...So God Made A Farmer...

catkinZ8a



SaveComment45Like3
Comments (45)
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Lynn Heins

Always have loved this! From a farm family in southern Illinois...

2 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
queenmargo

I just finished watching the movie/ documentary " the Biggest Little Farm".

Now I want to go visit;)

2 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
shaxhome(Frog Rock, Australia 9b)

Should have known why this popped up out of the blue...


3 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
catkinZ8a

1965




6 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
arcy_gw

How fast it happened catkin!! The enlightened of the age just can't see the slippery slopes and they deny the TRUTH that just because we can doesn't mean we should!!


3 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Toby

Then Republican-supported agribusiness and Donald Trump's tariffs destroyed the family farms. But what did it matter? They couldn't find anyone to pick the crops anyway.

7 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
HU-885118952

catkin, watch the Left tear into that commercial now. It's raaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaacist...

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Annie Deighnaugh

There is disturbing news from America's heartland. A recent report from the American Farm Bureau Federation says the number of farms filing for bankruptcy is up 24% from the previous year. It's the steepest rise the farming industry has seen in years, and the total farm debt for 2019 is expected to hit $416 billion, a record high. source NPR

Just another example of how trump puts Americans first, right?

4 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Ziemia(6a)

Worth repeating:

It's [bankruptcy filings] the steepest rise the farming industry has seen in years, and the total farm debt for 2019 is expected to hit $416 billion, a record high. source NPR

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
bleusblue2

I couldn't decide whether to start a new thread with this, but it does fit here.


https://www.nytimes.com/2020/02/14/us/politics/trump-farm-bailout-investigation.html?searchResultPosition=1


EXCERPT FROM NYT:

U.S. Watchdog to Investigate Trump’s Farm Bailout Program

The Government Accountability Office will review how the $28 billion farm bailout aimed at cushioning trade-related losses was spent.

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Government Accountability Office is opening a review of President Trump’s $28 billion bailout for farmers harmed by his trade war amid allegations that the money was mismanaged and allocated unfairly.

The investigation came at the request of Senator Debbie Stabenow, a Michigan Democrat, who has been vocal in her concern that the aid program was biased, providing more funds to southern states that voted for Mr. Trump and favoring large and foreign agriculture companies over small farms.

2 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
arthurm2015(Micro-Climate, Zone 10b Sydney, Australia)

I did have a post here which I deleted because it contained a God delusion reference.

There was a family 25 acre farm ages ago that has been swallowed up by the spread of urban Sydney.

The ancestors grew Citrus and ran chickens underneath to eat the weeds and pests and fertilise the Citrus. Old time religious greenies who supported the local Baptist church.

Anyway, I think many people have that farming instinct/inclination whatever, even though they might not even have a backyard.

As for Donald the Tariff King. Nuff said.

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
arthurm2015(Micro-Climate, Zone 10b Sydney, Australia)

An appropriate sterile background to the message!


2 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Ziemia(6a)

That farm message is clearly photoshopped. Any surprise?

Sure, it's possible some message was plowed but it didn't come out in a photo so the photo was changed.

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
mudhouse

Annie: Just another example of how trump puts Americans first, right?

I'm not a farmer, Annie, although my family on both sides were farmers, two generations back. From the same NPR article that you excerpted, but didn't link to:

https://www.npr.org/2019/11/10/778097948/farm-bankruptcies-surge

Dale Moore from the American Farm Bureau Federation explains multiple factors are involved, "you've got to look back over six years."

He goes on to discuss the loss of nearly half net farm income, and attributes it to markets, trade wars in recent years, and other factors in a commodity market. Asked about weather, he says that's always a factor.

And when NPR's Michael Martin whines that a lot of people don't understand the continued support by farmers for President Trump's policies, Moore answers that China has been a challenge to work with, and to get them to play fair. He then mentions Trump's regulation reform, and points out "regulation can suck as much out of your pocket as a trade war, or Mother Nature."

