the original article.

Or you can read each study. YMMV

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adoptedbyhounds

"adopted on all computers since at least there is a key that is labeled
Ctrl. It used to be spelled in full as Control. By pressing it and other
keys depending on what you want to do you are using the shortcuts that
have been built in since DOS was the main computer language."

Thanks maifleur. I had already used the "find in this page" feature, thinking that if I put in "treatment" I would be able to learn about the treatments given to patients. I thought it would be worth knowing if the patients who had the long lasting problems had been treated with Hydroxychloroquine, but neither that term, nor zinc nor drugs came up. The only treatment information I could find listed oxygen therapy, interferon, unnamed antibiotics, unnamed antiviral(s) and hormone therapy.

It would be interesting to know if people who were treated with Hydroxychloroquine experienced more or fewer of the long term effects found in the study.

Thanks again for the shortcut tip.

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adoptedbyhounds

Hi Deegw, Just posted my thanks to maifleur, and now I see that you also stepped in to help. I appreciate that very much. I looked up YMMV... were you saying "Your mileage may vary?"

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maifleur03

Things have changed but most studies while they may list the medicines that are used they are more likely to group them together. The reasoning is that by naming one medication it can help identify a patient especially if the patient or their family knows which medication was given.

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adoptedbyhounds

"Things have changed but most studies while they may list the medicines
that are used they are more likely to group them together."

In what kind of study would that make sense? If the goal is to measure patient outcomes for a specific drug or drug combination, how can measuring "groups" of drugs possibly be valid?

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Ziemia(6a)

As in - regardless of treatment, many patients experience long-term neurological negative outcomes.

And, there's this early finding ("early" means it's been done early in our experience with Covid-19 - not after many months of experience):

"The high incidence of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, particularly with haemorrhagic change, is striking. This complication was not related to the severity of the respiratory COVID-19 disease. "

https://academic.oup.com/brain/advance-article/doi/10.1093/brain/awaa240/5868408

(One of the studies mentioned in the OP article.)

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maifleur03

A study that lists actual medication could be subject to lawsuits from people who see a medication on a report and either insist on having it or find it from a friend of a friend whose doctor thought it might work but then switched to another medication. Then after taking it develop health problems which may not even be related to the medication. However it has to be the medication. Or the old "After all it was listed in a report as being used in a study" Of course being listed does not mean it was affective but there are always some people who think that way.

I do hope that you understand that this article is an abstract of the actual report.

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palisades_

In one of the studies linked in the article, “The emerging spectrum of COVID-19 neurology” mentioned patients being treated with iv methylprenisolone, a steroid. It made sense to use steroids to counter inflammatory response but evidently the drug could not cross blood brain barrier to reduce the inflammation in the brain! The article mentioned fragment of the virus was found in the brain, causing inflammatory reactions there, then potentially causing neurological damage in the brain. So it’s better to detect Covid infection early and treat soon as possible before the viral genetic material gets inside the brain.

Patients who have chronic inflammations (diabetes, HF, high cholesterol...) would have worse outcomes neurologically than those healthier patients.

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palisades_

.....depending on what you want to do you are using the shortcuts that have been built in since DOS was the main computer language.

Mentioning of DOS brought back memory. I used to write batch programs on the IBM PC in those days.

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maifleur03

Very few any more know that the shortcut keys originated in DOS. At that time early 80s where I was located we were forbidden for whatever reason to use them. While I know that they are there and occasionally use ctrl P that is about it. They are very handy for lots of things if you take the time to learn about them.

Several of the things I have read in British newspapers mention the possibility that the virus enters the nasal passages and immediately transmits to the brain. Then the brain sends signals destroying various body parts. If this is true other than perhaps insertion of something directly into the brain in the area of original infection there will be another disease which you fight the symptoms and do not cure the disease. I am hoping not.

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palisades_

I have not seen any studies that say Covid would enter the brain immediately via nasal passages entry port. Human T cells would mount a first fight as soon as they detect a foreign pathogen in the nasal passages. Although by breathing mechanism, some virus can quickly pass from the nasal passages into the lungs where they can quickly multiply in that favorable environment, then they will spread out to blood (to brain) and other the parts of the body.

For most viral infections, there are no cures. Often it’s up to the body to clear the virus. But thanks to advances in drug development, Hep-C is now curable.

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adoptedbyhounds

"I do hope that you understand that this article is an abstract of the actual report."

Not questioning the report. That report was for a prospective study designed "to identify the existence of potential brain micro-structural changes related to SARS-CoV-2." That's what it measured.

I'm questioning your claim that "...most studies while they may list the medicines that are used they are more likely to group them together." I have no idea what kind of study are you referring to or where that claim came from, and you've provided no source.

Hydroxychloroqine has been the subject of multiple studies, some posted here.

No source either for this claim:

"...a study that lists actual medication could be subject to lawsuits from people who see a medication on a report and either insist on having it or find it from a friend of a friend whose doctor thought it might work but then switched to another medication. Then after taking it develop health problems which may not even be related to the medication.

However it has to be the medication. Or the old "After all it was listed in a
report as being used in a study" Of course being listed does not mean it
was affective but there are always some people who think that way."

What you describe is not a study at all. It's not measuring anything.

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