Black Americans deeply pessimistic about country under Trump

dandyfopp

Black Americans deeply pessimistic about country under Trump, whom more than 8 in 10 describe as ‘a racist,’ Post-Ipsos poll finds

https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/black-americans-deeply-pessimistic-about-country-under-president-who-more-than-8-in-10-describe-as-a-racist-post-ipsos-poll-finds/2020/01/16/134b705c-37de-11ea-bb7b-265f4554af6d_story.html


Jan. 17, 2020 at 6:30 a.m. EST

President Trump made a stark appeal to black Americans during the 2016 election when he asked, “What have you got to lose?” Three years later, black Americans have rendered their verdict on his presidency with a deeply pessimistic assessment of their place in the United States under a leader seen by an overwhelming majority as racist.

The findings come from a Washington Post-Ipsos poll of African Americans nationwide, which reveals fears about whether their children will have a fair shot to succeed and a belief that white Americans don’t fully appreciate the discrimination that black people experience.

While personally optimistic about their own lives, black Americans today offer a bleaker view about their community as a whole. They also express determination to try to limit Trump to a single term in office.

More than 8 in 10 black Americans say they believe Trump is a racist and that he has made racism a bigger problem in the country. Nine in 10 disapprove of his job performance overall.

The pessimism goes well beyond assessments of the president. A 65 percent majority of African Americans say it is a “bad time” to be a black person in America. That view is widely shared by clear majorities of black adults across income, generational and political lines. By contrast, 77 percent of black Americans say it is a “good time” to be a white person, with a wide majority saying white people don’t understand the discrimination faced by black Americans.


Courtney Tate, 40, an elementary school teacher in Irving, Tex., outside Dallas, said that since Trump was elected, he’s been having more conversations with his co-workers — discussions that are simultaneously enlightening and exhausting — about racial issues he and his students face everyday.


“As a black person, you’ve always seen all the racism, the microaggressions, but as white people they don't understand this is how things are going for me,” said Tate, who said he is the only black male teacher in his school. “They don’t live those experiences. They don’t live in those neighborhoods. They moved out. It’s so easy to be white and oblivious in this country.”

Francine Cartwright, a 44-year-old mother of three from Moorestown, N.J., said the ascent of Trump has altered the way she thinks about the white people in her life.

“If I’m in a room with white women, I know that 50 percent of them voted for Trump and they believe in his ideas,” said Cartwright, a university researcher. “I look at them and think, ‘How do you see me? What is my humanity to you?’ ”


The president routinely talks about how a steadily growing economy and historically low unemployment have resulted in more African Americans with jobs and the lowest jobless rate for black Americans recorded. Months ago he said, “What I’ve done for African Americans in two-and-a-half years, no president has been able to do anything like it.”


But those factors have not translated positively for the president. A 77 percent majority of black Americans say Trump deserves “only some” or “hardly any” credit for the 5.5 percent unemployment rate among black adults compared with 20 percent who say Trump deserves significant credit.

In follow-up interviews, many said former president Barack Obama deserves more credit for the improvement in the unemployment rate, which declined from a high of 16.8 percent in 2010 to 7.5 percent when he left office.

Others said their personal financial situation is more a product of their own efforts than anything the president has done.

“I don’t think [Trump] has anything to do with unemployment among African Americans,” said Ethel Smith, a 72-year-old nanny who lives in Lithonia, Ga., a suburb of Atlanta. “I’ve always been a working poor person. That’s just who I am.”



Black Americans report little change in their personal financial situations in the past few years, with 19 percent saying it has been getting better and 26 percent saying it has been getting worse. Most, 54 percent, say their financial situation has stayed the same.


A similar 56 percent majority of African Americans rate the national economy as “not so good” or “poor,” contrasting with other surveys that find most Americans overall rate the economy positively, although there are sharp political divides on this question.

Beyond questions about the economy, African Americans see a range of concerns impacting the country overall as well as their own communities.

Just 16 percent of black Americans believe that most black children born in the U.S. today have “a good opportunity to achieve a comfortable standard of living.” A 75 percent majority think most white children have such an opportunity.

More than 8 in 10 say they do not trust police in the United States to treat people of all races equally, and 7 in 10 distrust police in their own community.

Black Americans also widely sense that their experiences with discrimination are underappreciated by white Americans. Just about 2 in 10 say that most white Americans understand the level of discrimination black Americans face in their lives, while nearly 8 in 10 say they do not.