"It's also tax reform and other things going on there. So you kind of go down the list of things that he's getting credit for them. And if you talk to some of them, they'll just straight-up say, well, you know, may be frustrated at how this is going on the trade front, but at least he's in there fighting."

Annie, Trump is willing to take on the hard challenge of China negotiations. Nobody realistically expects it to be easy or without cost, not even the farmers directly impacted. Some of the benefits will take years to prove out. Sometimes putting America first means having the courage to tackle critical issues that won't have immediate benefits. That's what good presidents do. That's their job.

I agree with Dale Moore. At least Trump is in there fighting for the American farmers.

2 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Tito Milian

Trump also knows that farmers see this as a temporary measure, and they don’t want generational welfare. In that, their goals align , as does their vision of America .

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Ziemia(6a)

Worth repeating:

Worth repeating:

It's [bankruptcy filings] the steepest rise the farming industry has seen in years, and the total farm debt for 2019 is expected to hit $416 billion, a record high. source NPR

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
sheesh(5b)

Yes, Ziemia. Just "Perfect" for agribusiness.

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Toby

Some of the benefits will take years to prove out.

There is an unpredictable factor in these trade negotiations and it's called China. Trump's trade agreement is nothing more than a plan on a wing and a prayer. No one knows if it will work out in the farmers' favor. All Trump can do is make promises. Sadly many still trust his promises.

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Tito Milian

lol, it sure beats the messiah kicking the can down the road because waaa too hard.

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
mudhouse

https://www.agweb.com/article/trump-approval-strongest-yet-he-heads-farm-bureau-convention

Sorry, Toby, but farmers don't appear to be lining up to support your lack of confidence in Trump's policies.

From the above link:

This is the third consecutive year the president has spoken before the gathering of farmers and ranchers from across the country, and according to the latest Farm Journal Pulse Poll, he may receive his warmest greeting yet.

Overall job approval for President Trump ticked up a point in January to 83% of the 1,286 respondents, the high mark in the months that Farm Journal has been tracking the president’s approval. Only 16% disapprove.

“Of note is the strongly approve category went up three percentage points from an already lofty (December) number and his highest overall approval ratings ever,” notes Pro Farmer policy analyst Jim Wiesemeyer.

“That says the president's approval is rock-solid. With the recent upbeat news on USMCA and the Phase 1 accord with China, the ratings will likely remain firm ahead.”

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Toby

Trump isn't the one suffering--no skin off his nose. The farmers are suffering while we wait and see if his experiment works. That's what makes it waa too hard--the toll on human lives when farms go bankrupt, when crops can't be sold while China finds other markets. This is Trump's "negotiation" problem. He has no idea how to implement his "vision" when there are factors he can't control. The only deal-making he understands is bullying and bullying won't work against everyone. When that fails, he has no plan B. That's why HE has kicked the can down the road on healthcare.

3 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Toby

Sorry, Toby, but farmers don't appear to be lining up to support your lack of confidence in Trump's policies.

It doesn't matter what they think or what the polls say. It's still hoping on a wing and a prayer. They're not ready to give up on him yet. We will all have to wait and see what China does.

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Toby

I'm curious about which publications Trump supporters have been reading these last two years of trade negotiations with China and how much you understand about China.

2 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
LoneJack Zn 6a, KC

Considering how much of the Missouri River valley that has been flooded in recent years, a higher rate of farm bankruptcy is not surprising. Crop prices have been down since the 2012-2013 peak but fairly flat in recent years with small peaks and valleys.

My concern for family farming has more to do with the aging of farmers and the younger generation's disinterest in continuing the farming tradition. Can't really blame them...it's a hard life.

2 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
mudhouse

I agree LoneJack, a hard life, and one that deserves the continuing respect of all of us. It's awfully easy to take the benefits of an efficient and modern farming industry for granted, as we choose our groceries from shelves full of safe and healthy foods.

