List of impeachable offenses

Eat Well

https://www.needtoimpeach.com/impeachable-offenses/


1. Obstructing justice

  • The trail of evidence starts with Trump’s attempt to get James Comey, the FBI director responsible for overseeing the investigation into Trump’s relationship with Russia during the 2016 election, to drop an investigation into National Security Advisor Michael Flynn.
  • When Comey refused, Trump fired him.
  • Trump made two more attempts at stopping the investigation by trying (unsuccessfully) to fire Robert Mueller, Comey’s predecessor. Then, Trump ordered White House Counsel Don McGahn to create a false record indicating that no attempts took place – McGahn refused.
  • Trump has repeatedly attempted to intimidate or influence witnesses in proceedings against him.
  • In all, Robert Mueller’s investigation revealed multiple instances where there was “very substantial” evidence that Trump had committed obstruction of justice.
  • Read more about Donald Trump’s obstruction here.

2. Profiting from the presidency

  • The Constitution’s Foreign Emoluments Clause prohibits the president from accepting personal benefits from any foreign government or official.

  • Trump has retained his ownership interests in his family business while he is in office.

  • Thus, every time a foreign official stays at a Trump hotel, or a foreign government approves a new Trump Organization project, or grants a trademark, Trump is in violation of the Constitution.

  • Trump has repeatedly pushed his properties as avenues to secure his favor, and multiple foreign officials have stayed at his properties while lobbying his administration.

  • Trump attempted to promote his club in Doral Florida for the 2020 G-7 Conference.

  • And every time he goes to golf at a Trump property, he funnels taxpayer money into his family business—violating the Domestic Emoluments Clause.

3. Collusion

  • In the middle of the 2016 election, Trump’s son was invited to meet with a Russian national regarding “information that would incriminate Hillary and…would be very useful to” Donald Trump. Donald Trump Jr. was told it was “part of Russia and its government’s support for Mr. Trump.” Trump Jr., Jared Kushner, and Campaign Chairman Paul Manafort took the meeting.
  • Federal law prohibits campaigns from soliciting or accepting anything of value from a foreign national.
  • Paul Manafort and Rick Gates met with Konstantin Kilimink, likely a Russian spy, multiple times in the summer of 2016 to provide him with internal campaign polling data detailing the Trump campaign’s midwestern strategy. Manafort lied about these meetings to the FBI even after pleading guilty to other crimes.
  • This relationship between the Trump team and multiple Russian nationals raises questions of whether the campaign aided a hostile foreign power’s active operation against the United States.
SaveComment26Like8
Comments (26)
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Eat Well

4. Advocating Political and Police Violence

  • When Trump gave cover to the neo-Nazis who rioted in Charlottesville and murdered a protester, he violated his obligation to protect the citizenry against domestic violence.
  • When Trump encouraged police officers to rough up people they have under arrest, he violated his obligation to oversee faithful execution of the laws.
  • Trump and his rhetoric have been cited in numerous criminal proceedings as being the inspiration and justification for political violence.
  • When faced with impeachment in the House, Trump has alluded to his supporters engaging in insurrection to keep him in power – a rallying cry readily picked up by his supporters.
5 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Eat Well

5. Abuse of Power

  • President Trump threatened to withhold aid from Ukraine if its Prime Minister did not investigate former Vice President Joe Biden and his son. Using taxpayer dollars to manipulate an important ally against Russia and attack a political rival is a clear abuse of presidential power.
  • Furthermore, this administration tried to conceal the whistleblower complaint that brought this corruption to light and label the civil servant who filed it as partisan.
  • In addition, Trump’s decision to pardon Joe Arpaio, who was convicted for contempt of court after ignoring a court order that he stop detaining and searching people based on the color of their skin, amounted to an abuse of the pardon power that revealed his indifference to individual rights, equal protections, and the separation of powers.
  • Pardoning this conviction goes against the Fifth Amendment, which allows the judiciary to issue and enforce injunctions against government officials who flout individual rights.
5 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Eat Well

6. Engaging in Reckless Conduct

  • High-ranking administration officials involved in foreign affairs have signaled that Trump does not have the capacity to make informed decisions in the event of a military crisis.
  • Even worse, his actions could spark a needless confrontation stemming from misunderstanding or miscalculation.
  • We see this in full effect every time Trump tweets or makes a public statement taunting and threatening the North Korean regime.
  • The president may be the “Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States,” but that does not give him the right to behave in reckless or wanton ways that put millions of lives at risk.
  • If he is unfit to perform his duties as Commander in Chief, he cannot be allowed to remain in the position.
5 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Eat Well

7. Persecuting Political Opponents

  • President Trump has repeatedly pressured the Department of Justice and the FBI to investigate and prosecute political adversaries like Hillary Clinton; now, the DOJ has reopened the Clinton email investigation in an attempt to scandalize his opponents.
  • This is not based in concerns with national security, law enforcement, or any other function of his office—it is an attempted power play, plain and simple.
  • Trump also pressured the Ukrainian government to investigate Joe Biden, his potential opponent in the general election, by leveraging US military aide to help his reelection prospects.
  • Trump and Attorney General Barr have asked foreign intelligence agencies to assist in an investigation to discredit Robert Mueller, hoping to undermine the credibility of the damning Mueller Report.
  • There’s no question that these actions constitute an outrageous and inappropriate abuse of executive branch powers and serve as clear grounds for impeachment.
5 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Eat Well

