Things are going great with covid and school-age kids!

deegw



I lived in Georgia for years and raised my kids there. I would bet that every upper-middle-class kid in Georgia either goes to High Harbor or knows someone who goes there.

SaveComment100Like
Comments (100)
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
deegw


1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
deegw


1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
deegw


Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b(zone 9/10)

Someone pointed out that if we really want kids to return to in-person school, it's our responsibility as adults to make sure it's safe, by following guidelines and reducing spread.

And how's that been going?

15 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Joaniepoanie

They must have all been rioting.

22 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Toby

On the first day of school at an Indiana junior high, they had a positive student.

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Nana H

Barron's private school is opening for online learning only.

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
HamiltonGardener

The Ontario government used the advice from the Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) in Toronto, who worked with their experts as well as some outside medical experts to give guidelines on how to safely open schools.


I think each state has a preeminent children’s hospital and plenty of university hospitals to also make the plan for reopening their own state.




2 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
socks(10a)

Every time we try to open, it fails. One step forward, two back. We are slow to learn the virus is rampant in our country. Why would any of these efforts work? Nothing has changed.

6 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Iris GW

I agree with carol, adults have to behave better if they want to send their kids back to in-person learning.

4 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
deegw


1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
studio10001

Oh, man, if this is how we finally get them to quarantine, send every one of their kids back to school. I am finally in on this.

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
linaria_gw(zone 7 (about))

I just like this guy and his views


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QXt6XzjwBUI 

(dang, the youtube-link-feature is iffy again, seems to be a device issue)

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
olliesmom

Nana, so?

I know plenty of kids that have had Covid, and all of them are asymptomatic. All these kids were in process of going to camps, and had to be tested first.


Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Ziemia(6a)

No adults at these camps?

2 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Nana H

Olliesmom, why are you addressing your comment to me?

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
maifleur03

Olliesmom you bring up something that I have been wondering about. All the asymptomatic people who have been two months or longer from the initial infection. There have been enough second infections so that doctors are aware that it happens and from comments on here the second infection is worse. If these children had the virus earlier and it was undetected or only a mild case the second round will be much worse.

I remember going to camp and perhaps the buses now used have bathrooms there was always at least one stop on the way to the camp. Camps also tended to only check the health of the counselors and not the other people who actually make the camps run.

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
olliesmom

Nana, So? What is the big deal about Baron's school going online?

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Ziemia(6a)

whoosh

5 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Nana H

Not a big deal to me.......but Daddy might mind.

3 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
olliesmom

I have never heard of any proof of second infections. I also think there are a lot of false negatives, and I don't think all the tests are accurate. I use to think they were. I have adult friends on a trip that did antibody tests, one showed they had it, and the others did not. If it was that contagious, in close quarters, and they all drank from the same drink even and one point, they all should have gotten it. Doesn't make sense. One teenager I know, kisses boyfriend, while she was positive, he never got it.

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
olliesmom

Nana, I was hoping you would elaborate, as we all know that his school is online. You expect him to use his power to keep his son's school open? I have no power over my son's school. It is a good school, it will open, but who knows for how long, so we are willing to wait this out.

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Nana H

If you didn't get my point let's just leave it at that. No energy or desire to explain and no , I don't think he will try and use his powers , Barron is Mommy's business.

7 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Iris GW

and they all drank from the same drink even [at] one point

Who does that?!!?

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
maifleur03

I am old enough to know of several people whose parents took them to those parties so all of the children would have various diseases at the same time. Not all of them even had the various diseases. Some developed them immediately. Some had to attend several so the idea that just because people drank out of the same beverage just makes me shake my head. I do wonder what was in that beverage that would cause an infection.

One of the posters on here had someone in their family have the virus twice. snead??? perhaps. The second time was worse. Keep reading and you will see doctors reporting the second infections. I had the long form measles twice separated by years. If the antibodies fade from the body it is like a person has never had the disease. How hard is that to understand???

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
HamiltonGardener

If the antibodies fade from the body it is like a person has never had the disease. How hard is that to understand???


That’s not true maifleur.

2 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
maifleur03

Just wait HG and read.

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
texanjana(8)

My doctor has several patients who had Covid in February and March. Only those who contracted it in Italy still show immunity through blood testing. None of the others do.

BTW, my dad had shingles twice and my daughter had chicken pox twice. Both viral illnesses, though their second cases were milder than the first.

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Ziemia(6a)

How vigorous is Trump in arguing with Baron's school that it open this fall with in-person learning?

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
maifleur03

If many were infected and were asymptomatic in March through May and lost their antibodies and develop it a second time what the hospitals will be seeing are many more really sick people within the next couple of weeks. I am hoping I am wrong but only time will tell.

Question that I do have that I have read nothing on it. Are the people that are developing it now developing a stronger version or are the bodies of those who have been infected previously never really recovered?