The starkly negative outlook appears to be a turnabout from previous points during both the Obama and George W. Bush presidencies, according to surveys asking related questions. A 2011 Washington Post-Kaiser Family Foundation survey found 73 percent of black women said it was a “good time” to be a black woman in America, while a similar survey in 2006 found 60 percent of black men saying it was a good time to be a black man.


Yet the Post-Ipsos poll also finds that 65 percent of black Americans say they feel optimistic about their own lives most or all of the time. This positive personal outlook crosses age and political groups, and while it peaks among those who are older and with higher incomes, roughly half of black Americans with incomes under $35,000 annually say they feel optimistic about their own lives.

Dana Clark, a father of 11 children in Ontario, Calif., said he tells all of his children that it’s possible to succeed in America, but that they’ll have to work harder than the white children they encounter.

“I tell them we’re going to set this plan up. Whatever you want to do you’re going to be able to do it,” he said. “But it ain’t going to be easy, especially if [you] want to make some money because you’re going to be in a world where they’re not going to expect you to be there. You can get what you want, but you’ve got to work harder, faster and stronger.”


The survey, by The Post and Ipsos, a nonpartisan research firm, is one of the most extensive recent surveys focused on views of the country and President Trump among black Americans, who are often represented by only small samples in customary national polls. It was conducted among 1,088 non-Hispanic black adults, including 900 registered voters, drawn from a large online survey panel recruited through random sampling of U.S. households.

Few black voters responded positively to Trump’s campaign appeal for their votes. Exit polls taken during the 2016 election showed just 8 percent of African Americans supported Trump and 89 percent backed Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton, although black turnout was significantly lower than in 2008 and 2012 for the election and reelection of Obama, the country’s first black president.


In the Post-Ipsos poll, roughly three-quarters of black adults say the things that Trump is doing as president are “bad for African Americans,” while a similar majority says Obama’s actions as president were good.


Kenneth Davis, a truck driver who lives outside Detroit, said that when Trump was elected, co-workers who secretly harbored racist thoughts felt emboldened to publicly express them.

“One gentleman is waving the Confederate flag on the back of his pickup truck,” said Davis, 48, who is a Marine Corps veteran. “He was very brave to say ‘Trump’s president, I’m going to get my window (painted).’ ”

Retired federal prison warden Keith Battle said the political climate has exposed “unresolved racial issues” and that Trump has emboldened white supremacists. Battle, who lives in Wake Forest, N.C., said white supremacists “are not the majority of whites in America, but there is a significant amount still, I’d say 30 percent, and I think they’re just leading the country down a path of, eventually, chaos. They’re feeling jeopardized of losing their white privilege.”


Survey respondents were asked to say how Trump’s presidency has affected them personally or African Americans in general. The responses illuminated the data in the poll.

“Donald Trump has not done anything for the African American people,” said one person.

“He has created an atmosphere of division and overt racism and fear of immigrants unseen in many years,” said another.

A third said, “He has taken hatred against people of color, in general, from the closet to the front porch.”

Others echoed that sentiment, saying that the president has emboldened those with racially prejudiced views and therefore set back race relations for years. “I sense a separation between myself and some of my white associates,” one person wrote.

Trump’s overall approval rating among black Americans stands at 7 percent, with 90 percent disapproving, including 75 percent who disapprove “strongly.”

Similarly large majorities of black men and women disapprove of Trump, as do black Americans across different age, education and income levels. Trump receives somewhat higher marks among self-identified black conservatives, with 25 percent approving of his performance, compared with 5 percent of moderates and 3 percent among liberals.

Few black Americans appear open to supporting Trump’s bid for reelection at this point. He receives between 4 and 5 percent support among black registered voters in head-to-head matchups against eight potential Democratic nominees. But the level of Democratic support depends on who is the party’s nominee, peaking at 82 percent for former vice president Joe Biden and falling to 57 percent for former South Bend, Ind., mayor Pete Buttigieg.

The Post-Ipsos survey was conducted Jan. 2-8, 2020, through Ipsos’s KnowledgePanel, a large online survey panel recruited through random sampling of U.S. households. Overall results have a margin of sampling error of plus or minus 3.5 percentage points among the sample of 1,088 black adults overall, and four points among the sample of 900 registered voters.

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Iris GW

By the way, an interesting take on understanding Trump's approval rating compared to other Republicans.

