NBC & Hillary Team Tried To Kill Ronan Farrow's Weinstein Story

catkinZ8a

Ronan Farrow Strikes Again: A New Book Targets NBC News and How Harvey Weinstein May Have Leveraged Matt Lauer

by Marisa Guthrie October 09, 2019, 5:00am PDT

In his first interview about the explosive 'Catch and Kill,' the journalist reveals fresh claims of secret payouts and how Lauer may have played a role in the network’s decision to kill his 2017 Harvey Weinstein exposé: "I'm very clear about the fact that Harvey was laying siege to NBC."

It was September 2017, and Harvey Weinstein was huddled at a corner table at New York's Loews Regency hotel alongside Dylan Howard, chief content officer of National Enquirer publisher American Media Inc. Weinstein had become increasingly alarmed about a story that Ronan Farrow — then a correspondent for NBC News and most famous for being the son of Mia Farrow and Woody Allen — was vigorously pursuing about the powerful producer's long-rumored sexual predations. Weinstein had worked to suppress variations of that story for decades, and he was desperate for it to stay secret. But Farrow (along with a team at The New York Times) was closing in. Weinstein wanted to bully NBC News into killing the story. He needed leverage.


Howard pulled out several thick manila envelopes and laid out their contents on the table. The men huddled for hours, strategizing quietly. Weinstein had found a pressure point: Matt Lauer.


"Weinstein made it known to the network that he was aware of Lauer's behavior and capable of revealing it," Farrow writes in his long-awaited new book, Catch and Kill: Lies, Spies and a Conspiracy to Protect Predators (Little, Brown and Company, Oct. 15). Citing anonymous sources at NBC and AMI, Farrow, 31, claims that Weinstein was using the Enquirer's accumulated dirt on the Today show star's alleged workplace misconduct to pressure NBC executives to kill Farrow's long-gestating Weinstein exposé. (Farrow also includes a denial from NBC that a specific threat was ever communicated. And in a statement to The Hollywood Reporter, the network says: "NBC News was never contacted by AMI, or made aware in any way of any threats from them, or from anyone else, for that matter. And the idea of NBC News taking a threat seriously from a tabloid company about Matt Lauer is especially preposterous, since they already covered him with great regularity.")


This tawdry alliance between AMI and Weinstein and their alleged collusion to pressure NBC is just one of the bombshell revelations dropped by New Yorker correspondent Farrow in Catch and Kill. Part memoir, part spy thriller, the book is an engrossing account of the dark arts employed by the powerful to suppress their stockpiled bad behavior as well as the cover-up culture that pervades executive suites — many of them at Farrow's former employer, NBC News.


"The [book documents] a period in which secrets at NBC were under threat of exposure," says Farrow. "And it is very clear from the conversations I document how heavily those secrets weighed on their [reporting] judgment."

It includes new details of Weinstein's personal interactions with NBC News and MSNBC chairman Andy Lack, NBC News president Noah Oppenheim and MSNBC president Phil Griffin (a frequent enough occurrence that Weinstein's assistants who were asked to place phone calls to the men dubbed them "the triumvirate"). More explosively, Farrow uncovers seven allegations of workplace se**** misconduct by Lauer that seem to contradict the network's stance that management had no knowledge of his behavior as well as seven nondisclosure agreements — many with hush-money payouts — to accusers of Lauer and others at NBC. Multiple Lauer accusers, including the woman whose complaint to NBC's human resources department resulted in Lauer's ouster, tell their stories in detail.

NBC maintains that it had no knowledge of Lauer's behavior before he was fired. A spokesperson tells THR: "Only following his termination did we reach agreements with two women who had come forward for the very first time, and those women have always been free to share their stories about Lauer with anyone they choose."