8. Attacking the Free Press

  • President Trump has repeatedly attacked the concept of an independent press.
  • He’s called critical coverage “fake news” and journalists “the enemy of the American people,” made threats to change libel laws and revoke licenses, andhis battles with CNN led him to try to interfere in the AT&T/Time Warner merger.
  • His Administration has repeatedly and baselessly revoked press credentials for critical coverage.
  • He has dismissed the murder of a critical journalist, citing the economic partnership the US has with the offending nation.
  • This demonstrates his unwillingness to respect and uphold the Constitution, and disdain for the crucial foundations to our free society.
4 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Zalco/bring back Sophie!

Here is New York Magazine's Andrew Sullivan on impeachment:

Alexander Hamilton’s core contribution to the impeachment question in the Federalist Papers comes immediately to mind. He sees our core threat, tyranny, as foretold by Plato and Aristotle: “Of those men who have overturned the liberties of republics, the greatest number have begun their career by paying an obsequious court to the people; commencing demagogues, and ending tyrants.” And he echoes the Founders’ obsession with what George Washington called “the insidious wiles of foreign influence.” Those two core concerns were fused in Hamilton’s impeachment remedy; and they capture the Trump administration with pinpoint accuracy. No previous impeachment — not Johnson nor Nixon nor Clinton — comes close to being as constitutionally merited as this one.

You could argue that foreign influence is not what it was, and that this weakens the current case. In the late 18th century, the U.S. was a fledgling republic, easily manipulated by great powers like Britain and France. But the internet has empowered foreign governments in manipulating U.S. public opinion, and globalism has effectively subjected much of the U.S. economy to the influence of the techno-communists in Beijing. Foreign influence is back, baby, and more relevant than ever. You could also argue, I suppose, that “abuse of power” is not an impeachable “crime” (as the neck-free former acting attorney general, Matthew Whitaker, told Laura Ingraham), or that Trump could shoot Joe Biden dead in a debate and still be immune from prosecution while in office, as the president’s lawyer, William Consovoy, baldly claimed this week.

But that these extreme arguments are being aired at all is proof of the weakness of the president’s underlying constitutional position. So too are thuggish stunts like the 2000 Brooks Brothers riot rerun in Adam Schiff’s SCIF. Ditto Lindsey Graham’s absurd and mendacious pretense that a House impeachment inquiry is the same as a Senate trial, and should always be public, with Trump capable of self-defense. Butters — as I have long called Graham — is a laughable, pathetic, lying fool. The truth is: The GOP’s got nothing to work with. This should be over already — and yet the president still enjoys overwhelming support from his base, faces weak opponents among Democrats, still hovers above 40 percent support, and confronts no single opposition figure capable of making the case against him with the urgency and potency it deserves.

If you can’t fight the facts, you’re reduced to promoting the notion that leveraging a congressionally mandated national-security pledge in order to get a foreign leader to dig up dirt on a domestic political opponent is no big whoop. That’s Tucker Carlson’s position — you can’t defend the crime, but it isn’t high enough to remove Trump from office — and it’s the smartest one. But if what Trump has clearly done isn’t a big deal, or a high crime, then you have surely nullified the impeachment clause for the indefinite future. If the clause doesn’t apply to secret quid pro quos with foreign leaders that abuse congressional funds in order to skew the course of a domestic election, what on Earth could it apply to?

If the Senate GOP lets their madman off the hook, all post-Trump presidents will be constitutionally licensed to spend or withhold Congress’ money on whatever they want, for any purpose, including conspiring with a foreign government to influence a U.S. election; and they’ll be able to do so knowing they have total impunity. Heck, if it’s only Trump who knows he can get away with this (and more) again, what sliver of hope do we have for any resistance to full-on tyranny in the executive branch in the next one or five years?

If the Senate GOP wants to exculpate Trump, and nullify any check on executive power outside of elections, they are perfectly capable of it. Mitch McConnell has no principle but short-term power. If they want permanently to alter the checks and balances against executive abuse carefully vested in the impeachment clause, they can. If they want to be a party that views perjury in a civil lawsuit as impeachable but gross, self-serving violations of the rule of law and the Constitution as not, they sure know how to do it. But will they actually go there, when it comes to the crunch? Some tiny vestige in me (and one-in-five odds in the betting markets) suspects they may feel forced to do their constitutional duty in the end.

This isn’t hard. (It’s as easy as respecting the result of a legitimate referendum, as the Remainers should do in the U.K.) It’s just that when you’ve been captured by an authoritarian cult, it seems that way.

But you can escape the cult if you want to, and cut your ties to the lawless, louche demagogue who’s gripping our liberal democracy ever more tightly by the throat. You can set yourselves (and all the rest of us) free.