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
George Davis

The problem is we have too much information because we're all making noise. Unless we set up a system that allow us to understand and track the effects of this virus many of us are just the walking dead. Just think on If what ya'll are saying is the diseases . May strike in ten days or up to two months. It causes people to have the need to be sociable which helps the spread. But if a child gets it but only spreads it a little then it goes away but come this winter when the temp drops it will come back and hit children harder than the adults. Hey, just some more noise to add to the rest.

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
studio10001

I don't know about the intensity with kids in general, but our town just buried a 9 yr old - asymptomatic up to her last 6 days of life, and no pre existing conditions. School starts in 10 days.

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b(zone 9/10)

AFAIK, most recent data shows the virus is mainly transmitted through airborne particles in a person's breath that are inhaled deep into other's lungs at a high enough rate to create an infection.

So sharing a drink would not necessarily transmit it very well.

The main thing to be concerned about is how many breaths you share with others. This is why masks help reduce the spread.

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
socks(10a)

Keep Baron safe but send our kids out as guinea pigs????

4 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Joaniepoanie

Baron’s school is private so they can set their own policies re opening. The county where his school resides has decided on virtual learning for all public schools for the first semester, which ends at the end of January. The NIH main campus is also located there and those that are working from home will continue to do so until at least the end of the year.

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
daisychain01

Olliesmom, althou I do worry about the children themselves, the fact that most remain asymptotic is not comforting to those who interact with them on a daily basis. I have been caring for my Elderly parents during summer break. Once I go back to the classroom, I will have to turn care for one parent over to strangers and the care for the other over to a brother with mental health issues. DH and I are 55 so I have serious concerns about our health should I bring home the virus to either of us. When you suggest that it is no big deal because the kids getting it in school are asympomatic it makes me feel like you are also suggesting it is no big deal if my DH and I get sick and quite possibly die. I guess if you are sitting in a glass castle on hill unaffected personally by these issues, perspectives can vary.

15 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b(zone 9/10)

Exactly daisychain! I find it frustrating and disturbing how very few, if any, arguments for reopening schools seem to consider the safety and health of the adults who will be working with the kids.

5 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Uptown Gal

or the health of their parents, Grandmas, Grandpas Aunts,Uncles etc., when they bring it home

to the families?

5 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
studio10001

I wasn't being facetious above - if schools all require testing to return, communities stand a far better chance of finding out where quarantines are needed than we are determining now, and that can help protect whole families. A two week quarantine at the beginning of the school year is exactly what is needed, imo, not only to make the schools accessible, but parents accountable: an estimated 50% of vectors do not present symptoms, and consequently don't test. If Johnny can't start school until the family tests negative, that won't impact his learning for the semester greatly, but it could have a good effect on community spread. Off to see if my county is requiring this.

ETA no plan has been approved as yet by the state, but the county is offering 3 choices for fall, only one of which involves classroom time. 40% of families want their kids to return, and tranportation workers are already complaining about current exposures to positive co workers on the job that the county has not notified them of. Testing is not being discussed, either. :(

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
olliesmom

daisychain, then teachers need to find a new profession. Because it's not going completely away anytime soon. So many people aren't even going to take the vaccine. Many teachers will be out of jobs, it just the way of the future now. Our kids will be getting their education online-and many will like it better-especially the non-social kids. The rest of us will have to go the private route, which I, personally would like better for my son anyway-he only has two more years to go. Private schools around here are busting at the seams now-students are on waiting lists-since public school are going virtual-found out yesterday.

I personally think, the younger more healthy teachers should teach for in-school learning and the older, more compromised, should do the virtual part of the school population.

eta: Funny to me, we see many teachers out and about at Walmart, Target, Home Depot, etc. but the teachers don't seem to care about those workers that come into contact with just as many people as students. And..students would have their temps taken twice a day, wearing masks, and the teachers behind a plexiglass.

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
miss lindsey (She/Her)(8a)

olliesmom you’re very fortunate if you live in an area with a glut of teachers.

In my region we can barely find spares.

Telling a 50 year old teacher to “find a new profession” because they are concerned about the risk of a lethal pathogen is laughably cliched. Did you just re-read the “how to be conservative” guidebook or something?!

ROFL

11 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Ziemia(6a)

"not going away soon".

Duh

However, there is knowing its presence can be curtailed (or expanded) through behavior.

13 deaths (maybe) yesterday in Australia. 73 so far today in Florida.

5 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
lionheart_gw (USDA Zone 5A, Eastern NY)

In NYS, it appears that we will be opening schools. All school districts must submit their re-opening plans to the state's education department.

"On Monday, July 13, 2020, Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced that school districts in New York can establish plans to reopen for in-person schooling in September if COVID-19 infection rates stay at 5% or lower in a given region. Additionally, he said determinations will be made by region about opening and closing schools as the COVID-19 pandemic continues. If a region is in Phase 4 and has a daily infection rate of 5% or lower over a 14-day average, schools in that region could hold in-person instruction. If daily infection rates exceed 9% over a seven-day average, however, schools in that region would not reopen."

