Canada 'lost track' of 35,000 foreigners slated for removal

Lulu Smith

Not just a US problem:


Canada's Border Services Agency "lost track" of two thirds of some 50,000 foreigners who had been hit with expulsion orders, an audit presented to parliament on Wednesday found.

In remaining 15,300 pending cases, the agency knew their whereabouts but in many cases had delayed action for several years.

"Most orders had been enforceable for years, including criminal cases and failed asylum claimants," the report said.

"The accumulation of enforceable removal orders has been an ongoing issue for the Canada Border Services Agency," it said, adding that enforcement was hindered by poor data and flaws in case management.

Also contributing to the backlog were deficiencies in information sharing with Canada's immigration, refugee and citizenship ministry, it found.

At the time of audit, Canada had also suspended expulsion to some 15 countries, including Afghanistan, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Haiti and Iraq.

During the 2018-2019 period, the agency said it had deported nearly 9,500 foreigners but in reality 2,800 of those were turned away at the border and never formally admitted to the country.

https://news.yahoo.com/canada-lost-track-35-000-foreigners-slated-removal-172909750.html



A group of asylum seekers prepare to cross into Canada from the United States

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Comments (31)
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miss lindsey (stillmissesSophie,chase,others)(8a)

The system wasn’t equipped to handle the surge in claimants after the 2017 inauguration.

That’s not an excuse, but it is an explanation.

I’m only concerned about any that might be accused or convicted of violent crimes. Beyond that Canada has been absorbing American expats as refugees since Loyalists in the War of 1812, maybe even before. Not infrequently as draft dodgers and soldiers gone AWOL.

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elvis

Also contributing to the backlog were deficiencies in information sharing with Canada's immigration, refugee and citizenship ministry, it found.

Yep, communication failure between agencies can be problematic. Ask me how we know.

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elvis

It's interesting that if the US had such a report, several of the Canadians here would be talking about it (and how it's no doubt Trump's fault), but we Americans are refraining from disparaging the Canadian government for this um, faux pas. Only Lindsey, who is an American living in Canada, commented, and she took the apologist position.

Revealing, too.

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miss lindsey (stillmissesSophie,chase,others)(8a)

Lol Ann just hasn’t seen it yet ;-)

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miss lindsey (stillmissesSophie,chase,others)(8a)

In all seriousness though, what’s there to say?

It’s true, the article lays out the facts pretty clearly.

All that’s left is to acknowledge and proceed with solutions. There’s nothing “apologist” about it, I never said it was acceptable or should remain unaddressed.

The fact remains that the number of refugee claimants from the US into Canada nearly doubled in 2017. Spin that any way you like but it happened, for some reason, and it had a chaotic effect.

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Marigold

I did like the post and Lindsey's comment. Personally, I have very mixed feelings about asylum seekers, and the standard of proof they need to stay. I was involved with a woman whose husband went missing in Columbia, and she presumed he was killed by a drug lord, as he was a peace officer. She applied for asylum in Canada and was declined, because there was no proof her husband was dead.
I was off the case by the time it went to appeal, and I never did find out if she was allowed to stay, but at that point, I decided I was a-ok with people who wanted to come in, as long as they wanted to contribute to our society and were not criminals.
Had I not been involved in a professional capacity, I would have slipped her money and told her to run and to find a new life.
My parents were immigrants. I don't really feel like I can shut the gate just because I am safe.

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jmm1837

It's an issue of communications, or lack thereof, between different departments and agencies, along with problematic computer systems and manpower issues. The other, on- going problem is actually effecting a removal if the receiving country refuses to admit the deportee undocumented (which is an issue for every country trying to deport people). That's an explanation, by the way, not an excuse. Even Australia, which has much better systems, complete with exit controls, has lost quite a few "overstayers." At least the matter is open to public scrutiny and criticism, as it should be.

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Nana H

Elvis, your comment was a tad hasty. Now why would that be? Facts are not all of us are night hawks and/or have other things we like to do before retiring for the evening. Time Zones do play in.

This isn't particularly shocking to me tracking and dealing with those in the country illegally has never been much of a priority with the Canadian government.

I am glad the audit did as it should do and found the breakdowns although I am not convinced much will be done about it.

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tryingtounderstand

Sheesh, govt at its best. What more can be said. SIL works the govt dept directly responsible for immigration. She has stated that even when deportation cases succeed, it is often difficult to track the individual to get them out of the country.