The book already has generated much pre-publication anxiety at NBCUniversal ("They're afraid of Ronan," one anchor tells THR), not to mention a series of preemptory legal attacks by those it targets. Lauer has hired attorneys at Clare Locke, which specializes in media crisis and defamation, while Howard has enlisted multiple law firms to send threatening letters to booksellers. Little, Brown has shrugged off these threats, noting that the book has been rigorously fact-checked. (A July call between NBC and fact-checker Sean Lavery, also employed at The New Yorker, stretched on for 10 hours.) In an effort to avoid any leaks, the publisher has gone to great lengths to secure the book's contents before publication. The Hollywood Reporter is one of only a handful of outlets allowed an early read, and even that had to be done in a conference room at Little, Brown's Midtown offices under the gaze of a minder. (Later, the publisher did give me a watermarked copy, which I promised not to read in public.)


On Sept. 26, Farrow joined me in the same conference room where I pored over Catch and Kill for his first interview about the book. It was unseasonably humid for September, and there was a slight gloss on his unlined face. His straw-colored hair was tucked behind his ears as if he was growing it out, or maybe he hadn't had time to get a cut. Framed portraits of Little, Brown authors Keith Richards and Donna Tartt were propped on the window ledge, eyeing us as we talked.


"The story behind the story is not about me, it's about the next reporter who comes along with a tough lead about someone who is deeply enmeshed with an executive chain of command who can hold certain revelations over them," Farrow says. "That is not a unique situation. That happens at news organizations all the time."


Catch and Kill includes some reporting previously published in The New Yorker, which ultimately ran Farrow's devastating exposé featuring eight Weinstein accusers on Oct. 10, 2017, five days after The New York Times broke the story; taken together, these pieces helped to transform the gender politics of Hollywood and, arguably, the world. But the book goes further, drawing on interviews with more than 200 sources, plus hundreds of pages of previously undisclosed contracts, emails and text messages.


A great deal of the narrative tracks how Farrow's Weinstein reporting was halted by NBC News, where he and producer Rich McHugh worked on the story for much of 2017. Farrow portrays a network slow-walking a big break as Weinstein both threatened legal action and worked to ingratiate himself with NBC executives via deals and projects. NBC maintains that Farrow did not have a single accuser on the record, but Farrow writes that NBC stymied his ability to get accusers on the record by citing a potential legal claim of "tortious interference" — which, it argued, could be triggered when one party entices another to break the kind of NDA many Weinstein accusers had signed. Farrow, a lawyer himself, argued that NBC News, in its investigative work, routinely used material from sources with nondisclosure contracts. "Obviously it becomes relevant that they were invoking that very thin logic in light of the fact that I uncovered that they had a pattern of these similar settlements," Farrow says.


Rose McGowan, who sat for an interview in February 2017, did not directly implicate Weinstein at that time because she feared the legal consequences stemming from her NDA. But by late July, Farrow writes, he had convinced her to film another interview in which she would explicitly accuse Weinstein of r***. But NBC's foot-dragging, he writes, spooked McGowan, and by Aug. 2, the network had received a cease-and-desist demand from her attorney. Farrow also obtained the audio recording from a 2015 police sting of Weinstein admitting to assaulting Italian model Ambra Gutierrez. (He reveals that it was Gutierrez who gave it to him.) Farrow says that Gutierrez was willing to go on the record, as was Emily Nestor, who worked as an assistant in The Weinstein Co.'s Los Angeles office.


The book also expands on Farrow's previous account of how, while working on the Weinstein story, his life was upended. He was on the receiving end of all manner of legal harassment, including a howler of a letter from Charles Harder, Weinstein's former attorney, that asserted Farrow's motives were related to his sister Dylan's assault allegations against their father, Woody Allen. "Mr. Farrow is entitled to his private anger," Harder wrote. He also cited Mia Farrow's brother, John Charles Villers-Farrow, who was sentenced to 10 years in prison for s******* abusing two boys. "We have yet to find any evidence that Ronan Farrow has publicly denounced his uncle, and he might have publicly supported him," the letter stated. Ronan says he's never met his uncle.