Cuomo also said he would close schools again if infection rates start to rise.

Of course, all parents have the option of staying with "all virtual" instruction.

If The Olds, like me, are worried, they should stay home and isolate from others. For lower risk groups, it's a cost/benefit analysis. The costs of staying in a bunker are high for young people, and the benefits diminish as the length of time increases.

Hopefully a vaccine will become available and set us free again.

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
olliesmom

Ziemia, Whoosh!

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
studio10001

Is anyone hearing anything about older teachers being give the option to take over online instruction? Here, teachers are being asked to handle their classrooms both in person and online. Regardless of age, that is a pretty unhappy scenario.

4 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Ziemia(6a)

And, sure, all students are willing to stay calm and keep that mask on and wash hands for 20 seconds. And none will have a bad day where they refuse the mask and do a fake cough all around. /s

So, masking is an incomplete solution.

And,.social distancing during a fire drill? Or a lockdown drill?

The less than 5% (community infection rate) guidelines work as long as testing rates are high, with quick results.

3 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
HamiltonGardener

Many teachers will be out of jobs, it just the way of the future now. Our kids will be getting their education online-and many will like it better-especially the non-social kids. The rest of us will have to go the private route,


Olliesmom, I think you are correct in that assessment. My daughter in law sells learning software to schools and things are being greatly expanded. She believes that many school districts are going to move to more online learning because kids are getting comfortable with it and pay more attention to the computer than to their teacher.

I think they’ll do it because they can save money by reducing teaching staff and consolidating schools. Those who want in school teaching will have to take their kids to private schools.

Most of her clients are US private schools but of course during this pandemic, public schools have placed orders for specialized learning software. They have developed a number of self directed learning packages for different grades and different school boards.

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
daisychain01

Yes, I guess I could find another job but that would likely mean I couldn’t afford to keep my home or put my kids through school. Here teachers are considered professionals and earn a good salary with benefits. Ive been working for many years and feel I’m at the height of my professional life so they’d be losing a good teacher and mentor for younger teachers. I guess I feel it would be good to look at other solutions rather than tossing people who’ve worked their entire lives to contribute to society and make a success of their lives. I guess when people find my entire life, things I’ve worked hard for , the people I love expendable so that they can have a choice of 5 brands rather than one or two, it makes me not just sad and angry but desperate. It might make me feel better if you explained what youll be sacrificing while I contemplate my Sophie’s choice of life or livelihood.

14 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Iris GW

https://www.cnn.com/2020/08/03/us/gwinnett-schools-covid-employees/index.html

Georgia's largest school district has confirmed that around 260 employees have either tested positive for Covid-19 or have been exposed.

GCSD already had pushed the start date back to August 12, but had given the option for in-person learning until late July when the decision to only provide virtual learning was "due to the current Covid-19 situation in our county and the rising numbers of cases in Gwinnett County," Roach explained.

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
isabellagracepan

I am a high school teacher, and I just think that it warrants a mention that in my experience, students certainly do NOT pay more attention to learning software than to a live teacher! I taught at a private university preparatory school, and most instructors used the classic "teacher and chalk" method of teaching. If you are a great teacher you don't need anything else to teach.

I tried several experiments with online science labs, and in the end the students always learned more from hands on work. There is something about extracting DNA in person that cannot be replicated by clicking a mouse!

I understand that during these times of coronavirus, we will have to make do with online learning, but I certainly hope that will not be the way of the future.

And, to anyone saying that teachers need to find a new job, who do you suggest will fill their empty places? Security guards? Cashiers? You?

11 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
loonlakelaborcamp(3 A/B)

For all you who don't want children yo go back to school, do you really think their families are going to keep them totally isolatef at home?


No outside of home family visits? No hanging with any friends? No church? No protesting? No movie theatres? No playgrounds or pools? No holiday get togethers. No contact with anyone?


Kids and family will get exposed just about anywhere. Masks, washing, distancing is the only thing we can do until a vaccine is made.

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Iris GW

The family of an Indiana student who learned of apositive Covid-19 test on the first day of school sent the child to classes knowing the result of the test was pending, the school superintendent said Monday.

That's why I wouldn't want my kid in school because parents can be stupid and you can't control for that.

https://www.cnn.com/2020/08/03/us/indiana-student-covid-positive-school/index.html

6 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
maifleur03

Wondering how many are aware that in some states if you are a teacher you pay into an completely different retirement system. You may not be eligible to receive Social Security even spousal SS. If you work at a second or post teaching job your pension is offset/reduced by any other pension that you may receive. Someone who started teaching 20-30 years ago did not start out at the higher salaries that are now seen. Those who are telling teachers of any age that they can just stop teaching and get an entry level job are discounting the financial aspects of being older with less income. Not certain if a return to the good old days of yester year when teachers were some of the poorest retirees is a good thing.

3 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b(zone 9/10)

Seems like the old 'let 'em eat cake' attitude of those who are confident that they will never have to face such terrible choices.