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bleusblue2

elvis

It's interesting that if the US had such a report, several of the Canadians here would be talking about it (and how it's no doubt Trump's fault), but we Americans are refraining from disparaging the Canadian government for this um, faux pas. Only Lindsey, who is an American living in Canada, commented, and she took the apologist position.

Revealing, too.

~~~~

Revealling of what?

Canadians go on their own stodgy way of checking into this. They aren't as divided as Americans-- what upsets EVERYBODY is the separation of children from parents with no possibility of tracing their location!!!.

I knew a family who stayed and developed a stable life while they waited for their refugee case to be heard, both parents working, one son being scouted for his hockey talent. It took several years and their case was rejected they had to go to another country. It's sad to see these rejections.

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Ann

"Revealing, too."

Agreed!

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Ann

"Lol Ann just hasn’t seen it yet ;-)"

Lol, she has seen it ;-)

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Nana H

"Only Lindsey, who is an American living in Canada, commented, and she took the apologist position."

Revealing, too."

You guys are a hoot. Revealing of what?

You realty expect people to comment on a thread within an hour of it being posted and approximately 9 PM Eastern time to boot ? Give me a break .....another swing and a miss.

ETA Miss L lives on the west coast it was somewhere around 6PM for her.

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batyabeth

a family finally, desperately, dangerously and frighteningly somehow escapes Afghanistan. Somehow they make it to the Canadian border. You gonna look them in the eye and send the BACK? To Afghanistan?

I can only hope you and yours never, never have to ask the question, "how do you know when it's time to run?" Many of our posters' families did ask just that - including mine, my DW's and my ex's - and ran for their lives. Sorry, but there's a point where humanity raises it's burning eyes and says, sure, give me your wretched refuse, your tempest- tossed, and resepcts the immigrant for what they are: the ones who want in that desperately are the ones who are that despaerate.

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patriciae_gw(07)

Are we pretending the US doesn't have as many or more people lost in the system? Heck, we have Canadians here who have over stayed Visas. Why are we supposed to care about people in Canada? Their systems are not perfect? Pot/kettle.

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bleusblue2

patriciae --it's OK -- Canadians don't mind being kettle/pot or pot/kettle. Canadians are very aware that none of their systems are perfect. As I said before, they aren't so divided and so it's not that easy to stir them up.

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elvis

patriciae_gw(07)

Are we pretending the US doesn't have as many or more people lost in the system? Heck, we have Canadians here who have over stayed Visas. Why are we supposed to care about people in Canada? Their systems are not perfect? Pot/kettle.

Exactly my point. Just turn it around, Canadians complain about the USA (even though their systems are imperfect) unendingly here on HT, we don't return the "favor".

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Ziemia(6a)

Don't get the issue. I have no problem with Canadians being familiar with and having opinions on USA issues.

And, the best way to keep track of residents (whether they are immigrants or not) it to have a super controlling government, such as a police state. Which I want no part of.

So having large numbers of untracked immigrants raises no particular alarm bells for me, whether it be here or Canada.

Weird....


Now, if Canada started rounding up groups of immigrants and caging them, I would be expressing concern disagreement.

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Nana H

"Canadians complain about the USA"

I don't think that is generally true. You confuse complaining about Trump with complaining about the US. I rarely have an opinion, not true, rarely share my opinion on American domestic issues.

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Ann

:)

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patriciae_gw(07)

I also have no problem with anyone in the world opining on America. We are one big elephant.

We don't return the "favor" because we know so little about Canada. How can we comment?

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Nana H

I should ammend my post to say that I try and limit my opinions to Trump and American politics and avoid offering criticism on domestic issues.

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miss lindsey (stillmissesSophie,chase,others)(8a)

“Now, if Canada started rounding up groups of immigrants and caging them, I would be expressing concern disagreement.”

And a few thousand people who are legal American citizens. https://abcnews.go.com/Politics/marine-veteran-us-citizens-detained-ice-aclu/story?id=67465583

And it would be well deserved.

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jmm1837

batyabeth - if its any reassurance, it would be most unlikely for an Afghan to make it to Canada and file a refugee claim there: they simply don't have access to the money to pay the people smugglers. So the Afghans who are in Canada were mostly selected directly out of refugee camps in Pakistan, etc, and arrived after being processed by Canadian immigration authorities. (Canada actually has quite a generous offshore resettlement program for refugees in third countries, especially in Asia and Africa.) But if an Afghan did manage to get there without a visa, odds are very high that Canada's refugee board would grant him asylum. The people under deportation orders are people who have committed crimes or visa fraud, or simply overstayed, and who have no claim to refugee status. And, so far as I know, Canada does not detain children.

