Next week's Arctic blast expected to break 170 records across US

dublinbay z6 (KS)

Just a word of warning. Everyone ready for this extreme swing in the temperatures? Don't want to have to go out in the cold to get a missing loaf of bread, after all!

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"This week's cold snap is only an appetizer compared with the main Arctic blast that's coming next week, meteorologists said. That freeze could be one for the record books.

"The National Weather Service is forecasting 170 potential daily record cold high temperatures Monday to Wednesday,” tweeted Weather Channel meteorologist Jonathan Erdman. "A little taste of January in November."

The temperature nosedive will be a three-day process as a cold front charges across the central and eastern U.S. from Sunday into Tuesday.

The front will plunge quickly through the northern Plains and upper Midwest Sunday, into the southern Plains and Ohio Valley Monday, then through most of the East Coast and Deep South by Tuesday, the Weather Channel said.

. . . It could be the coldest Veterans Day on record in cities such as Chicago and Minneapolis. . . .

By Tuesday, . . . [h]ighs may get only into the 30s as far south as Alabama.

. . . The most intense cold will be in the northern Plains where temperatures may fall below zero"

https://www.yahoo.com/news/next-weeks-arctic-blast-cold-113051061.html

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I guess in this case, this post is not a "hot topic" so much as it qualifies as a "cold topic." : )

Keep warm everybody.

Looks like only the West and Southwest will escape this one.

Kate

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queenmargo

Keep warm everybody.

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dublinbay z6 (KS)

Here's another one:

Kate

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maifleur01

Our local NWS night people post interesting observations when they can. This mornings was "The low this morning at KC was 17...that was the coldest we've been since March 6th when the low bottomed out at 7 degrees. That is a span of 247 days...the average span between the last 20 degree in the Spring and the first in the Fall is 259 days. A little early." Currently their forecast is for 12F Monday night. I am hoping this is not a repeat of the year in the early 1980s when my stepson came to live with us for a while. First couple of weeks of December were below zero every night. Only thing good about that was when you puffed air out you could hear the ice crystals hitting each other making music.

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vgkg Z-7 Va(Z-7)

I'll be picking all of our green tomatoes today, can't recall the last time we had tomatoes in October much less November. Don't forgot to close your crawl space vents.

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vedabeeps


It’s a good time for some of you to visit beautiful blue skied Southern California. You’ll find us having bbq and cocktails by a friends pool.



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queenmargo

It’s a good time for some of you to visit beautiful blue skied Southern California. You’ll find us having bbq and cocktails by a friends pool.

:))))))

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Carro

Get you plants in or protected!

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althea_gw

First thing this morning I read this: https://www.mprnews.org/story/2019/11/07/why-is-minnesota-one-of-the-coldest-places-in-a-warming-earth

And now find out it's just the beginning of far worse to come. Luckily someone just gave me 5 Icelandic sheep fleeces to spin.

Keep warm.




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queenmargo

Unhook your hoses, cover the faucets, and shut off the water.

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Carro

Good reminder, margo. Take care of your pipes now.

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nancy_in_venice_ca Sunset 24 z10

What Veda wrote!

We had a few days of fall weather, and now we're back to summer temperatures.

.

Covering your faucets -- what's that?

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LoneJack Zn 6a, KC

It was November 10 last year when an arctic blast came through and dropped the termp to 8F here in the morning. This year it will a 2 days later.

It was 21 when I got to work this morning at 5:30 but I think it dropped a few degrees more.

Open the cabinet doors under any sink that is on an outside wall to allow warm air in. Leave the faucets dripping if it will get sub zero.

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dublinbay z6 (KS)

Thanx for the hose reminder. Forgot all about it!

Kate

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elvis

19F here, we've been ready for awhile. It is November!

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Chi

We had a teaser last week in California but it's warm again. I like when it gets chilly (California chilly) but I don't envy people about to be Arctic blasted. Stay warm!

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adoptedbyhounds

What a great hint, lone jack! Thank you.

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woodnymph2_gw

It's even going to get cold down here in the Carolinas. Usually fall is the best time of the year here in the low country. We have oranges on our tree but I wonder if they will survive a freeze.

What is maddening is that so many climate change deniers will use this as an excuse to argue that global warming is a myth.