Stone cold heartlessness

8 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
bfox254

Loonlake, you're (unintentionally, I think) making the case for online schooling. If that child whose parents don't enforce social distancing goes to school with his classmates, he potentially infects other students, teachers etc. If eveyone's at home, he only infects those around him.

4 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
loonlakelaborcamp(3 A/B)

Kudos to you, Barbara. You are doing things properly. Unfortunately, that is not what I am observing with my extended family.


Bfox254, I am all for online learning, however our teacher's unions have been bad-mouthing "home schooling" for so long that they are getting whiplash now that they are advocating online learning to protect the teachers. Personally, I have two former teacher friends who would gladly go back to teaching if was online-both were injured by unruly students.

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
daisychain01

Loonlake, as I’ve stated in previous threads, I am absolutely not against kids going back to school. I am desperate to get back to the classroom. Teaching online was much more work and way less enjoyable. I also have school age kids that I want back in class. I just want it done safely.

3 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
studio10001

For what it is worth, Dr. B is now recommending that those with multigenerational homes should wear masks inside.

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
catspa_zone9sunset14

I tried several experiments with online science labs, and in the end the students always learned more from hands on work. There is something about extracting DNA in person that cannot be replicated by clicking a mouse!

Tried those software lab modules with my biology students, too. Dreadful. Mainly click busywork at a frenetic pace and, worst of all, none of the educational content seemed to make its way into my students' brains - none -- kids seemed too busy and distracted trying to figure out where or what to click next rather than paying any attention to the content. Self-directed learning may work in some subjects with self-directed students. "Some subjects" does not include science labs and the large majority of students are not self-directed anyway....

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
HamiltonGardener

In Ontario, yes.

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Iris GW

I certainly would be doing that. Much better than the effects of covid-19 (known and unknown).

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
HamiltonGardener

Well, it will be interesting to see how many send their kids back to school in September.

But, to tie it into Daisy’s comment above ...

Yes, I guess I could find another job but that would likely mean I couldn’t afford to keep my home or put my kids through school.

Many of them want to send their kids back to school because they, too, need to get back to work so they don’t lose their homes and need to put their kids through school. They don’t have the advantage of protected jobs, paycheques, benefits, pensions, etc and they are going back to work and facing the same risks as the rest of the people out there.

Everyone will have to make the choice.

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
catspa_zone9sunset14

If education were simply childcare, HamiltonGardener, you wouldn't need to pay for teachers at all. You could just hire some teenagers for minimum wage...The childcare angle is something parents need to figure out, not the teachers, because that is not the teachers' job -- it's part of what people take on when they decide to be parents.

6 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
HamiltonGardener

I am a high school teacher, and I just think that it warrants a mention that in my experience, students certainly do NOT pay more attention to learning software than to a live teacher!


Just to clarify, their software largely targets elementary schools and kids do focus more on computers than on a teacher. The software is often game-like, and the reading, writing, and math software is very successful and has been for years. Think Sesame Street and the success with literacy in young children.


I taught at a private university preparatory school,


I think that is a much different learning experience than most kids get. Probably much better than the classroom instruction that happens today.

Not to mention how difficult it is for kids to learn when dealing with issues like bullying at school.


and most instructors used the classic "teacher and chalk" method of teaching. If you are a great teacher you don't need anything else to teach.


I fully believe that the best learning experience is in class. However, I also acknowledge that with the right support software, the experience can be just as good or even better in some school circumstances. Different subjects or grade levels need more teacher involvement than others.


But don’t underestimate the effect this will have on how schools deliver education in the future. The longer this goes on, the more the technology will be developed to have kids self-directed, and the less need school boards will find for the teachers.

Colleges are already delivering online courses. High schools are exploring the same. I know this because school boards are working with my daughter in law’s company to develop courses. And the elementary software has been around for a while, it just needs to be expanded to encompass more of the curriculum.

Amd as usual, kids that go to private school will get the best education (in class) while the rest of the kids get “good enough”.

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
HamiltonGardener

The childcare angle is something parents need to figure out, not the teachers, because that is not the teachers' job


That is the same thing my aunt has been saying for years. (She’s a teacher)


But let’s face it, if parents had to take care of that themselves, they might as well teach the kids too.

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Iris GW

This was such a hot topic for Ann earlier; yet she seems to be carefully avoiding any comments here ....

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Iris GW

Childcare itself is a topic that is of big concern to many parents; not sure there are good solutions.

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Iris GW

Future Georgia cases right here ....


1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
ubro(2a)

Our Provincial Govt. just served up a doozy of a plan, business as usual, no social distancing, no smaller class sizes, no masks but hey! Hand sanitizer for all.

Bussing requirements are two fold, kids from the same family sit together and the bus is cleaned after each run, big deal. You cannot get onto a plane without a mask but kids, in our Sask. weather unable to open the windows will be in close quarters for long periods of time without masks.