9 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
cattyles

Thank you, Eat Well. This will be a good resource to link back to.

5 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
foodonastump

I’d have bolded this in Zalco’s article:

But if what Trump has clearly done isn’t a big deal, or a high crime, then you have surely nullified the impeachment clause for the indefinite future. If the clause doesn’t apply to secret quid pro quos with foreign leaders that abuse congressional funds in order to skew the course of a domestic election, what on Earth could it apply to?

11 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
dandyfopp

Lying about oral sex of course.

2 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
socks(10a)

It's like a buffet. So hard to decide what to pick.

4 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Joaniepoanie

I hope Dems throw it all in there for historical accuracy.

3 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Annie Deighnaugh

I didn't read them all...will have to later.

But I think his firing of Sally Yates and leaving Flynn in office for 18 days after he was warned multiple times that he's compromised by the russians and a national security risk impeachable.

I think his going to the postal service and trying to raise rates as a way to punish Bezos via Amazon for the negative press from the WaPo was an abuse of power.

4 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
cattyles

There have been more of those things like Annie listed that have been forgotten than there are named in that list. He has abused the power of the presidency since day 1.

5 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Iris GW

He has abused the power of the presidency since day 1.

But it's dems' fault for pointing that out!

2 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Eat Well

Impeachable Offenses

SECTION 4. The President, Vice President and all civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors.

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Iris GW

The stack is getting pretty tall.

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
jama7(6)

I wonder what prevents Dems from using all of these offenses in the impeachment process? Must be some procedural restriction.

Thanks for this list Eat Well. Saved to my files...my BURGEONING Trump file.

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
jama7(6)

I guess you can't do twofers?? Throw Pence in there? :)

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Annie Deighnaugh

I too think more should be included, but I think pelosi et al are thinking they'd be better off with just one clear-cut case of extortion than water down the case with *all* the other stuff. If they add it all to the mix, most of which the right has already discounted, it may result in discounting all charges. I'm not sure it's the right conclusion, but if it works, I'm for it. Anything to rescue the nation from being run by a criminal.

2 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Annie Deighnaugh

Re pence, perhaps the dems think pence will be easy to beat in 2020 so will let him languish as pres for the last year....

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Delilah66

Thank you, Eat Well. That is quite a compendium of offenses from an administration that isn’t yet 3 years in. You’d think he would realize it’s time to throw down the shovel.

Zalco, I agree with Sullivan all save one issue or maybe the use of “louche” was just a misspelling. None of donnie dementia’s offenses are “disreputable or sordid in a rakish or appealing way.” No. trump is “an obnoxious and contemptible person.”

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
jama7(6)

I'm worried about Vindman...he needs the SS surrounding him. How on earth does the man go back to work at the WH today?

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Annie Deighnaugh

#1 obstruction: One of the bigger deals in the mueller report of obstruction of justice was the public and private attempts to get sessions to resign as AG specifically because he recused himself from the investigation and refused to get involved in leading it. Sessions is not mentioned in the OP.

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Annie Deighnaugh

#2 emoluments: It's not just foreign emoluments but also domestic ones that trump has violated.

The President shall, at stated Times, receive for his Services, a Compensation, which shall neither be increased nor diminished during the Period for which he shall have been elected, and he shall not receive within that Period any other Emolument from the United States, or any of them.

So any time trump is making money from the federal government for, say, secret service staying in his hotels, or when he's diverting the military to stay at his Scottish place, he is receiving domestic emoluments which is against the Constitution. The *only* compensation he is to receive is his salary as set by congress.

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
vgkg Z-7 Va(Z-7)

If an Article of Schmuckery can be added to the list it would be at the top.

2 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Zalco/bring back Sophie!

Delilah, I just saw your comment. I know you are a francophile, so permit me a little linguistic wandering. I know Sullivan is British, and the British definition of louche is what you cited, but in French, the word has no charm associated with it. Any chance he is using it that way? Because truly, I cannot imagine anyone ascribing anything attractive to Trump.

At any rate I learned how the word louche is used in English, thank you. I had no idea of this different nuance.


From the Larousse:


D'une moralité douteuse : Un type louche. Mal fréquenté ou fréquenté par des personnes louches : Hôtel louche.


PS Yes, I know it's a stretch.

Save    
Browse Gardening and Landscaping Stories on Houzz See all Stories
Selling Your House Attract Home Buyers Easily With Great Photography
Show your home's best face in real estate listing photos to have potential buyers knocking down your door
Full Story
Most Popular 10 Low-Cost Tweaks to Help Your Home Sell
Put these inexpensive but invaluable fixes on your to-do list before you put your home on the market
Full Story
Decluttering Surprising Ways to Pare Down at Home
All those household items you take for granted? You might not need them after all. These lists can help you decide
Full Story
Inspiration for some backyard chats
Inspiration for a warm welcome
Inspiration for dinner time under the stars
Inspiration for a little quality time
Inspiration for making that best pizza ever
Established in 2015 and located in Northern Virginia, Above Board Construction is founded by two friends who have... Read More