But among independents, Trump’s position was perhaps more telling. This group, which is typically viewed as potential swing voters, ranked Trump at the bottom of the list — statistically tied with both Palin and Pence.

https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/trump-may-be-even-more-unpopular-than-his-approval-rating-shows/

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Kathy

I hope they vote him out. They also have more obstacles at the voting precincts in states that are using other suppression in minority and Democratic areas. It will take more persistence as well as determination on their behalf.

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elvis

New Polls: Black American support for Trump

  • Rasmussen: 34.5%
  • Emerson: 34%
  • Marist: 33%

Republican strategist Deneen Borelli tweeted: “Rasmussen Poll tracking poll finds Donald Trump’s total black approval at 34%. Democrats’ worst nightmare. Boom.”

https://www.bizpacreview.com/2019/12/01/three-new-polls-trumps-approval-rating-among-black-voters-has-quadrupled-858934

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Delilah66

Interesting, dandyfopp. Thank you.

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Toby

Stop looking at numbers and start listening to what blacks have to say about Trump. It was refreshing to read their individual experiences and beliefs in their own words when what we usually hear is the brag from Trump and his supporters about how much he's done for blacks. They are wise to the fact that he hasn't really done much but is taking credit for any gains.

It's also extremely sad that we have so much further to go--65% of blacks feel that it's not a good time in America to be black.

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elvis

Toby

Stop looking at numbers and start listening to what blacks have to say about Trump...

It's also extremely sad that we have so much further to go--65% of blacks feel that it's not a good time in America to be black.

So is it 65%, or "stop looking at numbers"?

Make up your mind.

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Joaniepoanie

I think the right posting that blacks and latinos are supporting Trump in droves is just nonsense propaganda.

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cattyles

Nail on the head, Joanie.

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nancy_in_venice_ca Sunset 24 z10

joaniepoanie is correct!

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margaritadina

''While personally optimistic about their own lives, black Americans today offer a bleaker view about their community as a whole.

''

Wait ! What? A community is a conglomerate of individuals. If people are optimistic about their own lives how they can be pessimistic about the community that they constitute - the collection of optimistic about their own lives people can't constitute an unhappy community.

The author's target group is imbeciles.

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Tito Milian

900 registered Democrats

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adoptedbyhounds

"I think the right posting that blacks and latinos are supporting Trump in droves is just nonsense propaganda."

Folks on both sides of the aisle regularly share polls on this forum. We all get to put as much or as little stock in them as we see fit. Not sure what you're objecting to.

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Ziemia(6a)

^^^^ Agree that the polls don't show a positive trend for Trump.

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margaritadina

''cattyles

^^^^^^^^^

When comprehension whooshes over your head because you’re focused on a clever way to call people ‘imbeciles’.''

Please demonstrate your level of comprehension and explain how people optimistic about their lives constitute and unhappy community.

And a bonus question )))) what Trump did to the black community that is bad for them?

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Stan Areted

Yea right.

Every person of any color that I know or know of is SO MUCH MORE OPTIMISTIC about our country than those eight long dreary years under Barack Obama.

Anyone that is "deeply pessimistic" about our country now is a socialist, a democrat that is running for office, or somebody getting freebies for no good reason that is worried the gravy train is about to end.

Or, a President Trump hater.

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nancy_in_venice_ca Sunset 24 z10

Every person of color that I know or know of was adamantly opposed to Trump in 2016, and their opinion has not changed in the successive years.

Double that for those blacks who are immigrants and permanent residents or naturalized citizens.

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Ziemia(6a)

Should we all add our personal anecdotes about the people of color we know?

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Stan Areted

Ziemia:

Should we all add our personal anecdotes about the people of color we know?

Go ahead ziemia, it's of no interest to me, but if it makes you feel better, go for it.

I wouldn't know where to begin, I live where "people of color" far outnumber people "of no color." So of course I know a lot of different people.

Enclaves where people don't mix simply don't know.

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Chi

"Every person of any color that I know or know of is SO MUCH MORE OPTIMISTIC about our country than those eight long dreary years under Barack Obama."

You mean those years including and following the biggest recession our country has ever known, where many people lost their jobs and their homes? Where people were underwater with their mortgages and foreclosures were everywhere? Where layoffs were rampant and people faced lower wages and lost opportunities?

You mean people are more optimistic during a good economy than during and recovering from a massive recession? That's shocking.

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Stan Areted

Yes, thanks to President Trump.