In other words we have no plan at all, except more hand sanitizer. Sheesh what a moron Scott Moe is. We have multiple good plans set out by other provinces and our leader takes the no plan approach.

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
deegw

When Covid Subsided, Israel Reopened Its Schools. It Didn’t Go Well.

-----------

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/08/04/world/middleeast/coronavirus-israel-schools-reopen.html?searchResultPosition=16


Confident it had beaten the coronavirus and desperate to reboot a devastated economy, the Israeli government invited the entire student body back in late May.

Within days, infections were reported at a Jerusalem high school, which quickly mushroomed into the largest outbreak in a single school in Israel, possibly the world.

The virus rippled out to the students’ homes and then to other schools and neighborhoods, ultimately infecting hundreds of students, teachers and relatives.

Other outbreaks forced hundreds of schools to close. Across the country, tens of thousands of students and teachers were quarantined.

Israel’s advice for other countries?

They definitely should not do what we have done,” said Eli Waxman, a professor at the Weizmann Institute of Science and chairman of the team advising Israel’s National Security Council on the pandemic. “It was a major failure.”

The United States is facing similar pressures to fully reopen schools, and President Trump has threatened to withhold funding for districts that don’t reopen. But the U.S. is in a far worse position than Israel was in May: Israel had fewer than 100 new infections a day then. The U.S. is now averaging more than 60,000 new cases a day, and some states continue to set alarming records.

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
deegw

From the NYT comments section.

“It became the largest outbreak in a single school in Israel, possibly the world.”

Don’t say that. Because USA will be like “challenge accepted. Hold my beer”
We like being number 1. Always.

5 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b(zone 9/10)

Everybody I talk with IRL is dumfounded and furious about how our GOP 'leaders' are refusing to effectively deal with this plague.

2 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b(zone 9/10)

Maybe ubro should send that NYT article to local authorities? My governor should read it, for sure.

So frustrating! That article is very disturbing.

And this:

"....A nursery school teacher, Shalva Zalfreund, 64, sent anote to parents saying she believed she had been infected in her school, where some parents had sent their children from homes with cases of the virus. She died in July...."

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Mrs Pete

I am old enough to know of several people whose parents took them to those parties so all of the children would have various diseases at the same time.

I don't really remember "parties", but I know that when I brought Chicken Pox home from school, my mother did nothing to separate me from my four younger siblings, accepting that they'd need to catch it sometimes -- might as well be now. However, several things were different about that situation:

- We had no Chicken Pox vaccine, so it was accepted that those younger siblings would get it sometime.

- Chicken Pox can't be caught a second time (usually), so it was considered smart to "get it out of the way". Corona Virus, in contrast, can be caught a second time, so no one can really "get it out of the way".

The second time was worse.

Is Corona Virus always worse a second time, or was this just what happened to one individual?

Private schools around here are busting at the seams now-students are on waiting lists-since public school are going virtual-found out yesterday.

Same thing here. I don't think it's going to go as well as they hope. She believes that many school districts are going to move to more online learning because kids are getting comfortable with it and pay more attention to the computer than to their teacher.

Disagree. Kids don't like online work any better -- they become "burned out" on screens pretty quickly. Also, the Digital Divide is very real; that is, the computer skills of roughly 30% of my students are woefully inadequate -- they can zip around online, and they can work within computer programs, but they don't really understand how to manipulate computers. That 30% has trouble saving to a flashdrive, printing only page 3 of a document, merging files, or troubleshooting in general. They are consumers of software, not masters of computers.

What kids really like in the classroom: a variety of activities. Read a story, then break up in to groups to complete an activity on that story, back to rows while the teacher introduces a new concept, then play a game to reinforce that material. Short activities, movement, lots of transitions.

Why the district likes online learning: it's cheaper. Kids don't need to be in buildings, don't need transportation, don't need a school nurse or other support staff.

Elitism at its best “then teachers need to find another job”

Yes. It's insulting. All workers are right to be concerned about safety in the workplace right now, and teachers are in a particularly dangerous situation: In a classroom for hours at a time, walking around helping students (which requires being close to them). Interaction between teachers and students is more prolonged than interaction between a shopper and a cashier.

Add to this, we do have a choice: even we feel online learning is second-rate, it IS an option. On the other hand, if teachers fall ill, we lose their usefulness.

that is exactly what our family and the families we know are doing. Only necessary outings for food etc

That's how we've been living too -- and most people I know are doing the same thing.

Bfox254, I am all for online learning, however our teacher's unions have been bad-mouthing "home schooling" for so long that they are getting whiplash now that they are advocating online learning to protect the teachers.

- Online learning led by a teacher isn't the same thing as homeschooling.

- I think I'm in the majority of teachers when I say, Online learning is not as good as being in the classroom, but it is safest option for the moment.

Think Sesame Street and the success with literacy in young children.

Eh, I remember studying Sesame Street in Education 1010. The show is not an unqualified success:

- It was developed in the late 60s to help kids who were starting school without knowing their colors, letters, shapes -- things that most kids pick up naturally in the home. The program is relatable to inner-city kids, and it teaches in short bursts that don't require kids to pay attention for long.