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chase_gw

Not gong to be a happy camper coming home to this! Time to start thinking Florida!!!!

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lily316

No autumn here at all. 75 a week ago when I walked the dog sweating in the humidity and 32 the next night. The arctic blast will take us in the teens next week. I brought ten outdoor plants to my basement greenhouse...six lantana's, three Norfolk pines and a huge fern.

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chisue

We had 6" of snow on Halloween. Then a warm-up. Yesterday was 36/20. We're to have a little warm-up until Sunday, then BAM! We haven't had color from our pear trees in three years. (North of Chicago along Lake Michigan)

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roxanna7

Here in Massachusetts, my very large indoor plant shelves are already full -- of alstroemeria, evolvulous, amaryllis, clivia and assorted other plants. Under lights, and next to the kitchen for ease of watering. The unheated garage is full of potted daffs and tulips. All set for the next 5 1/2 months.

I am not looking forward to the coming temperatures!

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maifleur01

Couple of small suggestions. If you use moist cat food and store it in a cupboard near the wall while it should not freeze cats can have difficulty eating it especially older cats. When we lived in the old house with lots of drafts putting incandescent lights in the area where the water pipes ran up the outside wall kept them from freezing most of the time. If you can afford to do so there are outside hose faucets that actually turn off inside. They look and operate like any other hose faucet but the off and on area is inside the house.

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nancy_in_venice_ca Sunset 24 z10

alstroemeria, amaryllis, clivia

These plants are always outside; the alstroemeria and clivia are in the ground.

I can't imagine having to house yard plants indoors for months at a time.

otoh, I can't grow anything that requires cold winter weather. No peonies, no tulips, no crocus, and the list goes on.

Edited to add: If I had to bring indoors all the bromeliads, begonias, fuchsias, and ferns on the patio and deck, there would be no room for me. That would be one way to solve my plant addiction.

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JodiK

And, lest we forget... let's not confuse weather with climate. Global Warming is still a viable thing, regardless of a cold snap.

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roxsol

Just install a freeze resistant outdoor faucet then one doesn’t have to worry about shutting anything off.

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HamiltonGardener

Althea,


hate to to tell you this but those aren’t Icelandic Sheep!!!


;-D



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kadefol

I hope people will remember they are cold when we are cold, and bring their pets indoors.

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althea_gw

Well, heck HamiltonGardener. No wonder they were such a pain to shear! :)

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Moxie

Well, it is November. One of the reasons I moved to Minnesota long ago is that summer here is almost short enough.

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catkinZ8a



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miss lindsey (stillmissesSophie)doineedtoaddanamehere(8a)

I keep checking the forecast hoping we will be in that arctic blast here in the PNW; would rather see snow than the forecasted rain. Nope, highs mid 50s lows mid 40s.

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JodiK

There was about an inch of ice on water buckets today... inside the barn, and outside of course. Everyone is bedded well, and they've been fed as is appropriate for the season. They'll spend the night digesting, using the extra energy provided by their feed to keep warm.

However, when we're feeling chilly, most animals are not, having naturally higher body temperatures, not to mention fur coats that have grown underfur for the winter ahead.

A goat's normal body temperature is about 103 degrees F, a dog's is 101 degrees F, and so on... so, they're not as cold as we think they are.

In the case of goats, which are closely related to deer, their hairs are hollow... which helps keep them warm and dry in rain and snow. My goats can be found out in pasture during rain or snowfall, often foraging for whatever they can find. They are not uncomfortable... or they would be huddled within their shelters or inside the barn.

Ready for winter? I'm not... but my animals are.

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kadefol

^^ that may apply to chilly weather, but whenever there are extreme cold snaps, there are also news reports of pets freezing to death or sustaining frost bite injuries.

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barncatz

The temp here was around 30 but the wind was whipping. I carried some hay out of the barn to the feeders in the early afternoon and the horses dutifully followed me out of the barn, but then turned and went back into their stalls.

I always feel bad for the horses out in that cold, wind driven rain that is getting more common during our winters.

Thanks for the hose reminder!

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socks(10a)

Jack, could pipes still freeze if faucet dripping? Good suggestion about cupboards.