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lily316

Come on people. Let's interview every black person we know for this thread. Let's ask them what they thought when trump said , "where's my African American?"Ask them what they think of Fox and right-wing commentators calling Michelle Obama , an ape in heels and ALL the disparaging remarks over the airwaves and on social media. Too many to begin to mention.


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Stan Areted

lily316:

Come on people. Let's interview every black person we know for this.

Good you find them.

But make sure they're the right amount of "black."

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Joaniepoanie

Well, I can tell you this....when I told a black friend last night about the other thread that claims 30%+ blacks are supporting Trump, he snorted so hard his beer went up his nose!

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Jonnygun(zone 7)

I would guess personal anecdotes would depend on the kind of people you hang around with.

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vgkg (Va Z-7)

It doesn't count until you call her up and ask her opinion of Trump, nyuk

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barncatz

About THIS survey:


...The survey, by The Post and Ipsos, a nonpartisan research firm, is one of the most extensive recent surveys focused on views of the country and President Trump among black Americans, who are often represented by only small samples in customary national polls. It was conducted among 1,088 non-Hispanic black adults, including 900 registered voters, drawn from a large online survey panel recruited through random sampling of U.S. households....

(I thought I had posted this with a comment on the other survey thread but can't locate it there now. If you spot it there, let me know. I may be skipping over it.)

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Jenn TheCaLLisComingFromInsideTheHouse(5)

Our adopted daughters are biracial, and the fact that the mister and I have to try and routinely work to prepare them for race-related things we - as white people - never had to deal with? We do it, making sure they are prepared for the fact that certain people are going to view them not as being biracial, they'd see our daughters as being...well, black - and some of those people will decide to act in a negative way towards them because of that... but we do so with heavy hearts.

They might find themselves pulled over for a traffic stop and need to be able to react to this in a way that prevents things from escalating. Young black women begin to be viewed as sexually promiscuous, deceptive, and impossible to have been a victim of sexual assault - there must be something she did, or she wanted it at the time but got mad at something done later on by the guy(s), she can't be innocent! - at a much earlier age in comparison to their white peers.

There have been incidents where just trying to go inside the building one lives in while black, have gotten police called in or another (white) resident trying to prevent that - maybe they should try and get to know who lives in the same building, or learn how to let oneself consider that it is indeed possible for a black person to live in a nice part of town and a pleasant apartment/condo community! Being on a highly respected university campus and sit down outside in a common area, while black? Campus police have just been called because another (white) student didn't think they could be a student attending that university and must be up to no good!

The mister and I can try to prepare them for this kind of stuff, and we can comfort them, be there for them, when those racial issues occur in their lives as much as possible...but we simply can't know what it's like to be a black American or a biracial American because we're white. We're probably more aware of and knowledgeable of the variety of concerns and the prejudice that the black community has faced and continues to face - in comparison to white parents of white children. The simple courtesy of asking how I can help, what they feel would be the most positive and beneficial thing and showed I was listening and supportive. We regularly seek to have conversations with other parents - both black Americans and biracial parents, and white parents - because parenting is hard enough before you throw in the challenges of being a parent to mixed race minority kids who will need to be prepared for things that white kids simply won't find themselves having to deal with.

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nancy_in_venice_ca Sunset 24 z10

I live where "people of color" far outnumber people "of no color."

So do I.

In fact, not just Los Angeles, but California too has a majority minority population.

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nancy_in_venice_ca Sunset 24 z10

I will also add that Trump has irritated the Garifuna here as well as African Americans, Ethiopians, Chinese, Japanese, Vietnamese, Filipinos, Koreans, Thais, Cambodians, Armenians, Belizeans, Guatemalans, Salvadorans, Hondurans, Mexicans, Iranians (especially those who still have family in Iran), and Indians (as in the subcontinent). Maybe some of the Hmong, Taiwanese, and Brazilians support him?

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Delilah66

"The author's target group is imbeciles."

You know that how?

"Anyone that is "deeply pessimistic" about our country now is a socialist, a democrat that is running for office, or somebody getting freebies for no good reason that is worried the gravy train is about to end."

Not me, not me, not me

"Or, a President Trump hater."

ME! I WIN!

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Stan Areted

Good, someone will send a MAGA hat! ;)

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Ziemia(6a)

This was the first recent comment that started the personal anecdotes.

in light of this, the following does confuse:

"Go ahead ziemia, it's of no interest to me, but if it makes you feel better, go for it."

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Stan Areted

No need to be confused, ziemia.

There are many such statements on this forum that are considered a "personal anecdote."