Farrow's phone was tracked and his Instagram account hacked. And as he detailed in The New Yorker, private espionage agents using false identities attempted to obtain information about his reporting. "I had to literally go on the run from people hired to stake me out," he says. He moved out of his Columbus Circle apartment and into a building in Chelsea, where a wealthy friend's father (he won't say who) had several empty floors. "Obviously getting chased around by hired spies is not a normal experience," he says. "It's surreal. It's stressful."


As the work consumed him, he says he neglected his relationship with partner Jon Lovett, the former Obama speechwriter and Pod Save America podcast co-host (to whom the book is dedicated). "He didn't break up with me when I was an insane ball of stress and everything in my life was falling apart and I was needy and demanding all the time," says Farrow. In the book, Lovett offers running commentary that veers from comic relief to outraged bystander. When NBC News informed Farrow, to his shock, that he was "terminated," Lovett quipped, "I'll take care of you, baby. I'll keep you in finery and smoothies." Meanwhile, Farrow was doing his best to shield his mother from the extent of the threats. "She was very scared for me as I was on the run from these spies, and I was trying to tell her as little as possible because none of us wants our mom freaking out," he explains.


In pursuit of the story, he says, "I lost my job and the future I thought I was going to have," recalling how his MSNBC show had just been canceled after a single little-watched season. He did not yet have the Pulitzer he would share with Times reporters Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey. They had not yet helped launch the #MeToo movement.


"I exposed a lot of misconduct that burned bridges, and that's fine, I can take it," he says. "Thankfully, because of the way the story went, I feel like I still have momentum where I can keep breaking stories."



Full:

https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/features/ronan-farrow-book-how-harvey-weinstein-may-have-leveraged-matt-lauer-1246149



How Harvey Weinstein tried to kill Ronan Farrow story using intel on Matt Lauer from National Enquirer, roping in Hillary Clinton and even his estranged father Woody Allen

  • Harvey Weinstein leaned on a number of his high-powered friends to try and kill Ronan Farrow's expose with varying degrees of success
  • A publicist for Hillary Clinton told Farrow that his 'big story' was a 'concern for us' when the journalist sought access to the presidential hopeful
  • That publicist, Nick Merrill, and Clinton would claim to have no knowledge of Weinstein's s***** misconduct when the expose ran just a few months later
  • Farrow claims that NBC killed his story at the network after Weinstein and AMI went after Matt Lauer, using intel compiled by the media company
  • 'The idea of NBC News taking a threat seriously from a tabloid company about Matt Lauer is especially preposterous,' said NBC
  • Days before the expose dropped, Weinstein even called Farrow's estranged father Woody Allen, who said: 'Jeez, I'm so sorry. Good luck'

By CHRIS SPARGO FOR DAILYMAIL.COM

PUBLISHED: 14:39 EDT, 9 October 2019 | UPDATED: 19:14 EDT, 9 October 2019


Harvey Weinstein turned to his vast Rolodex of high-powered friends to try and kill Ronan Farrow's expose detailing his decades of s***** misconduct.


In an interview with The Hollywood Reporter, Farrow said that among those Weinstein turned to were Hillary Clinton, the editors of American Media and even his estranged father Woody Allen.

The first two went to considerable lengths to try and quash Farrow's reporting, and dossiers detailing allegations of Matt Lauer's s***** misconduct during his time on Today did play a role in NBC killing the story while he was at the network, claims Farrow.


Clinton did her best too says Farrow, who recounts being told his 'big story' was a 'concern for us' by the then-presidential hopeful's publicist Nick Merrill.


He also claims that the campaign withheld access to Clinton at a time when Farrow was trying to interview her for the foreign policy book he was working on at the time.


Attempts to rope in Farrow's family were much less successful, including a call to Farrow's estranged father Woody Allen.


'Jeez, I'm so sorry. Good luck,' Allen told Weinstein, explaining that there was nothing he could do to stop the story.