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terrene(5b MA)

It barely got above freezing today in metro Boston and I am just thrilled to hear that polar air is coming to a theater near here soon (NOT).

Just finished planting the last dozen garlic cloves yesterday - Music - maybe a little late for this fall's weather? And we still have 1 side of the house to paint.

Was hoping for a bit more temperate weather in November. Ugh.

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miss lindsey (stillmissesSophie)doineedtoaddanamehere(8a)

socks, I’m not Jack but in case s/he doesn’t see your question, yes pipes can still freeze with water dripping. But they are less likely to so it’s worth it to do if you’re going to get unusually cold weather for your area. If you do occasionally get that degree of coldness and you haven’t had a problem before, you are probably safe.

It all depends on the amount of insulation in your house, the depth to which your incoming line is buried, the low temp.

In our little old trailer my wonderful Husband used to wake up every hour or so and crawl under to use a blow drier to keep the lines from freezing in the very coldest weather, even with the water left at a slow trickle. Thankfully we are beyond that now :)

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ohiomom

Well I for one am not looking forward to freezing temps ... but I do know how to layer when I walk and will be warm and toasty by the time I get back to my space. This weekend will be November-like so I will run all my errands and pick up what is needed (not much really).


Winter is always followed by Spring, so we do have that to look forward to (^_^)

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miss lindsey (stillmissesSophie)doineedtoaddanamehere(8a)

“There’s no bad weather, only bad clothes!”

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batyabeth

very unusual but here we've got 90 degrees all week and it really shouldn't be this hot now. No rain either, which we need desperately.

Feet , hands and head: keep 'em dry! I grew up in Chicago and remember well dressing like an onion.

Althea, I'm so jealous...........

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JodiK

Yes, frostbite can happen... that's why it's essential to ensure enough of the proper feeds, and shelter from the harsh, frigid winds. Plenty of dry bedding also helps more than one might think.

I also ensure the barn remains warmer and less drafty by stacking all the hay on the side of the barn that takes the brunt of prevailing winds and snow. This gives it an extra layer of insulation, if you like, against those frigid winds.

My goats tend to share body warmth, cuddling together in their stalls... and it's not unusual to find a few barn cats snuggled in with a goat. The guard dog also sleeps with the goats.

Any pets that are used to inside conditions remain inside the house.

As much as I'd like to, I just can't bring my whole herd inside for the winter! ;-)


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lily316

Well, apparently I'm the only one loving this. I hate summer with a passion and am heading out for my weekly hike on the Appalachian trail in cold weather instead of the months of sweaty humid '90s. It's 40 now but was 21 last night. I can wear long pants so I don't have poison ivy, ticks, mosquitoes and other nasties invading my body. I will relish these months and look with dread the return of summer. We have only two seasons here. Summer and winter and no spring or fall. Witness the fact a week ago I was sweating in 75 degree temps the 95% humidity.

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roxsol

oh lily, I’m with you!

I love winter. I love the cool fresh air. Today, it is minus 15c. and I’m going out for a good , long walk.

My horses have grown their winter coats and really enjoy the weather, as long as the wind doesn’t pick up. Horses are fine without a barn but they do a need a windbreak. They don’t like wind, summer or winter, simply because it distorts their hearing and they can’t sense danger.

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JodiK

We have the barn with its several stalls, each large enough for several goats with room to spare, but we find that some of our goats will choose the calf hutches we have lined up, or the three sided loafing sheds positioned within the pasture areas. All are aligned with south facing openings.

Each pasture area has at least one shed, more than spacious enough for the amount of animals within that area.

Even the aviary gets a makeover for cold weather, with tarps and stacked rain hay or straw bales to help stop any wind. Smaller poultry, like the quail, spend winters in the basement in appropriate cages.

The diets go from a summer feeding program, to one that adds more protein and some sugars for added energy necessary to cold weather.

To make things a bit easier, we employ rubber buckets and other water receptacles, and feed pans so that there's no cracking due to ice and the expansion that happens as things freeze. It's a lot easier to upturn a bucket and stand on it so the ice lets go without ruining the bucket. And since goats can be kind of destructive, the rubber buckets last a lot longer!