- The show made no difference in the lives of kids who grew up in educationally-enhanced homes; that is, homes where parents talk to their kids, provide them with books and craft materials. Those kids were read for school, and SS was just another layer. It neither helped nor hurt them.

- The show worked in that those at-risk kids who'd been exposed to SS started school ahead of their peers /progressed well in their first couple years of school.

- But the benefits didn't last: those at-risk kids fell behind in 2nd or 3rd grade and remained behind for the remainder of their educational careers. Additionally, their attention span was worse than other at-risk kids who had not watched SS.

To sum-up: Sesame Street provides an early bump for at-risk kids, but the lessons are not helpful to their long-term education. Sesame Street has been studied for a long time -- no online learning program comes close to its popularity /no online learning program has been studied nearly as much.

Amd as usual, kids that go to private school will get the best education (in class) while the rest of the kids get “good enough”.

Disagree. Because every family has chosen to be a part of the school and can pay to attend, private schools have a stronger peer group; however, as you progress through the grades, private schools offer fewer class choices and fewer opportunities for clubs and leadership. Also, public schools provide more opportunities for diversity and a view (good or bad) of the world as a whole -- not just upper class mostly white families. More scholarship winners come from public schools (even considering public schools' larger numbers).

11 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Iris GW

A Georgia second grader tested positive for Covid-19 after attending the first day of school, the school district told CNN.

Sixes Elementary in the Cherokee County School district began in-person classes on Monday. But by Tuesday, a classroom was temporarily closed for deep cleaning and the teacher and 20 other students had been asked to quarantine for two weeks after the second grader tested positive.

https://www.cnn.com/2020/08/05/us/second-grader-coronavirus-first-day-of-school/index.html



Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Marigold

Thank you for the detailed comment, Mrs. Pete. It is worth reading, and then reading a second time.

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Iris GW

Several people in the Corinth School District in Mississippi have been infected with Covid-19, Dr. Thomas Dobbs with the Mississippi State Department of Health said during a news conference.

Dobbs said that more than 100 students in the district have been quarantined after the positive tests.

In a letter to parents posted on their Facebook page today, Corinth School District said a person from Corinth Middle School tested positive as well as an employee at Corinth Elementary School.

Dobbs said this is one of several schools that has had positive cases since returning to in-person classroom instruction in the state.

https://www.cnn.com/world/live-news/coronavirus-pandemic-08-05-20-intl/h_e908aba69ef3a873f00b338b1e9a8c24

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Iris GW

More good ideas:

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis on Thursday pushed for boys and girls athletics this upcoming school year.

Student sports stopped in Florida when schools transitioned to distance learning at the beginning of the pandemic.

“The cancelation of the sports, that has huge effects and so we don’t want to re-live that because I think that it would be depriving our students of opportunity,” he said during a roundtable discussion in Jacksonville, Florida.

DeSantis used himself as an example saying playing athletics made him a better student, not just in high school but in college.

There is an ongoing legal battle over the reopening of schools for in-person instruction in the state. Today, a Miami-Dade judge transferred the case to a judge in Leon County.

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b(zone 9/10)

Adding to Mrs Pete's comment about private schooling, here in my state, requirements for teachers are not the same for private schools vs. public schools. Generally, public school teaching has stricter requirements. It's considered easier to get a job teaching at a private school - and it can pay more too.

Many of the private schools here are religious, and some here in my area allow students the choice of doing a science project -or- a Bible project.

2 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
chisue

Anecdote: I heard an interview on the radio in which a HS administrator said that of the three grammar school systems feeding into his STEM system biology program, the students ranked the same every year. The public school kids had the best preparation. The kids from the nonsectarian private schools had the next best prep. The worst-prepared came from the religious schools. All came in with 'A' grades. His take was that parents demand top grades when they are paying tuition, and get them, regardless!

As for remote learning, both my DGS and his cousin got better grades in their respective high schools this spring. He is in a STEM magnet program in a Chicago public HS. She is in one in Salt Lake City. On the downside, our DIL was unhappy that her best junior high math student simply 'disappeared' when schools shut down. His family probably lost their home; registered mail returned.

CPS has just this week decided to do remote learning until at least November. I'm relieved that DIL will not be exposed. Neither our DGS nor DGD will go to school in person now. Hers is a parochial grammar school, poised to be 'open' like all in the archdiocese; I give that two weeks before they close again due to Covid-19. DIL will continue teaching from the basement 'TV studio' DS set up for her.


2 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Izzy Mn(4)

Enactment on how it will go with facemasks with the younger students back in school. What will really happen:

https://youtu.be/rUCJO6LnE9w

2 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Iris GW

A Georgia school system was just forced to go virtual because so many of the staff was exposed. That's how tricky it is.