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Ziemia(6a)

And much of our fresh veggies require field labor.

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
LoneJack Zn 6a, KC

^^^ My fresh veggies are a labor of love!

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Toby

But those illegal Mexicans have taken the picking jobs from "the blacks" so blacks should vote for Trump who will rid of us the vermin and give those jobs back to our own poor. Time for blacks to get on the GOP plantation, right?

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
paprikash

Loved Charlie Daniels response to Bloomberg:


Charlie Daniels

✔@CharlieDaniels

Hey Bloomberg you know as much about farming as a hog knows about an airplane, so how are you going to teach somebody else how to do it,
Better stay in NYC where corn comes in cans.

5 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
sheesh(5b)

Anyone who grows fresh veggies does it as a labor of love, wouldn't you say? Would that we could grow enough with our love to feed the community!

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
LoneJack Zn 6a, KC

I'm not picking enough beans and peas to feed the community! Tomatoes and Peppers maybe :-P

2 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Ziemia(6a)

Toby, well said.

Though, based on response to one of my comments, some will take that opinion as being one you hold personally. Instead of seeing it for what it is: a summary of comments made here by some Trump supporters.

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Toby

Yes, it's tongue-in-cheek, based on comments I've been reading here recently.

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
zmith


Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
arthurm2015(Micro-Climate, Zone 10b Sydney, Australia)

Nah, Nah, Nah is a waste of time!

Talk $$$$$

Soy $$$$$ in pre. Tariffs?

Soy $$$$$ in post Tariffs?

Soy Farmers Tax payer help pre Tariffs?

Soy Farmers Tax payer help post Tariffs?

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
arthurm2015(Micro-Climate, Zone 10b Sydney, Australia)

Of course the photo does not break any rules, but what does it achieve here?

Heaven forbid, if I was Science Fiction transported to the USA, I would vote for the Socialist almost commie Democrats!

Get real! it is 2020 and Ancient Fairy Stories and 1950/60s tariffs are obsolete.


2 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Jenn TheCaLLisComingFromInsideTheHouse(5)

The flooding and other natural disasters aren't likely to go away ever, but there are signs of them getting increasingly worse in the years and decades ahead. The ice in our North and South poles is definitely melting, exposing the darker surfaces underneath creates more melting - the light reflecting properties of ice reduces melting. Areas that were not quite desert but not quite lush and green are becoming more desert-like (in some instances not all), 'fire season' starts earlier and earlier while getting worse and worse.

Maybe when all those farms go bankrupt and the people living and working on the land are forced to move, there will finally be a place to get all those environmental studies/approvals and start on building an adequate amount of residential housing at an affordable price for those who will live there. Unfortunately there may not be adequate employment available in such places and then there's the matter of where/how we'll feed Americans the things that comprise a healthy diet. But there will be housing!

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
shead

Farming is such a complicated and costly endeavor with many, MANY factors contributing the death of the family farm such as disinterested succession, being too leveraged, equipment prices, labor shortages, estate taxes, crop and livestock prices, etc. Everything must be large scale which means there is less room for the small farmer these days when small tractors are over $100k each and combines can be in the millions. Too many tried to get in when prices were at all time highs and leveraged too heavily praying that prices would stay high. Dairy farmers are struggling against the corporate dairies of Walmart, etc. All that to say that the farming crisis has been building for a long time. Those of us who have refused to over-leverage are doing okay even in a down turn.


2 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Jenn TheCaLLisComingFromInsideTheHouse(5)

Dairy farming and milk processing businesses are not doing well at all these days, not as many people consume the traditional dairy cow milk now, instead they want soy or almond or whatever other 'pseudo-milk'/'milk-like' product is out there on grocery shelves.

Farmers have always operated on exceedingly slim margins between what they must invest in a year's crop, how much of that crop is yielded and how much others will be willing to pay for said crop. If there aren't enough (or any) buyers, then the farmer won't be able to sell their crop which is what the farmer depends on in order to be able to do it all again the next year.