Unfortunately, I despise cold weather... it plays havoc on my bones and joints, and especially my spine. It's not pleasurable for asthma, either... going from warm to cold. But, we work together, Old Guy and I, and in no time our chores are done... and everyone is safely tucked in for the night! :-)

~~~

When there used to be several horses, here, the barn was theirs at night... and especially during the winter months. Of course, we didn't have the herd of goats at the time. There was just the one goat as a companion to one of the horses.

The horses were sold off long ago... and in came the goats. The goats help to make us a living, and the horses were more for pleasure, but as we all aged... it wasn't fair that no one rode them, or could manage some of the work involved. I find goats to be much easier to work with, and exceedingly interesting to watch as a herd. Very interesting creatures... affectionate, sweet, each with its own personality.

Anyway... time to make the donuts! :-)

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jama7(6)

(Horses) They don’t like wind, summer or winter simply because it distorts their hearing and they can’t sense danger.

Maybe that's DH's prob with wind...he can't sense danger! LOL. He HATES IT.

Yeah, horses just turn their butts to the wind. Our's were free to come and go into the pole barn but it took some really nasty weather for them to go in.

I miss our horses but I don't miss mucking out and breaking ice in 10 deg in a nice strong wind.

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elvis

Smaller poultry, like the quail, spend winters in the basement in appropriate cages.

So jodik, you've written many, many times over the years about your situation living on a hobby farm as caretakers, and as dog breeders. Because of your many narratives, us long-timers remain interested. Your mention of quail is something new, though. Is this a game farm you are working at now? Just curious, as you sometimes give us great detail of the animals you are looking after.

Here's hoping you and those critters in your care are staying warm.

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roxsol

Off topic, but the mention of quail reminded me of this.

I have a wee little 15 pound dog that brought this freshly caught ruffed grouse to my door last week.


He’s a real Nimrod!

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miss lindsey (stillmissesSophie)doineedtoaddanamehere(8a)

Wow roxsol that’s one mighty little hunter! (Hope you ate the grouse? My dad used to hunt partridge and I really enjoyed them but hated having to watch for shot in the meat. Husband/b-i-l’s don’t hunt birds. ETA and our dog only brings me RATS, blech.)

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roxsol

miss lindsey, my little Frank digs pocket gophers out of their burrows all the time. He’d probably catch rats as well but Alberta is supposedly rat free. This was his catch earlier this year:

I wish he would go back to just eating horse poop.

eta The ruffed grouse went into the green bin:(

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ubro(2a)

I love winter. I love the cool fresh air. Today, it is minus 15c. and I’m going out for a good , long walk.

I am with you on this, I don't say it out loud because most people don't agree with me, I usually keep it to myself.

It helps to have a friend to use as a blanket ;), my cats spend most winter days


on top of their heated cat house. They only go inside at night.



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elvis

Ah yes. Outdoor cats, great way to make sure the bird population is kept in check, right?

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Carro


elvis

Ah yes. Outdoor cats, great way to make sure the bird population is kept in check, right?

:-(

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jerzeegirl(9b)

I thought she meant that the cats went into the cat house at night.

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elvis

Oh, well if they're outside at night, they can take care of those pesky bats, too!

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roxsol

elvis, I think ubro said her cats go inside their heated cat house at night. No bats in there, I hope :)

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elvis

roxsol, why would an indoor cat house be heated? It sounds like the heated cat house is outside the people house, i.e., out there in nature with the birds and the bats. Huntin' time.

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roxsol

roxsol, why would an indoor cat house be heated?

I have no idea, elvis. I have never owned a cat so I don’t know what their needs are. My late mother-in-law had a Chihuahua that slept indoors on a heating pad year round.

Maybe ubro’s cats are barn cats and fill up on mice. That would be good news for the birds and bats but not so good for the mice :)

eta ubro, where is that darn cat house located?

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cattyles

I like mice better than birds, so I train mine to be bird killers. ;-)

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roxsol

My windows are bird killers:(

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miss lindsey (stillmissesSophie)doineedtoaddanamehere(8a)

My cats are rat killers. I figure the odd bird they catch once in a blue moon is more than offset by their daily haul of rats, mice, and moles.