For you to suggest, as you did, "Should we all add our personal anecdotes about the people of color we know?"

was a particular question which I answered, "Go ahead ziemia, it's of no interest to me, but if it makes you feel better, go for it."


There is nothing confusing about that. If you want to give personal anecdotes, go ahead, I'm not sure why you are asking "should we all add our personal anecdotes...." That would suggest everyone should post exactly like I did in that very comment.

That would be rather, silly, don't you think, for everyone to decide to post as everyone else?

But as I said, if it makes you feel better or someone else to do that, go for it.

It's still of no interest to me.


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arthurm2015(Micro-Climate, Zone 10b Sydney, Australia)

Of course it is of no interest to you Stan, you are like my wife's relos the Ghenghis Khans.

This race stuff is of course, rubbish, go back far enough and you will find someone of colour.

The Dragon woman decided that she with a little bit of help from her daughter would track her ancestry.

What a wonderful, interesting lot she found.

A native from Chile. Described in ancestry. com as a Native American.

A convict from Ireland. Described in Australian records as a hopeless drunk.

Another Irish ancestor, raped and pillaged for the British and married into the royal family.

A Danish Seaman who jumped ship

and so on.

No one of Colour on my side, my mum was racist, at least I can give her an excuse, she left school aged 12.

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lily316

I'll ask some black women at my gym when I see them and get back to you. I'll tell them I'm doing a survey.

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watchmelol

I'll ask some black women at my gym when I see them and get back to you. I'll tell them I'm doing a survey.

Therein lies the difference. I wouldn't have to ask black people I see somewhere. I know how my black friends think whether they lean liberal, conservative or somewhere in the middle. Because I have diversity in my friendships. That is why I will never blather on about what black (or brown or yellow or red) people think. Liberals love to spout about what they think certain people think. They love to categorize people. Can't consider that within ethnic groups and racial groups there are as many different lines of political and religious beliefs as, you know, regular white people. Exhibit A: Divisiveness in action and yet they dare call conservatives on Hot Topics racist.

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margaritadina

''Delilah66

"The author's target group is imbeciles."

You know that how?
"Anyone that is "deeply pessimistic" about our country now is a socialist,''

You are so in the left field with your comment....did you even read my post??

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Chi

"I know how my black friends think"

"That is why I will never blather on about what black (or brown or yellow or red) people think. liberals love to spout about what they think certain people think."

Hmm. This seems a little contradictory to me. I dont think everyone who talks about black people in this context of poll results feels like they know the thoughts of every single black person, but rather based on their personal experiences with friends, family, co-workers, etc.

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Toby

That is why I will never blather on about what black (or brown or yellow or red) people think. liberals love to spout about what they think certain people think.

Funny, but this is exactly what bothers me when I see conservatives post about why black people vote Democrat or why they should support Trump. That's why I said we need to start listening to black people themselves, especially if your views are formed by white right wing media who tell you what black people believe and who criticize them for how they vote.

When I read these long posts on race from conservatives, I know they have very little personal experience of talking with and listening to black people because they get so much of it wrong. They still think of blacks in stereotype. Not all blacks live in poverty in the inner city. You can't write legislation that cures people of their prejudices but you can legislate policies that help people out of poverty, regardless of race. What exactly is Trump and the GOP doing to help people out of poverty? What have they done for the poor whites in Appalachia?

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Stan Areted

watchmelol:

'I'll ask some black women at my gym when I see them and get back to you. I'll tell them I'm doing a survey."

Therein lies the difference. I wouldn't have to ask black people I see somewhere. I know how my black friends think whether they lean liberal, conservative or somewhere in the middle. Because I have diversity in my friendships. That is why I will never blather on about what black (or brown or yellow or red) people think. liberals love to spout about what they thinkcertain people think. They love to categorize people. Can't consider that within ethnic groups and racial groups there are as many different lines of political and religious believes as you know, regular white people. Exhibit A: Divisiveness in action and yet they dare call conservatives on Hot Topics racist.


I agree with your words, matchmelol. Our friends--who are diverse in sexuality, religion/atheist/agnostic/something in between/ race, ethnicity, and most important to me--socioecomic groups--do not in anyway validate what I see the left's branding of them. I know straight, white 50+ year old people that would never vote for President Trump. I also know gay men over 50 that fully support Donald Trump. I know black people that are poor and those that are wealthy and both support President Trump, and I know others of the same description that do not.

I do know one thing--those with which we've broached the subject--all resent being pigeonholed and their support taken for granted because of their race/sex/religion-no religion/blue collar white collar status. It's democrats most guilty of that.

