Trump's prayer breakfast jibes--disagrees with Jesus' Sermon on Mount

dublinbay z6 (KS)

One of the big shockers of the past couple days is the blasphemous words issuing from the mouth of Trump at the "National Prayer Breakfast" right after he was acquitted. No one uttered a peep in contradiction, as far as I can tell.

Fortunately, afterwards, a few faith leaders spoke up (but not too loudly).


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"The National Prayer Breakfast - a Washington tradition since 1953 - is by custom a respite from partisan bickering. President Donald Trump shattered that tradition Thursday with aggressive remarks that buoyed his allies but dismayed a wide spectrum of faith leaders.

[. . .]

In a keynote address before Trump’s speech, Arthur Brooks, a Harvard professor and president of a conservative think tank, had decried a “crisis of contempt and polarization” and urged his listeners to ”love your enemies."

I don't know if I agree with you,” said Trump. He then took a swipe at Utah Sen. Mitt Romney, a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints who had cited his faith in becoming the only Republican to vote for Trump's removal.

“I don't like people who use their faith as justification for doing what they know is wrong," Trump said.

“Nor do I like people who say, 'I pray for you' when you know that is not so,” Trump added, in a reference to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who has offered that message even as she led the impeachment effort.

[. . .]

One of Trump’s leading allies in the conservative Christian evangelical community, the Rev. Robert Jeffress of the Southern Baptist megachurch First Baptist Dallas, embraced the president’s remarks.

“I think the president was completely right in what he said,” Jeffress said. “It’s not politically correct, but he didn’t get to be president by being politically correct.”

Jeffress, who said he dined with Trump and Prayer Breakfast organizers at the White House on Wednesday, said the criticism of Pelosi was justified.

[. . .]

As for Romney, Jeffress contended that the senator’s decision to vote for Trump’s removal “seems more based on self-promotion than religious beliefs.”

Among Romney’s fellow Mormons in Utah, views were mixed.

“I don’t like that he’s the only member of the U.S. Senate on the Republican side who says, ‘I’m a man of God’ so he has to vote a certain way,” said former GOP legislator Mike Noel.

However, Emma Petty Addams, executive director of Mormon Women for Ethical Government, said Romney “really exemplifies the way faith can be used in the public sphere in a very positive way.”

The Rev. Jim Wallis, founder of the Christian social justice group Sojourners, took note of Trump’s assertion that faith should not be used as a justification for doing what someone knows is wrong.

"Apply this logic to Trump's white evangelical supporters: they are willing to trade off and even sell out Jesus for the reward of getting judges they like in the Supreme Court,” Wallis said via email. . . .

Professor Robert Franklin, who teaches moral theology at Emory University’s Candler School of Theology in Atlanta, also evoked Jesus.

If the president is feeling persecuted, he would be well served to spend quality time with his pastor while studying what Jesus did when he was persecuted,” Franklin suggested. “The religion of Jesus promotes the virtues of humility, self-accountability, forgiveness and reconciliation.

A Conservative Jewish rabbi in Encino, California, Noah Farkas of the Valley Beth Shalom congregation, asserted that both Romney and Pelosi “are moved by their respective faith traditions.”

I find it deeply problematic that the president uses the National Prayer Breakfast to lambaste the faith of his opponents,” Farkas said. ”He forgets the history of faith in this country, and disrespects others who speak from their sense of faithful conscience.”


https://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/trumps-prayer-breakfast-jibes-jolt-faith-leaders-68807388

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In the meantime, Trump continues to enjoy full evangelical (uncritical) support.

And some people opine the decline of religion in our times. Can't imagine why--can you?

Kate

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ohiomom

Trump does not forget the history of faith in this country, he has none. He is a bitter old man who attacks private citizens, legislatures from the opposite party and world leaders. He does not talk and/or walk as a man of faith.

There are many Christians that do not support him and come November we will let our voices be heard.



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Kathy

Trump has no idea what a Prayer Breakfast is and more he doesn’t care. Everything is about him. He uses it as an opportunity for a rally or to beat up others. The man needs prayers, something he has no concept of.

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Toby

The history and sponsorship of that Prayer Breakfast is pretty creepy--Douglas Coe and The Fellowship aka The Family, which is basically just a religious cult that caters to the Christian elite.

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chipotle

Trump has no comprehension of the meaning of the word love. That's abundantly clear by all of his words and actions.

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blfenton

A person of faith would know that one prays for all, whether they are your "enemy" or your loved one. Prayers are committed for a number of reasons and for trump to diss those who pray for all shows that he is not a person of faith but rather one of hate.

I was and am surprised that more people have not spoken up about this behaviour.

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socks(10a)

Toby, you might be referring to the Netflix movie, "The Family." I didn't watch it but my friend told me about it.

Trump is faking it as far as any spiritual faith he might have. Remember when he was asked to share his favorite Bible passage? (In case you don't remember, he was unable to mention one.)

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Toby

Yes, I did watch it but didn't finish it. The Family believes that certain politicians are selected by God to lead us, and of course we've heard that said about Trump. The leader of The Family decides who those politicians are. Mark Sandford was one of the anointed ones until he decided to go on a hike in Argentina. I don't trust that that breakfast is simply to pray for good will towards all. Now I'm reading that there are other events associated with the breakfast and I can only imagine what's being discussed.

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catkinZ8a

Who's an atheist?

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maddie260

Toby, The Family is a disturbing look at the role religion plays in government. I recommend it to everyone.