It’s nature’s way and sometimes even wild populations need to be culled of weak or sick animals.

All our cats are outside all the time. They all come to us as strays and any that we can tame get spayed or neutered and fed daily, kittens get sent to responsible homes if we can get close to them. These ones stay pretty close to home; currently we have three “porch cats.” The ones that stay in the barns come and go, don’t live as long, wander off, get hit by vehicles. We can’t save them all and that has to be ok.

We have tons of songbirds, sparrrows, jays, woodpeckers, ravens, owls, bald eagles, frogs, bats. The cats don’t even look at the baby chickens that wander over everyday. They know that’s not food.

I think leaving some wild in every yard and garden is just as important if not more so than keeping cats inside, for the health of the bird population.

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terrene(5b MA)

Outdoor cats, great way to make sure the bird population is kept in check, right?

Obviously, outdoor dogs are also killers of birds. In fact, the mere presence of dogs in a natural area is enough for wildlife parents to abandon a nest or fawn, and the offspring will die.

Cats do kills many birds, but they kill many more mice, moles, voles, chipmunks, etc. which cause much destruction to structures, landscapes, and gardens, and none of which are endangered species.

And windows, and other man-made structures. They kill somewhere around a billion birds every year in the US.



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terrene(5b MA)

Roxsol, you can get window decals that will help to warn the birds of the presence of the glass. I have grids in my windows, they work pretty well too.

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roxsol

Indoor dogs are bird killers, too!

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miss lindsey (stillmissesSophie)doineedtoaddanamehere(8a)

My auntie had a cute little suction-cup bird feeder that stuck to the outside of her window. The birds saw the food and slowed down to land and feed and were saved from smashing into the glass. Cute and clever, I thought.

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roxsol

terrene, I have six picture windows across the back of my house and one large one in front. No curtains. I have tried decals and hangy things. There is a certain time of the year, when the sun is at a certain height and the birds just keep slamming into them.

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JodiK

Elvis, Old Guy and I have worked as a team in so many capacities, using so many skill sets, I can't even begin to accurately describe them all. We've each lived lives that have taken us through many experiences... most that your average person doesn't get a chance to do... including college, seminars, trade school, and other modes of education, including hands on.

What you seem to do whenever quizzing me is forget that we're talking about a very long time frame... decades of various interests and work combined... so while we bred canines and had our day in the sun in that capacity, it happened during an earlier decade. We never bred dogs while on the farm. You can see our dogs and read about them on the pages of several books, however.

We retired from that, and moved on... to something completely different. That doesn't mean, however, that we lose knowledge of one type when we begin another phase of our lives.

Let's see... among other things, we created a working factory from what had been an empty building at the behest of someone we knew. We've done so many jobs... jobs that don't seem like jobs to us because we are fortunate enough to work together.

And so it went... until we were asked to help care take an estate that our aging family member could no longer manage alone. And we've been here ever since.

My mention of quail is not new by any stretch... it entered the picture about the same time, or shortly after other animals began to make an appearance. And in case you were curious, quail eggs are exceptionally nutritious! We also have ducks, and several types of chickens. Duck eggs are very rich in flavor.

This is far from what you term a "hobby" farm. It's a small working farm that keeps us healthy, mobile, and far enough away from society, or the 'social condition' that we don't care to be a part of.

We're able to set our own schedule, which helps us manage specific health issues... except where seasonal work needs to be done. But we have help for certain jobs, and friends that we trade for labor.

Why you're suddenly so curious about the life of someone you clearly don't care for, I'm sure I don't know... but whatever smokes a person's shorts, I suppose.

I love living out in the middle of nowhere, growing, raising and hunting the food items we need... being able to step outside and see wildlife that wouldn't normally be viewed elsewhere, with regard to cities and suburbia... providing extra habitat for the many birds and other beneficial creatures that call this area home.

Every day brings something new... and that's something I enjoy very much.

I just don't care for the coldest parts of winter... which bring their own set of issues that have to be tackled. But... it is what it is, and I wouldn't trade this life for any other... unless it came with a new skeleton without pain!