A school district in Georgia has decided to start the school year with virtual learning, after more than 90 staff members were forced to quarantine due to a confirmed or suspected case of Covid-19, or due to being exposed to someone who did.

https://www.cnn.com/2020/08/07/us/barrow-county-georgia-schools-covid-19/index.html

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Iris GW

More good news:

Two new studies, though from different parts of the world, have arrived at the same conclusion: that young children not only transmit SARS-CoV-2 efficiently, but may be major drivers of the pandemic as well.

The first, which was published in JAMA yesterday, reports findings from a pediatric hospital in Chicago, Illinois. The second, a preprint manuscript awaiting peer review, was conducted in the mountainous province of Trento, Italy.

The Chicago study examines the concentration of the SARS-CoV-2 in the nasopharynx, or the upper region of the throat that connects to the nasal passages, of children and adults. According to the results, children 5 years and younger who develop mild to moderate Covid-19 symptoms have 10 to 100 times as much SARS-CoV-2 in the nasopharynx as older children and adults.

Whenever these young children cough, sneeze, or shout, they expel virus-laden droplets from the nasopharynx into the air. If they have as much as one hundred times the amount of virus in their throat and nasal passages as adults, it only makes sense that they would spread the virus more efficiently. The study also shows that children from the ages of 5 to 17, also with mild to moderate Covid-19 symptoms, have the same amount of virus in the nasopharynx as adults age 18 and above.

The authors conclude it is likely that young children, while not as prone to suffering from Covid-19 infection, still drive its spread—just as they do with several other respiratory diseases.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/williamhaseltine/2020/07/31/new-evidence-suggests-young-children-spread-covid-19-more-efficiently-than-adults/

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
deegw

“This thing is going away, it will go away like things go away. My view is that schools should be open,” Trump said on Fox and Friends Aug. 5. “If you look at children, children are almost, I would almost say definitely, but almost immune from this disease. So few. Hard to believe. I don’t know how you feel about it but they have much stronger immune systems than we do somehow for this. They don’t have a problem.”

-------------------

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/covid-19-kids-school-children-positive-tests-coronavirus-reopening/

97,000 children reportedly test positive for coronavirus in two weeks as schools gear up for instruction

2 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
vgkg Z-7 Va(Z-7)

"Hard to believe."

^^^ trump's only honest statement above.

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
deegw

Georgia school in viral photos will close for cleaning after nine people test positive for coronavirus

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2020/08/10/9-georgia-students-test-positive-covid-19-viral-school-photo/3333280001/

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b(zone 9/10)

Here's another from here in FL:

https://www.thedailybeast.com/5-year-olds-covid-saga-has-florida-mom-saying-hell-no-to-in-person-school

"...Her son’s ordeal began on June 28 after she and her husband started showing signs of being sick, Polacik explained. “We were both snotty, lethargic, and had other cold-type symptoms,” she said. “But my son’s temperature hit 102 degrees.”

During a first trip to the their pediatrician, Polacik said the doctor who treated him diagnosed Marcellus with an infection, but doubted he had coronavirus, Polacik said. “He didn’t get swabbed and when they looked at his immune system, his white blood cell count was high, so yes, he had an infection.”

Marcellus went home a few hours later. The fever broke and he seemed back to his normal self, Polacik said. “All hell broke loose on Wednesday before Fourth of July,” she said. “He was throwing up, he had diarrhea, and he had pain in his side.”

This time, the entire family, including Marcellus’ baby sister, got tested. The results came back positive, Polacik said. When he was sent home, they gave his parents instructions to give him tylenol, according to discharge paperwork shown to The Daily Beast.

Yet, Marcellus’ discomfort only got worse, his mom said, with the appendicitis and possible blood clots emerging as equally terrifying obstacles to his health.

“The doctors couldn’t tell me 100 percent COVID caused it and that it could be a coincidence that he developed both at the same time,” Polacik said. “But from what I have been reading, coronavirus attacks anything in your body.”

There was a similar case involving a young adult in Savannah, Georgia, around the same time Marcellus got sick, Polacik noted. Lyndsey Gough, a 27-year-old television reporter, shared her traumatic experience with COVID-19. She described having severe abdominal pain that made it hard for her to move a few days after testing positive for coronavirus. She was taken to the ER, where she tested positive a second time, and a CAT scan revealed she had appendicitis. Doctors ended up removing her appendix and part of her colon. While any possible links between the two are still decidedly tentative, a medical study published in May examined how doctors treated eight children with COVID-19 who also exhibited symptoms of appendicitis.

Marcellus went home after seven days of isolation in Palm West’s intensive care unit, his mom said. He may still need surgery to remove his appendix. Polacik said she and her husband have, like so many others parents, had long, difficult conversations about what to do when schools reopen. And while Marcellus’ experience pushed them in that direction, they actually made the final decision to do online learning after speaking to her sister-in-law, who is a teacher.

“I asked her how she feels about it, and she is scared,” Polacik said of another conversation with a friend, also a teacher. “It just takes one parent to say, ‘Oh it’s just the sniffles,’ send their sick kid to school, and spread it like wildfire.”"