Farrow published his expose on Weinstein five days after The New York Times.


His reporting was aided at the time by work previously done for the New Yorker by Ken Auletta, who had learned of a number of incidents involving the mogul in the early aughts.

Farrow would go on to win the Pulitzer Prize for his work.


HILLARY CLINTON AND STAFF

Farrow's claims about Clinton and AMI were first reported by The New York Times in a story that cited separate specific incidents.

In that story, from December 2017, Merrill was asked bout Weinstein's behavior, and said: 'We were shocked when we learned what he’d done. It’s despicable behavior, and the women that have come forward have shown enormous courage.'


Mamma Mia: Farrow's sister and uncle were named in a letter from Weinstein's lawyer


That would have been months after he referenced Farrow's 'big story.'


The Times reported that Lena Dunham told multiple members of Clinton's staff about Weinstein's behavior well before the publication of both exposes.


'I just want you to let you know that Harvey’s a ****** and this is going to come out at some point,' said Dunham.


'I think it’s a really bad idea for him to host fund-raisers and be involved because it’s an open secret in Hollywood that he has a problem with s***** assault.'


Dunham was assured her concerns would be relayed to campaign manager Robby Mook, but later shared her story again with a spokesperson when the campaign continued to have Weinstein spearhead events and fundraisers for Clinton.


Merrill, when confronted with Dunham's recollections, said: 'As to claims about a warning, that’s something staff wouldn’t forget.'


AMERICAN MEDIA AND DYLAN HOWARD

The Times report also noted how AMI utilized the practice of 'catch and kill' to make sure that Weinstein accuser Ambra Battilana Gutierrez could not share her allegations of ****** misconduct.

Farrow claims that NBC killed his story after an hours-long strategy session between AMI's chief content officer Dylan Howard and Weinstein.


Howard came to that meeting with a trove of information about NBC in dossiers, and in the end Weinstein chose to use Lauer to kill the story according to Farrow.


'Weinstein made it known to the network that he was aware of Lauer's behavior and capable of revealing it,' writes Farrow in his book.


AMI does not deny this relationship with Weinstein, and has stated previously that any work done of his behalf took place before any allegations of ****** misconduct became public.


'NBC News was never contacted by AMI, or made aware in any way of any threats from them, or from anyone else, for that matter,' said a spokesperson for the network.

'And the idea of NBC News taking a threat seriously from a tabloid company about Matt Lauer is especially preposterous, since they already covered him with great regularity. NBC meanwhile scoffed at Farrow's claim that a tabloid's threat would be powerful enough to shut down a project at the network.'


FAMILY HISTORY

Weinstein's lawyer tried to get Farrow to kill his own story with a letter referencing various members of his family, recalls the journalist.


In that letter, Charles Harder 'asserted Farrow's motives were related to his sister Dylan's assault allegations against their father, Woody Allen.


Harder wrote: 'Mr. Farrow is entitled to his private anger.'


ANDY LACK MEMO TO STAFF ON RONAN FARROW


Farrow's book makes new allegations about how NBC Chairman Andrew Lack handled the Weinstein scandal and his attempts to report on it

Dear Colleagues,

This morning, reporting around Ronan Farrow’s new book revealed deeply disturbing details related to the incident that led to Matt Lauer’s termination from NBC. I want to take a moment to communicate with you about this.

First, and most importantly, in reading today’s news our hearts go out to our former colleague.

Matt Lauer’s conduct in 2014 was appalling and reprehensible – and of course we said so at the time. The first moment we learned of it was the night of November 27, 2017, and he was fired in 24 hours. Any suggestion that we knew prior to that evening or tried to cover up any aspect of Lauer's conduct is absolutely false and offensive.

Following Lauer’s firing, NBCU's legal team did an exhaustive investigation of available records and conducted dozens of interviews of past and present staff. They uncovered no claims or settlements associated with allegations of inappropriate conduct by Lauer before he was fired. Only following his termination did NBCU reach agreements with two women who had come forward for the very first time, and those women have always been free to share their stories about Lauer with anyone they choose.