~~~

Jama, that's one thing I could do without... mucking stalls! Goats are notoriously messy creatures... although I do love having them!

Instead of ear tags or numbers, they are each given a name at birth, and as they grow into young adulthood, they get a collar to wear. It makes it easier to handle them when they require milking, or they need an occasional hoof trim or treatment.

~~~

As for outdoor cats... they not only keep our outbuildings free from rodents, but they also help take care of any weaker birds or rabbits that wouldn't make it through the winters. It may even be that not all my barn cats will make it through the seasons. That's just life.

Life of every kind is a cycle. The weak and/or ill get picked off by predators, which helps keep the rest of those populations healthy. And nature even provides scavengers to aid in cleanup.

It's not always kind or pretty... but it's how our world works. It's simply something that I have to accept... I don't always have to like it... but I have to accept it.

And, again... time to get my chores started! Have a nice evening!




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ubro(2a)

Maybe ubro’s cats are barn cats and fill up on mice. That would be good news for the birds and bats but not so good for the mice :)

eta ubro, where is that darn cat house located?

Sorry, for some reason I missed coming back to this topic page. My heated cat house is on our screened in deck. Yes, these are outside farm cats and the service they do, keeping the mice out of our barns and my greenhouse is valuable. elvis

Ah yes. Outdoor cats, great way to make sure the bird population is kept in check, right?


Not every person lives the same, quite frankly cats on the farm have a purpose and I am not keeping them locked up in the house when they have acres and acres to roam and hunt.

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roxsol

ubro, my SIL says that farm cats are invaluable to them. They keep the mice from ruining their stored cattle feed.

She does have a gripe with the squirrels that ruin the nests and eat the eggs of wild birds, though.

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catspat(aka)

Every outbuilding on my grandparents' ranch had a cat door cut into the door so that the cats could go in and out for mouse control. The hay barns were the biggest mouse attraction. One particularly good mouser ("Joey", a fuzzy black tomcat) we all admired used to catch so many there that he couldn't eat all he caught and would line his catches up on top of a hay bale. I remember seeing seven once.

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JodiK

On the farm, there are plenty of places to curl up and stay warm in inclement weather... the hay mow, straw mow, or in with the goats, themselves.

And not only do they hunt for part of their protein, I also make sure there are kitty pans filled with kibble in each building... just in case... along with a bucket of fresh water.

There are cat sized openings in every building... the barn, the garages... they can get in anywhere they like, whether to hunt or find a spot to nap.

Our barn is very old, with the kind of timbers that you just don't find anymore. The majority of it has dirt floors, which makes it better for me... after clean out, I spread a bit of barn lime and add a tad of DE to keep out any ants or other insects. Add fresh bedding, and it's ready for its occupant.

~~~

Only my indoor cat brings me her mice catches. They're nice gifts... don't get me wrong... I appreciate each and every one. But in my shoe? Really? Must she?

She apparently likes to play with them before dispatching them, and I suppose a shoe is as good as any place to stuff them so she can reach in and play with them. I just wish she'd hint it was in there before I tried to put it on! LOL!

There's just nothing quite like placing your toes into a boot, only to find that the obstruction is actually a deceased mouse!