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Nana H

"all resent being pigeonholed and their support taken for granted because
of their race/sex/religion-no religion/blue collar white collar status.
It's democrats most guilty of that."

Yet it is Republicans who constantly talk of how Blacks vote against their best interests and are allowing themselves to "kept on the plantation". We have that heard that often right here, in fact by the same posters who apparently now realize that Blacks are not monolithic and resent being pigeonholed.

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Toby

One alternative to taking voter support for granted is to pander to them. Trump is doing a bang-up job of that with his uneducated white and evangelical voter base. His rallies are a yuge pander-fest to the base.

On one hand, GOPers believe that blacks shouldn't be given any special treatment, even those in poverty. On the other hand, they think that Dems (and Obama) haven't done enough for blacks, so they should vote for Trump instead. It's so contradictory.

What exactly do you think either party should do for blacks to earn their vote? What would the GOP do for them that doesn't require the special treatment that they criticize Dems for?

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Stan Areted


NanaH

"all resent being pigeonholed and their support taken for granted because
of their race/sex/religion-no religion/blue collar white collar status.
It's democrats most guilty of that."

Yet it is Republicans who constantly talk of how Blacks vote against their best interests and are allowing themselves to "kept on the plantation". We have that heard that often right here, in fact by the same posters who apparently now realize that Blacks are not monolithic and resent being pigeonholed.




I don't know of anyone that "constantly" talks about anything, much less "Republicans."

I do not recall many conservativess using the term "against their best interests" but I HAVE seen that exact term used many, many times in reference to Trump supporters, by those so arrogant as to (1) think they know what the best interests are of someone they do not even know and (2) so arrogant in mindset as to assume that someone would else vote their own interests over their principles. It's difficult to conceive with so many voting their interests over principles. Indeed, it seems to be blurred by some.

But then, it tells us a lot about demorats and the liberal mindset.

As to being "kept on the plantation" democrats have had that sewn up for decades, thanks to FDR and mainy LBJ and democrat politicians. They've kept people thinking they couldn't do for themselves and given them taxpayer money just to get by, then they become dependent on it, and they're afraid they won't make it without it, so they vote for democrats while they barely make it across many areas of their lives. However, those people are leaving in droves, and many never bought it to begin with and so have had great lives all of their lives, a fresh breath of air came in January 2017 and good winds have been blowing since. ALL AMERICANS deserve to make it on their own without a political party telling them they are victims and they need extra help or waivers because they're less. That is an insult to humans.

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Chi

Oh please, both sides generalize constantly. We all have all done it. This thread is about black pessimism and there's another active thread right now started by a trump supporter that talks about black support for Trump, and I think I saw a recent one about Hispanic support too. Are those ones claiming they know what all black and Hispanic people think too?

Common sense would dictate that no one means "every single person of whatever demographic slice I'm talking about feels that way" when speaking generally. We base our observations on our own experiences.

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Toby

Parts of the (GOP) party’s platform could resonate with minorities if it could get past perceptions of bias. Black voters are not politically homogeneous, diverging on issues including immigration, abortion rights and government spending. However, black voters tend to rally around Democrats come Election Day.

“Even when you have black conservatives who identify with the Republican Party, when it comes to Election Day, especially presidents, it comes down to the party who protects civil rights,” said Ted Johnson, senior fellow at The Brennan Center for Justice. “Every other question is by the wayside.”

Black voters across the political spectrum prioritize civil and voting rights and have long memories, Johnson says.

So therein lies the problem--the perception that Democrats protect civil rights and that Republicans do not, and Trump has only made it worse.

https://www.cnbc.com/2019/08/13/gop-faces-challenges-with-black-voters-trump-isnt-helping.html

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Jenn TheCaLLisComingFromInsideTheHouse(5)

When our two adopted daughters were first living with us, they were foster placements, and it wasn't even a full two weeks before the eldest of the two had another student in her 4th grade class singling her out to bully not just because she was a 'foster kid' but also because she was biracial and doesn't look like the other kids at school as a result. It started during lunch and continued once the students returned to the classroom for the remainder of the day. This kid felt emboldened enough to announce to a large group of children and then again once everyone was back in the classroom that she 'doesn't belong here'. At that age, I know that it had to be something they'd learned from the adults around them at home. All I can do is try to protect my children and hope that this country has more individuals who aren't so small minded and prejudiced than people who *are*.

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