1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
catspa_zone9sunset14

Georgia school in viral photos will close for cleaning after nine people test positive for coronavirus

Which is irrelevant and a waste of time for this virus. What is actually needed is a superintendent who isn't an ignorant idiot and who understands that just because the students aren't packed shoulder-to-shoulder in the hallways for a full 15 minutes doesn't mean coronavirus can't be transmitted and students infected. (See below --that actually was his reasoning -- what an ass.) There needs to be less crowding and masks. That masks aren't being required of students under these conditions is virtually criminal negligence.

"On Wednesday, Otott told parents in aletter that although the photo “does not look good,” the conditions were permissible under the Georgia Department of Education’s health recommendations.

The superintendent also misleadingly cited a state health department document listing the different ways people can become infected with the coronavirus.He claimed that exposure occurs after “being within 6 feet of a sick person with COVID-19 for about 15 minutes” but omitted other factors such as being coughed on that can cause the virus to spread faster and more directly." source

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Iris GW

From CNN:

The Cherokee County School District in Georgia reported Monday that 826 students are in quarantine due to possible exposure to Covid-19.

The school returned to in-person learning on Aug. 3.

According to a chart from the district, 42 staff members are in quarantine.

Thirty-eight students and 12 staff members have been tested positive for the virus, according to the district's website.

The district said it has approximately 42,500 students.

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Iris GW

It would seem to be a given that the Thirty-eight students and 12 staff members did not get Covid from being at school since it's only been a week but rather went into school already having it .... hence the 826 students now being in quarantine.

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
maifleur03

I would question what having it means. If the students have been at school for a week they could quite easily test positive for the virus having been infected during that week. Having symptoms within a week is different than being positive.

It only takes one person to infect several in an enclosed environment.

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b(zone 9/10)

Wow...

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b(zone 9/10)

Just saw this - the girl who took the photo of her HS hallway is now being threatened...

https://www.cnn.com/2020/08/10/us/paulding-school-crowded-halls-threats/index.html

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Iris GW

If the students have been at school for a week they could quite easily test positive for the virus having been infected during that week.

Except Georgia testing is notoriously slow. You can't get a result back that fast.

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Iris GW

Also on CNN, here is a school nurse that quit because of lack of precautions:

A school nurse in Georgia who quit over what she considers a lack of Covid-19 precautions said a viral photo of students crowded last week in a high school hallway and the positive coronavirus cases that followed validates her decision.

That is similar to what I said on another post - what will we do when school staff quits?

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Iris GW

I wonder if some people are still excited about schools opening up ... some pro-in-house school folks are carefully ignoring this thread.

3 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Iris GW

Phil Phillips, the coach of the high school football team in Oneonta, Ala., told a local television station, WBMA, that he was not sure how his five players had caught the virus but was concerned about it spreading further. Players were tested after showing symptoms or having a family member test positive.

“I looked my wife in the eyes Monday night before I went to bed and said, I sure hope we didn’t kill anybody’s grandmother today by having a football practice,” Mr. Phillips told the news station last week. “You’re torn, because these kids want to play so bad.”

Football teams, which often meet for practices over the summer, have been one early indicator of the potential spread among students. In July, 18 students, three coaches and 17 of their close contacts became ill after an outbreak in Kentucky on the Hazard High School football team.

And in a small town in Minnesota, Lewiston-Altura High School became the center of a cluster last week when at least six football players tested positive for the virus after attending training camp. The players’ families told the school they had not shown symptoms during training. The school canceled football practices for the rest of the month, but it is still set to open for a mix of in-person and online classes in September.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/08/11/world/coronavirus-covid-19.html

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Iris GW

Etowah High School in Cherokee County will close temporarily after classes Tuesday due to a surge of coronavirus cases, Superintendent Brian Hightower said.

As of this morning, the number of positive cases at the school had increased to a total of 14, with tests for another 15 students pending; and, as a result of the confirmed cases, 294 students and staff are under quarantine and, should the pending tests prove positive, that total would increase dramatically.

Etowah was one of the high schools last week where photographs went viral after dozens of students crammed together in front of the building without masks to celebrate their first day of school.

https://www.gpb.org/news/2020/08/11/etowah-high-school-temporarily-closed-after-covid-19-cases-surge

Save    
Browse Gardening and Landscaping Stories on Houzz See all Stories
Decorating Guides Vintage School Desks Go to the Head of Design Class
Sharpen a pencil and take notes on these ideas for working a nostalgic element into your interior designs
Full Story
Downsizing Simplifying: How to Get Your Grown Kids’ Things Out of the House
Sorting through childhood possessions takes time and the buy-in of your kids. An organizer offers a helpful road map
Full Story
Kids’ Spaces These 10 Things Make Life With Kids Easier
Concessions like a ‘scooter alley,’ scribble space and child-height furnishings help keep family harmony
Full Story