Today, some have questioned why we used the term “****** misconduct” to describe the reason for Lauer’s firing in the days following. We chose those words carefully to precisely mirror the public words at that time of the attorney representing our former NBC colleague.

In the past two years we have taken significant steps to improve our culture and ensure we have a workplace where everyone feels safe and respected, as well as protected in raising claims. Since then, we've required all NBC News employees to complete in-person workplace behavior trainings and we’ve significantly increased awareness of the ways employees can report concerns – anonymously or otherwise.

In addition to his reporting on Lauer, Farrow’s new book also includes his telling of the NBC News investigation of Harvey Weinstein.

As you know, our news organization is filled with dedicated, professional journalists, including some of the best and most experienced investigative reporters, as well as others who support our reporting with exceptional talent, integrity and decency. It disappoints me to say that even with passage of time, Farrow’s account has become neither more accurate, nor more respectful of the dedicated colleagues he worked with here at NBC News. He uses a variety of tactics to paint a fundamentally untrue picture.

Here are the essential and indisputable facts: NBC News assigned the Harvey Weinstein story to Ronan, we completely supported it over many months with resources – both financial and editorial. After seven months, without one victim or witness on the record, he simply didn’t have a story that met our standard for broadcast nor that of any major news organization. Not willing to accept that standard and not wanting to get beaten by the New York Times, he asked to take his story to an outlet he claimed was ready to publish right away. Reluctantly, we allowed him to go ahead. Fifty-three days later, and five days after the New York Times did indeed break the story, he published an article at the New Yorker that bore little resemblance to the re

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catkinZ8a

Believe all women--unless it'd hurt your presidential campaign!

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Eat Well

Reading comprehension is your friend. There is NOTHING in your post that states that Hillary's team tried to "kill" Farrow's story.

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catkinZ8a

Ronan Farrow must be a liar, then.


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margaux

catkinZ8a

Believe all women--unless it'd hurt your presidential campaign!

So you do believe Trump's accusers?

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Eat Well

catkinZ8a

Ronan Farrow must be a liar, then.

---------

Logical fallacy. Please show me the quote in your post from Ronan Farrow that says, "Hillary's team TRIED TO KILL the Weinstein story".

3,2,1 meme

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Carro

How long did it take Hillary to release a response to Weinstein's scandal?

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catkinZ8a

Days and days.

He paid her off.






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Ziemia(6a)

Impossible to follow the argument as launched by the thread title and comments.

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Ziemia(6a)

How come all this text is BOLD here?


Trying to paint Lena Dunham as a hero?

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catkinZ8a

Russia! Russia! Russia!

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catkinZ8a



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catkinZ8a

Lena Dunham, Tina Brown Reportedly Warned Clinton Campaign About Weinstein

The women said they’d cautioned her aides in 2008 and 2016.

By Dominique Mosbergen


Two influential women in media said they warned Hillary Clinton’s aides about Harvey Weinstein — but their words of caution appeared to go unheeded.


Actress and director Lena Dunham told The New York Times that she reached out to two members of Clinton’s presidential campaign team last year to alert them to troubling rumors she’d heard about the Hollywood mogul. She recalled telling Kristina Schake, the campaign’s deputy communications director, last March that “Harvey’s a ****** and this is going to come out at some point.”


“I think it’s a really bad idea for him to host fundraisers and be involved because it’s an open secret in Hollywood that he has a problem with ****** assault,” Dunham remembered adding, referencing Weinstein’s support for Clinton’s campaign. Weinstein was a major Democratic Party donor. He donated in the range of $100,001 to $250,000 to the Clinton Foundation through June 2017, according to the nonprofit’s website.


Dunham, a vocal Clinton supporter, said Schake promised to relay her message about Weinstein to campaign manager Robby Mook. Dunham said she later also reached out to Adrienne Elrod, a Clinton spokeswoman, after her initial warnings had no apparent effect.