Ah, well... it's one less live one in the house!

~~~

I sure wish my barn cats would go after more moles... we have some of the most gigantic, destructive moles I've ever come across... and even though I know cats don't eat them, they could at least kill a few for me! But, no...


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Lars(Z11a, Sunset 24)

As for plants, I bring my phaleonopsis orchids inside when the temperature gets below 50°, but that hasn't happened yet. Sometimes I brink cattleya orchids, but most stay outdoors all winter. Normally I do not bring plants indoors until December, and then only a handful, which are reasonably small. My favorite cattleya orchid is blooming right now,


and so I bring it indoors in the evening so that I can appreciate the flowers, but I put it back outdoors in the morning, so that it can get the light it needs. The phaleonopsis don't need all that much light, and so I leave them indoors in the winter.

Cymbidiums bloom in the winter, and they stay outdoors all year, as they are cold hardy - at least to 40°, and so they are in no danger here. Plus they are way too big to bring indoors.

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cattyles

That’s beautiful, Lars.

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haydayhayday

Bring it on!

I love cold. I can always put on more clothing.

My most favorite month is February. Quiet, serene, peaceful. No bugs. No mud.

And the bears are asleep!


That's last year. Right outside the window I'm sitting next to right this moment

He's got two in his mouth. Two of those 33 gallon plastic garbage bags that I use to bag up dry leaves in the fall and place around the edge of my house to keep the cold air out of my crawl space.

Where do you think the bear got the idea that there could be some goodies in a black plastic garbage bag?


Bears have gotten to a real nuisance around my house. I can't compost any more. I can't even leave a bag of dry leaves sitting out around my house! I bagged up about 30 bags of dry leaves the other day.

The local bear ripped apart about half of them.


Hay


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cattyles

I’m another winter lover. I hate the endless heat of summer.

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nancy_in_venice_ca Sunset 24 z10

In my stretch of coastal SoCal, we can go for weeks and weeks with high temperatures between 68 - 72 in spring.

May gray, and June gloom -- me and my begonias are exceedingly happy.

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HamiltonGardener

I’m just out shoveling now. Hamilton is expecting to see 30 cm of snow tonight.


Winter wonderland, which is great for a bit. Then I get sick of the snow and start checking flights to Spain!!!

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JodiK

I guess that as kids, most of us probably liked winter... playing in the fresh snow, sledding, ice skating, snowball fights, all sorts of winter fun... and the promise of Christmas just around the corner.

As an adult, I hate it. It means cold, more work, more that can go wrong in freezing temperatures, and having to double layers of clothing to brave the winds and deep snow, the ice of winter... and the commercialism of Christmas, if one participates in all that.

I suppose it wouldn't be all that bad if the commercial world didn't try so hard to rush the holidays, pushing them all together in stores, with one barely passing before the next is advertised. It's gotten to the point where we don't even celebrate holidays... unless we're able to visit with the grandkids. That's who holidays are for... children, and their happiness!

~~~

It looks deceptively nice out this morning... the sun is shining. But I know it's cold out there, and shortly I'll be headed out, to walk the dog and check on everyone.

Pretty soon, I should be able to look out my window and see the goats in pasture, pawing through the snow layer to get at the dried grasses they like. Or, they'll be laying in the sun, catching whatever warmth it has to offer.

In the meantime, guzzling hot coffee is where it's at... waiting for various medicines to take effect... and deciding whether I want toast with freshly made apple butter, or nothing at all because food in the morning is really not my thing, although I know I should put something in my stomach.

~~~

Yeah... you can have the snow and cold. I much prefer warm weather, and so do my bones! I wonder which building I left the snow shovel in last year? Will it be with the garden tools? Or did I put it in the barn with my grain shovels and pitchforks? I don't think I used it more than once last year... we just didn't get that much snow.

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foodonastump

Just picked up the boards from being tuned. Enough with raking leaves, give me some snow!


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miss lindsey (stillmissesSophie)doineedtoaddanamehere(8a)

FOAS I never got into snowboarding so I have to ask: what does “tuning” a board involve?

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foodonastump

Most to a 440 A, though the little one at the bottom of the pile to B flat.

(just sharpen the edges and wax the bottom. Something I should just do myself but it’s easier to drop off and pick up.)

p.s. The answer to your user name is yes. Someone’s on a mission.

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miss lindsey (stillmissesSophie)doineedtoaddanamehere(8a)

Re: your ps, is there anything that can be done?

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ubro(2a)

Enough with raking leaves, and enough with mowing the lawn and weeding the garden. It can't get cold quick enough for me, I hate this middle of the road weather, too icy for me.

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HamiltonGardener

Hubby has some good things about the weather. He got to buy a new snow blower today. It's a new toy.

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althea_gw

I mostly skipped raking leaves this Fall, just clearing the sidewalks and a small area of lawn. Yards look really nice covered in colorful leaves. Even brown leaves are an interesting change from green. The yard will be white tomorrow. I still haven't recovered from show shoveling every other day from Feb. - April of this year.

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JodiK

I never do yard or garden cleanup in fall... I leave everything so it can act as added insulation for any root systems that require it. Plus, it can provide food or habitat for the little critters that stick around through the winters. Spring is when I begin clearing the gardens for new plantings.

And by allowing native plants and trees to take over, I've noticed a lot more colorful song birds during the warmer months, not to mention more butterflies and other pollinators.

~~~

Yep, it was so cold that every water bucket was frozen solid and had to be stomped on to remove the ice blocks that formed overnight. Thank goodness we have plenty of rubber buckets, pans and troughs!



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