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isabellagracepan

I am Canadian and I agree that Canada should try to be more organized in the future. 35,000 people is certainly a big number to lose track of!That being said, I feel like that it is unlikely Canadians are going to become super up in arms about this report. Canadians tend to be pretty welcoming of immigrants. About half of the citizens of large cities of Toronto and Vancouver are immigrants, and Canadians really enjoy being part of a multicultural country. The anti-immigrant fear mongering has definitely not caught on in mainstream politics. Thank Goodness!

Hopefully the bureaucracy will get itself sorted out and they will become better at keeping track of people as they go through the asylum process. I certainly support efficiency, but I wouldn't want to see any families separated or denied asylum unfairly. I am glad that they are prioritizing the criminal cases, since clearly that is the pressing issue in terms of public safety.

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bleusblue2

The point I try to make here is that if Americans have a criticism Canada, welcome to it. We can argue on the facts. Kettle/pot pot/kettle. It doesn't matter.

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Stan Areted

Give me a break.

I know Canadians that complained about President Bush.

Perhaps the people that were supposed to be keeping track of the 35,000 foreigners were otherwise engaged inserting themselves into U.S. politics.

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jmm1837

Oh for crying out loud. Bush starts a war (which involves Canadian troops) and Canadians aren't supposed to comment? Trump gives the Russians an invitation to do whatever the heck they want in Syria and Ukraine (a country with which Canada has strong historic links) and Canadians aren't supposed to comment? Trump threatens to cut off surgical masks to Canada in a pandemic and Canadians aren't supposed to take umbrage?

Canadians have every right to comment on things the US does that affect Canada, just as Australians are currently bemoaning the weak (call it non-existent) Trump policy on containing Chinese expansion in the Pacific.

The US doesn't get to mess around with other countries' interests and future and expect that no one is going to say "hey, wait a minute, did you consider the consequences of what you're doing?" You want to be a world power; then expect to get feedback from the world.

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Ann

"just as Australians are currently bemoaning the weak (call it non-existent) Trump policy on containing Chinese expansion in the Pacific"

Would you please elaborate on what you think is happening, what you expect the U.S. to be doing, and why?

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jmm1837

China has been leaning hard on Australia (sanctions, a war of words over students, etc), has been going after Taiwan while the world focuses on Covid, and now is shutting down Hong Kong. It's been using its economic weight to build influence and bully lesser nations in the specific for some years now. The counterbalance has always been the united front presented by the US, Australia, and the South and East Pacific nations.


Now, here is a quote from a recent joint media release following a teleconference between the Australian and Japanese PMs:


"They further recognised the importance of cooperating to address challenges to a free, open, inclusive and prosperous Indo-Pacific region that have become more acute amid the pandemic, including coercive and unilateral actions and disinformation, and the need to ensure the resilience of critical supply chains while maintaining open and rules-based markets."


And here's an interpretation of that statement in the article I'm linking to below:

"It's not hard to think that they were talking about China in all this, though the references to many of the international and multilateral organisations produced a strange, lonely echo of days of yore, when the United States was actively involved in such bodies, not actively withdrawing from them."

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-07-11/australia-vulnerable-neighbours-alliances-china-us/12442732

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jmm1837

And here's another article:


"The broader difficulty is that America’s allies fear that the Trump administration’s goal is not to compel China to follow international rules — an aim they would support — but to destroy the rules. The allies know that the White House has pulled the US out of the Paris climate accord, the Iran nuclear deal and the Trans-Pacific Partnership, and is deliberately hobbling both the World Trade Organization and the World Health Organization. They remember that the president has threatened to impose tariffs on Germany and Japan — and has expressed scepticism about Nato and hostility towards the EU. They also know that Mr Trump is up for re-election in November, and suspect his motives in going after China now. The sad truth is that America’s allies in Europe and Asia are also angered by Beijing’s behaviour. They simply do not trust the Trump administration’s leadership in countering it."


https://www.ft.com/content/b9a063aa-9057-11ea-9207-ace009a12028

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