The “Girls” creator has since been outspoken in her support of Weinstein’s accusers.
The woman who chose to speak about their experience of harassment by Harvey Weinstein deserve our awe. It’s not fun or easy. It’s brave.
— Lena Dunham (@lenadunham) October 5, 2017

Magazine editor and author Tina Brown told the Times that she’d also warned Clinton’s aides years before about Weinstein.


During the 2008 presidential race, Brown said she told “a member of Clinton’s inner circle” in an email that the former first lady was “unwise to be so closely associated with him.”


It remains unclear whether these warnings ever reached Clinton’s ears. Elrod and Schake did not deny that Dunham had reached out to them, however, telling the Times only that the term “rape” was never mentioned.


Clinton, who was criticized for initially remaining silent about the Weinstein accusations, has suggested she knew nothing of the producer’s predatory behavior prior to the first bombshell article in the Times describing the ****** harassment allegations against him.

“I was appalled. It was something that was just intolerable in every way,” she told CNN’s Fareed Zakaria in October. “And, you know, like so many people who’ve come forward and spoken out, this was a different side of a person who I and many others had known in the past.”

Clinton added at the time that she intended to donate the funds that Weinstein had given to her campaign to charity.

“What other people are saying, what my former colleagues are saying, is they’re going to donate it to charity, and of course I will do that,” she told Zakaria. “I give 10 percent of my income to charity every year, this will be part of that. There’s no ― there’s no doubt about it.”


https://www.huffpost.com/entry/lena-dunham-tina-brown-clinton-weinstein_n_5a275dc6e4b0c2117626ae87

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catkinZ8a

Harvey Weinstein was discussing a new documentary TV show with Hillary Clinton’s team the month before he was exposed as an alleged serial sexual predator—and despite her team having been warned about him—according to a new report.

The New York Times published a detailed account on Tuesday, based on nearly 200 interviews, that describes the network of complicity surrounding the disgraced movie mogul. It largely covers how assistants, journalists, and agents helped Weinstein target young actresses and cover up his alleged misconduct.

But the article also details Weinstein’s long-running association with Bill and Hillary Clinton, for whom he raised funds and donated cash. It’s not clear whether allegations of his sexual activities reached the Clintons themselves, but the actress and writer Lena Dunham said she warned Hillary Clinton’s deputy communications director, Kristina Schake, in 2016 that Weinstein was a rapist and that this would come out at some point.

Tina Brown, the veteran journalist and publisher, also said she warned Clinton’s team during the 2008 presidential race, saying it was unwise for the candidate to associate with Weinstein.

“We were shocked when we learned what he’d done,” Clinton communications director Nick Merrill told the Times “It’s despicable behavior, and the women that have come forward have shown enormous courage. As to claims about a warning, that’s something staff wouldn’t forget… Only [Dunham] can answer why she would tell them instead of those who could stop him.”

According to the Times, Weinstein was emailing with Clinton lawyer Robert Barnett in September this year, discussing distribution rights for “a documentary television show he was working on with Hillary Clinton.”

Other fresh details include Gwyneth Paltrow’s allegation that Weinstein falsely told people she had slept with him, suggesting that for other actresses who followed suit, it would be “the best thing you can do for your career now.”

Apart from that, the article largely expands on what has emerged over the past few months: that Weinstein got people to dig up dirt on women who might report his misconduct, and that his business associates regularly suppressed information on his behalf and tolerated his behavior.

It also shows Weinstein called in favors among friends in the tabloid press, such as The National Enquirer, to run hit pieces on his potential accusers.

https://fortune.com/2017/12/06/harvey-weinstein-hillary-clinton-lena-dunham-tina-brown-warn/

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Kitchenwitch111

OMG Hillary Hillary Hillary! The RW is obsessssssed with her!