Meanwhile, we're sending clothes and other textile goods to landfills in order to be good followers of capitalism (You don't wear a dress from last season, not even if you only wore it once and it's still in practically brand new mint condition! You buy a new dress!) - & grocery stores and restaurant kitchens end up with mountains of wasted food that couldn't be sold or consumed before the stuff went bad. All the waste streams humans produce, the damage done to the soil by standard farming practices (Wasn't soy a crop that farmers were told they should plant when giving a field a break from using to plant crops that had a higher rate of $ return?)


Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
shead

Yes, I agree ^^^^. Farming, in general, is suffering a lot because of the current societal trend away from dairy products, grains, and meat. Apparently, it's all bad for us and therefore, farmers are often demonized.

I would disagree with the comment about standard farming practices damaging the soil. Farmers are the some of the best conservationists I know because our livelihood depends on it. From rotational grazing, planting cover crops, adding fertilizers, etc., farmers know that depleting the soil and contributing to erosion by and large hurts the farmer more than anyone. Crop farmers plant soy and corn rotationally because each crop takes certain nutrients and then deposits nutrients into the field that the other crop needs. Here, the standard is 2 years in a row of one crop then 2 years of the other. Many crop farmers I know hedge their losses with insurance and in the commodities futures market but in the end, it's still all a gamble each year. We raise beef cattle instead of crops and the market tends to be a little more stable and less volatile than the grain markets. It always feels like boom or bust, though, no matter which one you're in. A few years ago, the cattle industry had a boom but we all knew then that it wouldn't last and we had to make provisions for when the tide inevitably turned. It's not in the tank now, but definitely not as lucrative. Thankfully, we aren't leveraged enough to feel a lot of pain.

It's too bad Bloomberg doesn't understand the complexities and the expertise that goes into farming and actually being able to survive.

3 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
JodiK

What passes for "safe and healthy" according to the USDA is a joke of obscene proportions! Read our country's labeling laws and others pertaining to our overall food source and what is allowed, and it becomes obvious that money is way more important than the safety and health of American citizens!

Doesn't it strike anyone as odd, to say the least, that food and drugs are part of the same agency, I ask rhetorically? And also, read what actually constitutes "organic" by our governmental agencies' standards. Pathetic.

Big Ag is just another format for greed. It's all those small family owned farms that we need, and they are the ones suffering for the avarice of the few.



1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
floodwaters

86% of farmers support Trump. You can read up on it in Successful Farming. As a lifelong farmer, from beef and sheep to horses and crops, I support Trump. Amazing how so many with no clue to the farming game can have so much to say about things they know so little!/ Go ahead , hate trump for anything ya want, he is getting 4 more years.

4 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
shead

Totally agree, @floodwaters!

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
arthurm2015(Micro-Climate, Zone 10b Sydney, Australia)

Here in the Southern Ocean, the farmers have their own political party and that is needed because farmers have particular needs, examples fuel costs and distance to major population centres.

So, I can understand why they might support President Trump especially so, after the bailout when the soy bean export industry was destroyed.


Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
bleusblue2

"So, I can understand why they might support President Trump especially so, after the bailout when the soy bean export industry was destroyed."

~~~~

why was the soybean export industry destroyed?

Save    
Browse Gardening and Landscaping Stories on Houzz See all Stories
Your First House So You Want to Get a Cat
If you're a cat lover, the joys outweigh any other issue. If you haven't lived with one yet, here are a few things to know
Full Story
Your First House So You're Thinking About Getting a Dog
Prepare yourself for the realities of training, cost and the impact that lovable pooch might have on your house
Full Story
Laundry Rooms Room of the Day: A Laundry So Cheery, Wash Day Is Wonderful
Pretty paint and playful touches banish chore-day blahs in a laundry room designed for a magazine’s Idea House
Full Story