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carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b(zone 9/10)

Rep. Pelosi had some sharp words about it yesterday. She seemed righteously angry, saying Mr. Trump apparently doesn't understand prayer.

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nancy_in_venice_ca Sunset 24 z10

Jeff Sharlet has written extensively on the Fellowship aka the Family.

*

How the National Prayer Breakfast offers foreign lobbyists a chance to “pay to play”

Journalist and author Jeff Sharlet on the National Prayer Breakfast, Maria Butina, and the group that calls itself “the Family.”


https://www.vox.com/2018/7/18/17586516/jeff-sharlet-maria-butrina-national-prayer-breakfast-the-family


In his 2009 book, The Family: The Secret Fundamentalism at the Heart of American Power, Sharlet chronicled the influence of a Christian organization known publicly as “the Fellowship” (and internally as “the Family”), the founders and administrators of the National Prayer Breakfast. The Family — of which Sharlet reports Vice President Mike Pence and Attorney General Jeff Sessions are members — is an intensely powerful organization, whose specific vision of Jesus as the ideal “strongman” governs their political theology and who have found, in strongman-sympathetic President Trump, an ideal vessel for their beliefs.

“What’s interesting about Trump is that he’s not really a believer, yet he’s put together the most fundamentalist Cabinet in US history,” Sharlet told me Wednesday. “There has never been one like this. It’s the most Family-friendly.”

Sharlet says the Family often uses the National Prayer Breakfast, and the events surrounding it, as a backdoor recruiting and diplomacy tool for between lobbyists and foreign governments that organizers feel share its “strongman” approach, without formal government oversight.

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woodnymph2_gw

We must continue to fight hard for the separation of church and state in our nation.

Perhaps this partly explains why some Fundamentalist Evangelicals I am acquainted with voted for Trump and still defend him.

How can they believe that the 'Prince of Peace" has anything in common with Trump?

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vgkg (Va Z-7)

“I don't like people who use their faith as justification for doing what they know is wrong," Trump said.

Trump shouldn't call out his base like that...but they'll cough up another mulligan for him anyways even though they know it's wrong like he said.

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don_socal

There is a basic part of who we are that has nothing to do with religion or politics. It is that feeling in your being that something is right or not right as it is happening. Some choose to ignore the feeling however it presents itself. Others are in tune with it and respond accordingly. If it is strong it feels like a knife twisting in your heart when things are not proper. When things are going well it is a restful relief like doing Yoga or Tia Chi and gives rest even when there is exertion. Prayer is a physical response to life and is expressed in deeds not words. Some have not been exposed to true prayer or good deeds in general so have no clue what that is. It is sad that we have so many in the governing body that do not have the experience to be charitable and better the world around them. They seem to attract each other and will someday get what is a disease to them of doing the right thing in spite of their life as it is, let us hope their eye open soon for the sake of the humans and life on the planet.

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Kathy

Toby, I can see what you are referring to with The Family. Sessions, Pompeo, Pence, Barr, and others. It is obvious their agenda might be similar to Trump’s or they have latched onto his star and vice versa. I don’t believe Trump is religious but he and The Family seem to work well together.

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Toby

Who picked Pence as Trump's VP?

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queenmargo

I am sure the family, lol

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nancy_in_venice_ca Sunset 24 z10

Who picked Pence as Trump's VP?

John Kasich refused when he was offered the position.

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haydayhayday

If the president is feeling persecuted, he would be well served to spend quality time with his pastor while studying what Jesus did when he was persecuted,” Franklin suggested. “The religion of Jesus promotes the virtues of humility, self-accountability, forgiveness and reconciliation.


Jesus got hung up on cross....by the local politicians.

Can't blame Trump for not following his path.

You are all very funny.

Bashing and hating Trump because he doesn't love enough.

Funny


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Toby

I remember hearing he was a Koch guy like Paul Ryan but that wouldn't make sense if Pence was selected to advance Christianity per The Family. I know he was selected to compensate for Trump's shortcomings in the morals and ethics department but I wonder if anyone else was behind his selection.

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haydayhayday

"And some people opine the decline of religion in our times. Can't imagine why--can you?"

Easy enough to understand when it's used as a shield as you attack your opponents.

Hay

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dublinbay z6 (KS)

“I don't like people who use their faith as justification for doing what they know is wrong,"

Trump's complaint, repeated often by his followers. The only problem is that the "wrong" Trump was referring to was any action taken against Trump.

However, the anti-Trumpers do not view impeaching Trump as a "wrong"--nor is campaigning against Trump a "wrong"--nor is making critical comments on Trump's shortcomings or opposing his initiatives "wrong."

Except to Trump, that is.

No one who opposes Trump is, in any way, using "their faith as justification for doing what they know is wrong." Not Pelosi. Not Schumer. Not Romney. Nor anyone else opposing Trump.

It is Trump who is "doing what he knows is wrong."

Kate

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haydayhayday

Praise the Lord and pass the Ammunition.

Funny.

Hay

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chipotle

Manafort picked Pence.

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maddie260

Karma is going to be a b****.

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haydayhayday


carolb:

"Rep. Pelosi had some sharp words about it yesterday. She seemed righteously angry, saying Mr. Trump apparently doesn't understand prayer."

I understand prayer.

It's people who believe in fairies and goblins and things that go Trump in the night.

People talking to themselves and trying to pass it off as something other than the ramblings of a deranged mind.

Hay

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