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elvis

Living in the glass house, Lauer really shouldn't have been throwing stones.

(This thread is stuck in bold mode)

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catkinZ8a

Fixed.

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cattyles

Why are you so obsessed with Hillary Clinton?

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foodonastump

Impeach the SOB.

(Miss you Heri!)

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cattyles

Me too.

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catkinZ8a

Slimeball Andy Lack's on the hot seat, too.

Why does NBC still employ him?


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chijim

Old news...

It came out at the time NBC sat on the story, either for fear of reprisals or they couldn't prove the allegations to their satisfaction

Curious, with all the allegations against Trump....why are you sticking by him?


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catkinZ8a

LOL!

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catkinZ8a

Not old news--Farrow's book just came out!

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chijim


catkinZ8a

Not old news--Farrow's book just came out!


^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

It's old news about NBC sitting on the story about Weinstein. The allegation/accusation came out when the orig story broke.

The Matt Lauer rape allegation is new.

Not a shining moment for NBC

From Oct 2017


RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We're learning more about how the Harvey Weinstein scandal came
to light, or, more precisely, how it did not. The New York Times broke
the story about the Hollywood producer who's settled numerous claims of
sexual harassment. Then the journalist Ronan Farrow published a version
of the story which he said he'd been reporting for a long time.
Originally, Farrow took the story to NBC News, his employer at the time,
which did not run it. So he went elsewhere. Here's Farrow talking on
MSNBC.


(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "THE RACHEL MADDOW SHOW")

https://www.npr.org/2017/10/12/557355945/decision-not-to-publish-weinstein-story-roils-nbc

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Delilah66

Why post this trash? SOB

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catkinZ8a

Ronan Farrow's on The View tomorrow.


The View

Author Ronan Farrow; lifestyle expert Gretta Monahan.

60:00 | TV-14

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catkinZ8a

We are just starting to learn what’s in my former colleague Ronan Farrow’s forthcoming book, “Catch and Kill,” but what we’ve learned thus far is astonishing. He paints a sinister portrait of NBC News where, according to Farrow, a culture of harassment, self-interest and elite-coddling ultimately led the organization to spike the groundbreaking story of sexual abuse allegations against entertainment mogul Harvey Weinstein.


But if what Farrow claims is true, just think about the implications of that reported statement. Weinstein was rich and powerful, with a lot of friends and money for good lawyers, not to mention private investigators. It might be uncomfortable at parties. Other people in “the club” might be mad. The cost-benefit model of news analysis has favored taking down the powerless who can’t fight back over the powerful who have the money and the connections to put up a fight.


Farrow also has implicated the Clintons. At the time he was reporting the allegations against Weinstein, Farrow was trying to secure an interview with Hillary Clinton on foreign policy. He claims then-Secretary of State Clinton’s publicist Nick Merrill sent him a gem of an email explaining that the “big story” Farrow was working on was “a concern for us.” In other words, drop the story on Weinstein or no interview. Weinstein had been a big donor to Clinton’s campaign. It ultimately took her an eyebrow-raising five days to issue any sort of statement following the initial New York Times reporting on allegations of Weinstein’s sexual misconduct.


The whole thing is a sordid stew of elite-coddling and cowardice. It’s also an extreme parable of how the news process too often works. News isn’t judged just on its newsworthiness. It’s filtered through a prism of class solidarity and institutional self-preservation. Matt Taibbi, in his book “Hate Inc.,”writes about the proliferation of news stories that punch down the local restaurant or marginalized citizens — they’re just so much easier to take on. It’s much more difficult, costly and uncomfortable to challenge those with power — the banks or the big corporations or the Harvey Weinsteins of the world.


Full:

https://thehill.com/opinion/technology/465466-ronan-farrow-exposes-how-the-media-protect-the-powerful

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Ziemia(6a)

Oh, goody, it's that time of day again.

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Ziemia(6a)

Ronan Farrow does good work showing the validity of the MeToo movement.

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